evilivan

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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    109
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    113
  • AAD
    Cypres

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    UK DZs
  • License
    D
  • License Number
    100593
  • Licensing Organization
    BPA/FAI
  • Number of Jumps
    1850
  • Years in Sport
    11
  • First Choice Discipline
    Freefall Photography
  • Second Choice Discipline
    Freeflying

Ratings and Rigging

  • Pro Rating
    Yes
  1. evilivan

    Scary stories from the old days?

    Just read it. Thanks for sharing
  2. evilivan

    Skydive stories book

    Yep, I'd buy one. Make it available on Kindle please
  3. evilivan

    Scary stories from the old days?

    After several months of dipping in and out (don't say it...), I have finally - and regrettably - reached the end of this thread. Definitely the best thread ever - thank you all for sharing
  4. This I would highly recommend too, especially this time of year with additional (or "non-standard") clothing and thicker gloves etc. I have been unpleasantly surprised in the past as to where those handles can disappear to... Or how hard it is to get a grip on them with my winter gloves (that one I recommend finding out on the ground of course
  5. evilivan

    ~Now THAT's a Dust Devil!

    Thanks for clarifying... How is the old mucker?
  6. evilivan

    ~Now THAT's a Dust Devil!

    (EvilIvan voice) REPOST POLICE, FREEZE !! (/EvilIvan voice) Hey! I resemble that voice! "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent
  7. evilivan

    Decent Skydiving Movies?

    As already said, there are no "good" ones, but this is OK for a laugh: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0111400/ "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent
  8. evilivan

    Wounded Veteran/Triple Amp tandem

    Al Hodgson in the UK could also be of help - he lost both legs in Northern Ireland and is now one of the top freefly competitors / organisers / coaches in the UK. Not sure about his contact details but should be easy enough to track down through www.bpa.org.uk. Some info on him here (or just stick his name into Google): http://www.teamarmy.org/news/the-skydive-project/ "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent
  9. I would have liked to have seen your cartoons on your skydiving progress before I did my AFF - they reflect my experience almost perfectly...
  10. evilivan

    i killed myself today..

    ...why would you do that? Dude, he's a Cool HP Canopy Pilot, don't you know anything, ya gotta have the small rig (regardless of how tight) and open high or you'll die of embarrassment, before you pound in Silly me. "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent
  11. evilivan

    i killed myself today..

    ...why would you do that? "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent
  12. evilivan

    i killed myself today..

    I'll take that as a "no". "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent
  13. evilivan

    i killed myself today..

    Been lurking this Sangi / VB stuff; quite amazing that VB still won't allow himself to see it. Oh well. I predict it will either be a crater and a 'I told you so' that he hears, or a crater and a 'I told you so' that he doesn't... hoping for the former. Also interested to note that there isn't a big point being made of: - High rate of descent in the spin (high wingloading) - Very shaken up jumper - 2.5k feet to deal with a mal? At 'normal' opening height, that's a fatality right there VB: no idea who you are or how 'good' you are at landing your canopy, but the the way you dealt with that mal shows how little experience you have - and that jump numbers and experience DO have a role to play. Even if you can carve the course on your rears, you still need to be able to deal with your chosen wingloading in a mal scenario - and experience of dealing with mals on more forgiving wingloadings willl help with that. Experience and jump numbers won't guarantee you learn the lessons you need, but they will give you a much better chance all other things being equal. So as dramatic as it sounds, I think I agree with you: you died. Do you see that? Or was it just a dramatic headline for your post? Edited for typo "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent
  14. evilivan

    I've kinda decided that......

    Some do, some don't - I did for my femur injury but not for my tib/fib (I'm a little accident prone ); I would recommend you go entirely on your doctor's advice, although the 'if it bothers you' rule of thumb is also probably a good one. There can be complications if you have another injury with the metalwork in because it won't flex in the same way as bone. Ref: going back too early: DON'T! Wait until you are fully healed. Seriously. Not only will you probably put yourself back in the healing process (or worse, re-injure) it will also play on your mind and be a distraction just when you don't need one. Wait until you don't think about that leg at all... My $0.02. "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent
  15. evilivan

    Old School..

    Did those $20 jumps after your 7th include rig hire and repack? If not, that's pretty expensive isn't it...? "If you can keep your head when all around you have lost theirs, then you probably haven't understood the seriousness of the situation." David Brent