Reginald

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Posts posted by Reginald


  1. I love my UPT (formerly RWS) "Tru-Lok" and I hate the VooDoo toggle set up. I have 1,500 plus jumps on tru-lok's and have never had a toggle fire or any other sort of problem. When the brake lines are stowed per the instructions I don't even know how it would be possible. Plus the stowage of the excess line is superb. Nothing is in the way to accidentally get snagged, etc. Just my opinion but I LOVE the Tru-Lok's. :)
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  2. Good job of living. But I’ve got to say that it’s a situation you likely shouldn’t have been in. PC out at 2,500? That meets the minimum per the BSR’s but it’s awful low for someone with 150 jumps. I don’t like pulling below 3,000 unless I have a compelling reason (Big way requirement, etc.). Part of the problem it creates is that per BSR’s your decision altitude should be no lower than 1,800 (and higher is okay). My Sabre2 pretty routinely takes about 800 feet to open. So deploying at 2,500 puts you at about 1,700 feet. That is a NEGITIVE safety margin of 100 feet. Add in a couple of seconds to recognize an issue and react and you are likely down to the 1,500 you acted at. What you are describing may have been correctable by releasing your toggles. This would have been an option open to you if you pulled at 3,000 and had a little extra time. But you were LOW and didn’t have many options.

    Math for my personal minimum pull altitude:
    3,000 PC out (for anything other than an extraordinary jump which is a different conversation)
    800 Feet for my canopy to open
    2,200 Expected canopy open altitude
    1,800 Decision altitude
    Equals 400 feet of safety margin for dealing with a problem such as line twists, etc. That’s not a lot but at least it’s something. Pulling any lower means there is little to no time to deal with ANY problem even a minor one thus increasing the chances of an unnecessary cutaway.

    I educate all my students on the above math. Build a pull altitude from the BOTTOM up. Start with decision altitude, add desired safety margin, add canopy deployment time and then calculate a minimum pull altitude. It’s usually a lot higher than the MINIMUM the BSR’s give for a given license.
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  3. Um, lot's of people here have fusions on their necks. Mine is on the C6/C7. It's kind of a club we have going on in the sport. I didn't jump for 6 months after mine second one (long story).

    She's right that the discs above and below will take more stress and likely wear out sooner than they might otherwise. So the point is to avoid doing anything that will cause extra stress. Have a soft opening canopy, don't wear a camera on your head, etc.

    If what you had was a normal fusion talk to her about it and get a better explanation of why she doesn't want you to jump. She may have a good medical reason or she just may think you don’t need to jump anyway – does not understand the sport. There are plenty of sports medicine Dr.'s that put people back on professional football teams after fusions. A little skydiving can’t to any worse. As my Dr. told me, “You may break your neck skydiving but not where I fused it!”
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  4. Quote

    Ronald:
    -I never even posted a link, what are you smoking?
    - I don't think the rules state which language you have to use
    - That's NOT Italian but Spanish......



    LOL. :)
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  5. Quote

    Pues que pasa Lucia? Pablo no tiene suficeinte dinero para hacer una llamdita. Se lo puedo prestar yo.....



    Okay “little kitten” this isn’t the Italian forum, speak “American.” ;) And you put up the wrong link. Try this one:

    http://results.worldgames2009.tw/en/Comp.mvc/Info/AI/ResultList/AIX401102
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  6. I log my jumps although it’s usually at the end of every weekend - not a lot more detail that I get off my pro track and which students I jumped with etc. If I go to a big way I put a little more. I put all my jumps from a day on a single page. It’s minimalistic but legal.

    I just believe that having an up to date log book, USPA card, and in date reserve data card as my bona fides when I show up to a DZ (and I travel around a lot) is the minimum I can do to show my credentials. I can honestly say that I can show up anywhere any time show my credential and wiz through wavering, etc. at any DZ anytime.

    Frankly, it annoys the hell out of my when someone shows up at my DZ and I’m called back to talk to them and they have a rig but no “credentials” and then expect to hop on a plane. We are actually a by the book kind of DZ. Then they want ME to call around and get people at their old DZ to vouch for their jump numbers and currency. It’s honestly rude. Why are they putting their problem off on me to solve for them? And it’s great when their DZ is closed for the day or no one answers…

    Loging suck, it’s the no fun part of jumping. But some minimal effort goes a long way in the long run.
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  7. Quote

    i just completed my sixth jump in the SL course and the owner of the drop zone said he would sign me clear of the radio in my log book. i looked on my A license progression card and couldn't find anything relating to that phrase. Does it have any meaning beyond me not needing a radio anymore?

    Thanks
    K



    No.
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  8. Quote

    Yeah ok I learned about how reducing arch will increase my lift in the WT. But is it really that much?
    Can I at 180lbs fall as slow as a guy @130lbs?



    These are some of the things you should be learning in a good coaching program as you progress to your license. The approperiate jumpsuites, etc. should be provided to you by the dropzone you are learning at for now.
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  9. First of all use all three alarms. You are not planning on using the most important one! The last alarm for your decision altitude is the most important. When you hear the flat line you better be damn sure you're pulling your last handles. Do not set it below your decision altitude, as it’s of less value to know your screwed at 500 feet below when you are supposed to be doing something as important as your EP’s. Also, do not set it higher as you don't want to become desensitized to it going off with a partially inflated canopy. Set it AT your decision altitude and recognize that when it goes off it is time so do something right then and there if you aren’t already. Malfunctions can suck people attention away from their visual altimeter unlike ordinary freefall.

    As for the other altitudes feel free to set them where you like, but honestly most people end up setting them at their break off and pull altitudes. Some people will tell you that this is bad as one may become dependent on it. Well don’t. Use your visual, your eyes and your audible - three are better than two. I’ve personally, never understood the value of a late alarm. However, if you’re a newbie (can’t tell as you don’t have your profile filled out) and still working on building altitude awareness than maybe setting it lower for a couple of hundred jumps isn’t such a bad idea.
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP

  10. Quote

    Quote

    Quote

    We are a 4-way team (plus one camera flyer).



    I don't know. I never saw more than 3 of you in frame at any one time! ;)



    :D:D:D Thats some funny shit there!



    Hey I've got video of one of my early 4 way teams and there is rarely more than 2 of us in frame for the first half of the season!
    "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." CP