murphyka

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Posts posted by murphyka


  1. From first hand experience, you will have a rough time getting the number of jumps in that you want. I have a 10 month old which comes to the DZ with me. There is usually someone that is gracious enough to watch her while I catch a quick load or I set up someone to watch her during the day if I am training with a team. I love bringing her to the DZ because she gets to interact with so many people.

    If you bring your child to the DZ and expect to jump, make sure that there are responsible people there that you can trust completely!
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

  2. I always enjoyed Scott's presence at the DZ. He was the hardest worker out there. He worked straight from sun up to sun down with a smile on his face and never complained. I admired him for that.

    Scott, it will be very hard to get on the plane without you being there to high five and wish me a good jump. Your face will be missed.

    Kimmy

  3. Keep your eyes on SPX8 in the intermediate division. These guys have worked really hard this season and are doing well. They are especially doing well after losing a team member due to a non-skydiving related injury and having to replace him at the last training.

    I filled in for a weekend of training with these guys and it was so much fun jumping with them. (I think all they needed was a little estrogen on their team to make them perform at their peak!!;))

    Good Luck Guys (and Angela)! We'll see you back at Spaceland.

    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

  4. Since you don't jump at this dropzone in particular, you have no clue what you are talking about.

    First and foremost, it is not the instructors' primary job to make sure that students have fun on their skydive. Their job is to ensure that the student gets the education that they need so that they can enjoy ALL of their jumps in a safe manner.

    I can't think of one instructor at the DZ who does not want their student to enjoy freefall. I am sorry if you have had an experience elsewhere that you think that is the norm. You are sadly mistaken in this case!
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

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    I wonder if your instructors are in fact the problem. Perhaps they are making you more nervous than you need to be. An instructor must have a trust with his students in order to build confidence in them.



    You don't have any clue what you're talking about and you don't know Scott at all. As a matter of fact why don't you ask Scott if this is the case. I already know what the answer is.[:/]


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    I agree. I have seen the instructors talking to Scott and are in no way saying things that would make him more nervous. Besides, if an instructor does have a trust with his/her students, then they should not be taking them on a jump.

    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

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    In my (experienced) opinion, I do not believe Scott needs more tunnel time nor needs to take time off (in fact, taking time off may be counterproductive in his case); it is just a matter of sticking with it. I can give this assessment about Scott because I have worked with him in person, he has got it going on, but he just has not realized that yet...


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    I agree with Mykel in this case. Don't get me wrong, I love the tunnel and think that it is an excellent training tool, BUT I have seen many experienced skydivers get in the tunnel and not be able fly as well as they do normally in freefall. Scott has already admitted that financially, the sport is digging deep into his pockets and we all know that tunnel time is not cheap. This is especially the case since there is the cost of travel to get to the tunnel. IMHO, the money he would spend at this point to get the tunnel time would be better spent on the jumps to try to pass. This is just my opinion after talking to him on occasion.

    Scott, A little bit of confidence can go a long way. Get rid of the doubts in your abilities and convince yourself that you can do it. Sometimes it is mind over matter.

    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

  7. Congratulations Scott! I was talking with your instructor and he had mentioned that you were going to try to make some jumps on Monday. Looks like that time that you spent at the DZ talking to others has paid off! Welcome back to the air! It's such a refreshing place to be after a long layoff.

    By the way...thanks for babysitting on Saturday...I was really needing to get back in the air!
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

  8. Good Luck to all of the TSR participants! I wish I could be there with you guys but looks like our little one has decided to hold out for Tuesday when the event gets started.

    It would be a great birthday present for the TSR and her birth to be on the same day!
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

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    The D (Master) should require more in depth knowledge and allow more responsibilty.

    In fact, I'd like to see additional reqs on the D license - including some proficiency in freeflying, CrW, higher performance canopy flight in addition to accuracy, more advanced RW skills (mantis-based flying), gear knowledge, more in depth safety and FAR review, freefall drift and spotting knowledge in more depth.

    Today, the D license is pretty well about jump numbers and a skill level that is next to nothing with the knowledge today. The intent was (should be) at least three fold:

    skill - basic skills in freeflying and advanced belly, CrW and swooping basics, etc

    safety - exit order (and why), basic gear knowledge for checks, traffic issues, etc

    knowledge - FARs, teaching, BSRs, coaching, etc



    I agree totally that one should have knowledge of all these things, BUT most of what you have listed should be demonstrated WELL before someone is applying for a D license.

    The extraneous things such as swooping knowledge and CRW skills should not be put off until a D license either. What is it that is keeping a B license holder from trying their hand at swooping? Nothing! Are you saying that in this case a person would have to wait until they have the required 500 jumps to be able to swoop. Therein lies a problem. How would you test them to see if they have the ability to swoop if they are not permitted to swoop unless they have the appropriate license.

