muff528

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Everything posted by muff528

  1. That is how it is in Canada. And yet we are not oppressed and have free elections. I agree, ...but try advocating that down here and you're branded a hateful racist. That is because motivation does matter. Election fraud is statistically non-existent in your current system. So why decide that now is the time that this is required? Didn't realize that Canada had such a problem with election fraud. Who knew! Uncanny how there are security threats only when Conservatives are booked to speak. Convenient, too. No ulterior motivation at Berkeley!
  2. That is how it is in Canada. And yet we are not oppressed and have free elections. I agree, ...but try advocating that down here and you're branded a hateful racist.
  3. Are you saying she isn't allowed on their property to speak? .....No Are they restricting access to her online content? Are her books not allowed on campus? .....No, but irrelevant The event is specifically being allowed. .....Not denying that Indeed sounds like her freedom to speak is being very much violated..... .....IMO, yep. Let's say you have the right to vote, but the Government is requiring you to get an ID first. It's worse than that.
  4. Is Coulter considered hateful? ..or just opposed to "Progressive, Liberal" ideology. Does her Conservatism automatically make her (or anyone else) hateful? Or has she spewed actual "hate speech" (racism, etc.) IOW, for example, I don't consider opposition to a particular government spending program or some other initiative to automatically be "hateful" or racist. I don't follow her so I don't really know...
  5. I've always advocated this. No better way to see who you're dealing with.
  6. We actually share some common ground here. But, notwithstanding the Oregon law, my specific point was that, while the bakery's actions *might* be interpreted by some as a violation of the gay couple's civil rights (I do not agree), I do agree that the actions of the University definitely *are* a violation of Coulter's Constitutional rights, and maybe the rights of the Conservative student group, too. Obviously, all my opinion. The "fine line" is whether discrimination (whether it is or is not unlawful) is a violation of rights. Also, whether the baker's civil rights are being violated. Getting deep in the weeds here.
  7. You mean like how the right reacted to the ranchers? You mean consistent like that? Or maybe how Republicans feel about Russia? You mean consistency like that? Or how about the consistency of family values, anti gay republicans get caught sucking dick, having affairs or hosting pedophiles at the white house? Yeah makes perfect sense for somebody on the right to complain about those on the left not being consistent. ^^ all irrelevant nonsense WRT this discussion. But in another thread we might find some agreement with some of those points. Berkeley is a Government institution. Preventing her from speaking (or unreasonable suppressing her ability to speak), especially at a place that ostensibly espouses the free flow of ideas is, IMO, the definition of Government suppression of the 1st Amendment. The latest I heard is that UCB has rescheduled her speech to May 2 between 1 and 3 pm, at an "undisclosed location". My understanding is that this is during "...'dead week,' when students aren't even in class". So, apparently they are allowing her to exercise her Constitutional 1st Amendment rights as long as no one can hear her. Apparently, this is not acceptable to the hosting student group, or their lawyer who is claiming that Berkeley "has a habit of shutting out Conservative speakers." "Coulter had been booked for April 27, but Berkeley administrators abruptly canceled her engagement on Wednesday, citing security concerns. After massive publicity, they reversed course but reset the event for May 2, when students will be taking finals and therefore will be less likely to attend, according to lawyers representing the Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation." ~The Hollywood Reporter. "Late Thursday, Harmeet K. Dhillon, a lawyer and the Republican National committeewoman from California, released a letter sent to UC Berkeley that indicates a lawsuit will be filed if the university does not allow Coulter's speech to go forward on April 27. The letter says that the sponsoring groups 'meticulously followed university protocol' in setting up Coulter's appearance, and that administrators' 'actions violate fundamental principles of free speech, equal protection and due process guaranteed by the United States Constitution.' Dhillon writes that the university’s counteroffer of May 2 was not good enough, in part because it would be in the middle of the day during a week when classes are not in session." ~ LATimes
  8. Speaking at a university isn't speaking publicly. Nobody is stopping Ann Coulter from reaching billions on the internet, or to stand on a corner and preach to the locals. Arguments from the righties on here seem similar to the case made by lefties re: "the gay wedding cake", ...i.e., the gay couple's civil rights were violated by the baker (a private enterprise) who refused to bake their wedding cake. Of course, the couple had many other options for getting their cake made and were not prohibited from exercising one of those options. So ...In this case, Coulter's rights are seemingly being violated by the school (a public institution) making it difficult for the students who invited her to meet certain "requirements" which might be unreasonable or unnecessary, and not required, for some other "acceptable" speaker. The argument from the left is that she could just pack up and go speak somewhere else. Therefore, no rights violated. Coulter's rights are not being violated. The baker was breaking the law. Indeed a very clear comparison. ....and there we have the fundamental (maybe even irreconcilable) difference between left and right here. BTW, the left's "breaking the law" argument might carry a little more weight if the concept was applied a little more consistently.
