skylord

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    Elsinore
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  1. skylord

    Otter AFF exit

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vy7caLCWiT4 There you go! Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  2. skylord

    Shindig

    This was a wonderful service, and for those in attendance, the story about the sheriff's academy instructor getting all wound up by the "shrimp" that wouldn't polish his boots was the best I've ever heard. Shindig was already a retired and decorated Marine, HALO instructor, former DI, and a whole slew of other accomplishments, when he reported to the Sheriff's academy. "The Dude", as the much younger academy instructor called him, would not polish his boots. The Sheriff's Academy instructor let this get under his skin. It bothered him to the point that several weeks later, he could not sleep, so he got up, turned on the Discovery Channel, and saw a special on HALO: Freefall Warriors. We skydivers were already in stiches, we knew what was coming. This instructor said, "And suddenly, on TV, was that dude." Can you imagine that? A student who so gets to you that you cannot sleep, you turn on escape TV, and there he is. The Dude. A marvelous, wonderful, and heartbreaking ceremony. I watched from the ground the ash dive, and fly by. One of the most poignant tributes I've ever seen. I cried. I watched his kids play, and I cried some more. I watched my mentor in the sport hug and kiss the widow in front of me, and break down. Then I stepped up to pay my respects, and Gage, the older son and de facto man of the house at seven, took my offered handshake and turned it into a skydiving handshake. I cried. I told everyone around me that was the way I want to be remembered. A wonderful job by the Elsinore family, and I am left otherwise speechless.........my two cents. Bob Marks Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  3. skylord

    Shindig

    Shark and the rest of my Elsinore DZ family, I am so sorry to hear of this news. While I didn't know him well, he was always accessible and had answers for me as I went through my perpetual re currency training. All thoughts and prayers to you all, his family, and Shindig...... Bob Marks Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  4. It was filmed at the old Quartz Hill airport near Palmdale/Lancaster. I know because over 30 years later I lived there only about 500 ft from the location. I recognized the street I used to walk my daughter to school on. Yep, good ol' Quartz Hill. They built over the airport in the very late 80's or early 90's. Oh, I'm talking about the MST3K Skydivers movie.... Bob Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  5. skylord

    I Passed Level 1 AFF!!!!

    Congratulations! Great job. On my practice pulls (we got to altitude) I kept grabbing my main side instructor's altimeter. At pull time on the video I reached back, grabbed his altimeter again, and he pulled for me. On level 1 you can still pass, and I did. On the ground I was asked what I learned. I told them I should not pull on the instructor's altimeter. It does not deploy the parachute and annoys the instructor. Congratulations again, it is so worth it!! Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  6. skylord

    It's the little things that add up

    This is a great statement. I learned much from it. I think this is a valuable point of view. Bob Marks Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  7. This is an addictive sport, trust me, I know! I have three children, 23, 21, and 17. I'm not a "mum", but as dz.com's most eligible bachelor with children, I can make a few comments. Who is "making" you feel guilty and "irresponsible"? No one can do that. But you do have an obligation to yourself and your children. Are you health and life insured for skydiving? If you are injured, will your income continue? Will your health expenses be covered? Simply jumping is not a reason for people to try and put the guilt trip on you, but if you have children in my opinion it is imperative to make sure they are taken care of in the event something unforeseen happens. In advance. Making you feel guilty about putting your life at risk is misplaced. Asking about how your children would be taken care of in the event something happens is not. Keep living, but be responsible to those that count on you. Bob Marks Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  8. Just clarifying...this rule is just for the boogie, right? I'm going there after the boogie and wanted to do some high openings at sunset and geek the desert, if possible. Correct, and they still do some high altitude hop 'n pops right around sunset, to, if I recall. Bob Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  9. I went last year with just over 100 jumps and felt very comfortable. You get a good safety briefing/orientation on the DZ, the rules, and the patterns as well as the outs. Had a blast, and never felt over my head, or I shouldn't be there or anything like that. But no pulling above 3,500 unless it is an emergency. So if you're not comfortable doing that, it may be a good idea to stand down, or at least make some jumps with the new rig first before going to Eloy. Bob Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  10. skylord

    Student wind restriction

    There is the legal restriction, but bottom line is up to you. Use the common sense you should have as an adult. If at the upper limit, evaluate the conditions: are the winds shifting, gusty, etc. If you feel uncomfortable, or feel you have to ask someone else, I would defer to being conservative. It is always much better to be on the ground wishing you were up there, versus being in the air wishing you never jumped. Bob Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  11. skylord

    Complete Rookie Question

    I'm new to this particular dz.com forum, and I've developed a feel for where I want to go in my little skydiving life. I have passions in skydiving. 1: My own 2: Teaching others tied with videography/photography of others As to the photog and vid stuff, I did amateur work in the 70's and 80's with stills for running clubs, and although I haven't done jack since then it is still a hobby. I suspect skydiving may be different. So, what equipment and requirements? How did you all get started? I kept jumping for two reasons. First was my TM, very close second was my video flyer. Bob Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  12. Doug, No worries. Thanks for the clarification. I just want to learn. I'll take my other questions to another thread or forum, but I appreciate your response. Bob Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  13. Sorry for my ignorance, but was this wrong? The two instructors track away from each other, the student deployed, so what should a videographer do different in this scenario? The only thing I can think of is if the student cuts away. Is that it? Thanks for enlightening me on this, I want to fly camera someday. Bob Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  14. skylord

    AFF 6

    I'm giving you the only advice I'm qualified to give: have fun!! Bob Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman
  15. skylord

    Perris Skyvan ?

    From talks with people involved in aircraft design, they actually design the control systems and locate it in such a way to minimize (not eliminate) the damage that can be done to them from a turbine blowing up, ie, they expect some debris to make it to the fuselage. Well, not exactly. I'm going to be replying to both your post and Billvon's. The DC-10 was never designed that way. Subsequent accidents involving the aircraft did lead to today's philosophy of routing hydraulics and other system critical items through different parts of the aircraft structure. Cases in point: -an accident in Turkey, I think, where the cargo bay door came open in flight at cruise altitude, and the cabin floor collapsed onto the control cables during the depressurization, jamming them in the nose down position. No way for hydraulics to compensate since the hard wired steel control cables ran underneath the cabin floor. -Chicago, 1979. Port engine comes off just after rotation. The separation tore all three hydraulic lines that were routed within inches of each other. Asymmetric retraction of slats, and a port wing stall caused the aircraft to roll left and crash even after the captain flew a flawless engine out procedure. -UAL232, tail engine blew apart, took out all hydraulics since it was an uncontained engine failure and it was the original design as to hydraulics (all lines within inches). With zero control, they used engine thrust to get back on the ground, something they never trained for. The Captain is Al Haynes, and his crew are forever heroes to me. No, the containment sleeve is not bulletproof. It is resistant, but under some circumstances will fail. There was a Delta MD-80 or DC-9 in Atlanta, I think, that killed a passenger and injured several others after the turbine came apart. Remember, these are hundreds of pounds of metal spinning at 25,000 plus RPM. And as another post alluded to, this can decide to leave through various exits. I had not heard of the LAX issue, and I am tracking down further details as best I can with my Air Traffic Control co-horts. Bob Marks "-when you leave the airplane its all wrong til it goes right, its a whole different mindset, this is why you have system redundancy." Mattaman