    This is just an isolated example where I am trying to make a point that there are far too many skill sets in this sport that some would say need to be regulated in the sport by a license, but it is almost impossible to do. Some of these skills are by far the most dangerous and you don't need any type of license to attempt.
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

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    Should I have to perform an intentional cutaway to show that I can handle that risk? Again, this and other examples of much riskier feats make that argument a moot point.





    To get a Tandem rating you have to either have performed an emergency cut away, or an intentional one...Yes, to SHOW you can handle the 'risk'.



    My understanding is that is not completely true for all Tandem manufactures ratings. A Vector rating does not require that. BUT I do see your point.

    A D license a precursor to getting a tandem rating. It is NOT a requirement to have a performed an emergency cutaway to get a D. Are you suggesting that it be added as a requirement for a D license. There are plenty of D license holders out there who have thousands of jumps and not a single cutaway.

    AND Not everyone out there trying to get a D License is going to go for a tandem rating.
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

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    ...Blah blah blah...

    Because most skydivers will, at some point in their skydiving career, push sunset until they are landing in very dim (even dark) conditions. I know, "just say no" and all that. But history has shown that people DON'T "just say no" all the time. And having the experience to deal with landing under those conditions when a skydiver inevitably encounters them can save lives.



    You would have a point IF, and ONLY IF, a "D" were a condition of being allowed on a sunset load. It isn't, and your reason is silly.



    I completely agree. I have been on many "just after sunset loads" as he is talking about. I didn't need a D License to get on that load nor did anyone question my abilities to execute my skydive safely.

    If you want to make it an argument that this is why we should have to do night jumps to get a D License, then shouldn't those jumps count toward the requirement of night jumps. If not, then your argument just lost it's validity.

    Others have talked about the fact that doing the night jump shows that you are able to face the risk of potentially jumping at night. If that is your argument, then why isn't there a requirement for other risks. I am much more at risk to have a cutaway (on EVERY JUMP) than to be faced with night jump conditions (of which I have control over when I get on the plane or not). Should I have to perform an intentional cutaway to show that I can handle that risk? Again, this and other examples of much riskier feats make that argument a moot point.
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

  12. Two years ago we made our own creepers for our 8-way team. The cost was about $85 per creeper but we also were fortunate to get some of the supplies for much cheaper than normal. I think it would have been a wash otherwise.
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

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    >How a about a "restricted" D-license? I could meet all the other
    >requirements for a D and laugh my ass off at the "no night jump"
    >restriction on it.

    An excellent solution - provided you also have the willingness to scratch off loads that are at risk of busting the sunset time.



    Which is what most of us who don't have the desire to do a night jump have the tendency to do anyway.

    Plus, there is a difference between doing a jump just after sunset where there is still ambient light and doing a jump under the conditions of organized night jumps.

    I am all for a "restricted D license" if that would solve the issue.
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

  14. I totally agree. What in the hell does doing a night jump actually prove?

    I have all the requirements to get my D license and have chosen not to just because I have no desire to do a night jump. People have said, "What if you are on a plane and it is dark and you need to get out?"
    My reply, "Well then I will get out!" Most likely if there is an emergency in an airplane at night (which I would have to willingly be on a jump plane at night in the first place) the conditions are probably not going to be as tailored for a night jump as they are when they are organized. There won't be lights in the landing area and people are not going to be decked out with the usual chem lights and strobes and there may not be a perfect full moon and clear sky. It will be a true emergency and I would have to deal with it in the current not so perfect conditions.

    At least most of the requirements for any ratings that I actually want to obtain only require a C License now. For now, I am happy with that and will not be bending over backwards to get my D.
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

  15. Skydive Spaceland will be holding the 4th Annual 4-way Scrambles Event on Saturday, February 24th. It's that time again for experienced jumpers to refresh their RW skills and offer their expertise to those jumpers who are just starting out. Teams will be formed to ensure that the experience levels are as even as possible.

    This event is open to jumpers of all levels. We especially encourage new jumpers and freeflyers to participate.

    On Sunday, we will be holding a 4-way Speed Star Competition. This event is also open to jumpers of all disciplines. Start forming your teams now.

    If you have questions or need more information, please contact me at [email protected]
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy

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    It's not really unbelievable at all. Deer do that all the time in reaction to the sound of the bowstring. At longer ranges it's relatively easy for them to "string jump" and dodge an arrow. It happens all the time.



    I did not know that (I do not hunt). You have to admit that to the average Joe (like me) that would have to look pretty impresive.

    Richards



    Yes, it does look rather impressive. It's particularly cool in slow motion.
    Blue Skies!!!
    Kimmy