  9. Yes, they did. However, in the case cited, the baker ( who also had at least one option => provide the cake & keep the money ) was in violation of the laws of the State of Oregon. In this case, it was not a case of: Go somewhere else It was about violating the law. Jerry Baumchen Yes, a "violation of the laws of the State of Oregon". I suppose a case could be argued that those laws violate the civil rights of the baker. Obviously, opinions and interpretations differ either way. On the other hand, it appears that UCB (a California State institution) may have actually attempted to violate the US Constitution and the Constitutional civil rights of Coulter and the students who invited her by requiring unreasonable and unusual conditions to be met. I, personally, do not believe that private citizens, or entities, businesses, etc., can really actually violate a person's civil rights. My question would be whether the affected person can otherwise exercise his rights. A fine line there, and sometimes difficult to sort out individual cases. For an easy example, a person can be murdered and denied his Constitutional right to "life". Obviously, the disenfranchised person can't go somewhere else and not die after that. The killer then pays by losing his rights. The baker does not really have the power to prevent the wedding couple from getting a cake, just his cake. Any law forcing him to provide a cake is only as good as the prevailing interpretation of the Constitution (which may or may not change at some future time.) OTOH, Government entities do have the power to do that and they have; one of the more egregious and extreme examples being members of the US Congress publicly and explicitly (and disgustingly) prejudging and subverting the due process guaranteed a private citizen. UCB needs to permit the speaking engagement to proceed and to provide the necessary security and safety for the speaker and the sponsoring students, and whoever else wants to hear her. That would be to include arrests and prosecution of those who might violently dissent or otherwise commit violence. Civil penalties, too.
  10. Speaking at a university isn't speaking publicly. Nobody is stopping Ann Coulter from reaching billions on the internet, or to stand on a corner and preach to the locals. Arguments from the righties on here seem similar to the case made by lefties re: "the gay wedding cake", ...i.e., the gay couple's civil rights were violated by the baker (a private enterprise) who refused to bake their wedding cake. Of course, the couple had many other options for getting their cake made and were not prohibited from exercising one of those options. So ...In this case, Coulter's rights are seemingly being violated by the school (a public institution) making it difficult for the students who invited her to meet certain "requirements" which might be unreasonable or unnecessary, and not required, for some other "acceptable" speaker. The argument from the left is that she could just pack up and go speak somewhere else. Therefore, no rights violated.
  11. Wonder how long this program would last before the carrier realizes that we've been trained to pay them for the opportunity to leave the plane in flight.
  12. Yeah, I'd think that making the tunnel system useless would be more important than killing 36 fighters. Also, how would you know how many people are in the tunnel system at a given time. Seems a bit early have an accurate damage assessment when you can't see inside. Maybe not.
  13. Thought it might be something like that. But to make a single large "open-air" detonation worthwhile, they must have been reasonably sure that that particular cave network was fairly extensive and connected. I'd imagine that a ground-penetration bomb would mostly just collapse tunnels in a more localized (but maybe a still pretty large) area. Don't know.
  14. I was wondering the same thing, sorta. I'd like to see the rationale for using an above-ground-level detonation rather than a ground penetration. Comparison might make an interesting PBS Special...
  15. 2 hour delay + about 1 hour for the trip + maybe an hour FA time = ~4 hours. He could have driven in 4 or 5 hours.
  16. Oh, wow. Sorry, once that guy boarded it was too late. They need to put their crew member on a toilet or figure something else out. He can sit on the floor like we do.
  17. Meanwhile, I heard that Michael O'Leary beat a doctor unconscious and dragged him onto an under-booked Ryanair flight.
  18. I wonder what the "help" button does? It's for the handicapped, so an attendant will come help fuel your vehicle. Ahhh! ..."FUELING"! My bad!
  19. I wonder what the "help" button does?
  20. He was in that movie about skydiving surfers. :(
  21. stolen from the f-book:
  22. Pretty sure this wouldn't make the cut in family TV shows these days.
  23. If this gets really popular in China, they're gonna need to hire some flying traffic girls from North Korea to keep things flowing smoothly.
  24. Folk/Traditional from just about anywhere. Also, Appalachian. And 60s folk/rock or country/rock. e.g., Byrds, Poco, CSN, Flying Burrito Bros., etc. But, I'll listen to just about anything....