PixieUK

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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    150
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    160
  • AAD
    Vigil 2 Control Unit

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    LPS, Netheravon
  • License
    C
  • Licensing Organization
    BPA
  • Number of Jumps
    425
  • Tunnel Hours
    30
  • Years in Sport
    5
  • First Choice Discipline
    Formation Skydiving
  • First Choice Discipline Jump Total
    350
  • Second Choice Discipline
    Tunnel Flying
  1. PixieUK

    "That Guy"

    Where are you based that you are allowed to jump with headphones on playing music???? Pretty sure he wouldn't get through a UK flight line check with that!
  2. PixieUK

    BSBD Chris Carroll

    Wishing this wasn't true but raising a glass in his memory. Blue skies Chris - thanks for the kind words to a fledgling skydiver
  3. PixieUK

    Starting my AFF tomorrow

    Good luck! The best thing you can do to pass each level is relax - very easy to say and almost impossible to do! Take slow deep breaths in the plane as you are climbing to altitude, and a very deep breath just before you jump, and SMILE! It generates a physiological response in the body which will help release some tension - it is much easier to arch when you are as physically relaxed as possible. Go over the jump sequence in your head again and again and again (this will be covered fully in ground school - don't try to second-guess what they will teach you by asking on here, just be prepared to absorb the instructions). When you go over the sequence in your head, do the actions as well. You may want to tuck yourself into a corner for this because it will look a bit strange, but do it anyway! You want this to become as automatic as possible and the only way for that to happen is to practice as much as possible. There is a thread elsewhere that talks about waiting until the day following ground school to do the first jump in order to let the instructions sink in. I was given the choice and couldn't decide but in the end the weather decided for me. I'm sure that helped because I had more time to practice the whole jump sequence and I could probably have done it in my sleep by the time I did get to jump, lol. Each jump builds on the previous one, so it really is worth getting the sequence as fluid as possible. And don't worry if you don't pass every level first time. It is a huge amount of information to take in, and requires a lot of coordination and management of the physical and physiological responses of your body, whilst overcoming sensory overload! Have fun
  4. PixieUK

    New and new HELP

    I guess it depends on how severe your surgery was, whether it affects any other activities you do and how you personally feel about it. We really cannot advise you, you do need a medical opinion because you will need a medical form completing before you jump with that kind of history (or at least, you would in the UK, it may vary around the world). You should also consider whether jumping against your doctor's advice might invalidate any insurance cover You might want to post in the Tandem forum for considerations about the landings. The aim is usually for the tandem instructor's feet to touch down first (so you lift your legs up for landing), but slide landings are also common, particularly if winds are a bit high. Maybe consider the potential to the rest of your life if a landing goes wrong - obviously a risk to anyone who does a tandem jump, but given your surgery, you might be more prone to injury from a hard impact than someone who hasn't had surgery. If you decide the potential risk is worth it, then go back to your doctor and discuss it with him in more detail. Good luck!