CanuckInUSA

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  • Reserve Canopy Size
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  • Home DZ
    A homeless hop n' pop swooper
  • License
    D
  • License Number
    26396
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    1600
  • First Choice Discipline
    Swooping
  • First Choice Discipline Jump Total
    1300
  • Second Choice Discipline
    BASE Jumping
  • Second Choice Discipline Jump Total
    81

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  1. I won't ever question Luke (and his team) spotting skills. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  2. For sure once the turn starts there are moments where blind spots occur and space that appeared to be open in one moment of time can rapidly become occupied. Swooper friendly DZs need to place their swoop parks away from their other LZs to limit the conflicting traffic like when a low timer messes up their approaches. But the lower timers will always make mistakes as they learn to fly their canopies and we don't want them making low turns if their safety is in question. However with all that said, I think we can all agree that people not intending on swooping need to do their best to avoid the airspace in the vicinity of swoop parks. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  3. It saddens me to say that I am a retired competitive swooper (I just could not stay current with my swooping ever since I moved back to the much short jump seasons here in Canuckistan), but as a former competitive swooper I can tell you that during our swoop comps we were often on separate loads than the rest of the DZ was on. So you can never assume if you are the last person on your load to land, that there isn't a group of jumpers just above you setting up. So going for the gates wasn't the smartest thing to do. But if you messed up your approach on this one jump you messed it up and it is much better for you to land in the safest possible area instead of doing something stupid like making a low turn to avoid the swoop park. The lower canopy always has the right of way and it is the responsibility of the swooper (even if they are in the middle of a competition) to make sure they abort their swoop if there is conflicting traffic. I know it was a pain in the rear end, but in all the swoop comps I was in, the swooper was given a do over if they had to abort their swoop due to traffic. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  4. CanuckInUSA

    Eldon Burrier

    It's been reported that Eldon Burrier was the tandem instructor who passed away with his student this last weekend in a Cape Cod skydiving accident. http://www.myfoxboston.com/story/26648470/skydiving-instructor-and-student-killed-in-accident-on-cape http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=4674104;sb=post_latest_reply;so=ASC;forum_view=forum_view_collapsed;;page=unread#unread I met and competed against Eldon in a number of swoop comps (PST and well as PacNW CPC comps) during the summer of 2006. Eldon definitely had a wild side to him. You could always count on him to go big or go home. But he was also fun guy to be around. Condolences to Eldons close friends and family. BSBD Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  5. CanuckInUSA

    I'm 14. Would you let me pack for you???

    A skydiving main canopy? Sure why not. After all, it is a parachute and it wants to open. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  6. CanuckInUSA

    Katie swoops into moving car

    Katie Hansen ... she also appears at the 0:20 second mark in the video referenced below doing a roll over at the Perrine Bridge http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsZwpqk6MUs Yes I know, a shameless plug for an old, but still fun video. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  7. CanuckInUSA

    Katie swoops into moving car

    That's awesome. I met Katie 10 years ago when she, myself and a bunch of other peeps were getting into BASE. At that time I don't think she had any ambitions for swooping. But I see she has become a swooper, and not only become a swooper, but she has become an awesome swooper. Good job. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  8. My condolences to John's friends and family. Eden North is a good DZ. It's sad to have to deal with this event. BSBD. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  9. CanuckInUSA

    Freddie Cabanas

    Cool videos. BSBD Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  10. CanuckInUSA

    Pay for a coach....WTF???

    If you want to find a good coach you need to expect to make some sacrifices in order to obtain this coaching. But you are being obtuse if you think they don't exist. The fellow I received my advanced coaching from, meets this criteria you outlined. He is a better than awesome canopy pilot, he is a fucking good teacher and he is very much a professional. I had to travel for my coaching, had to pay money for hotels and car rentals (not to mention money for jumps and of course money for the coach). But it was all worth it. The knowledge I received from the coach was priceless (oh and I did this coaching on more than one occasion). Due to the fact that I can no longer stay current since returning to Canuckistan, I have had to not only retired as a competition level swooper, but I also regretfully retired as a swooper. Swooping rocks, but you need to stay current if you don't want to crater. If you survive your next 1000 jumps, maybe you will come to understand what this all means. Until then, know this, "You are entering the most dangerous phase of your jumping career and there are a ton of people who know a heck of a lot more about this than you do". I am not trying to be an asshole here, just trying to state the facts. Been there, done that. PS: to the OP of this thread, good on you for seeking your coaching and recognizing the value these coaches can offer the "trial and error" swoopers. Welcome to the world of enhanced knowledge of what to do up there. Just remember while knowledge is key, even the best can find themselves in the corner and the sooner you recognize you are in the corner on a given jump, the better your chances of survival are. The margin for errors in swooping is slime to nil. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  11. CanuckInUSA

    Jim Dishroon

    I was not aware that he jumped into Normandy. Dang if I had know this I would have loved to talked to him about it more. I guess "my bad" for not putting two and two together. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  12. CanuckInUSA

    Jim Dishroon

    I remember Jim from my days when I jumped in CO. BSBD Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  13. CanuckInUSA

    Jonathan Tagle

    My condolences to Jonathan's friends and family. BSBD Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  14. CanuckInUSA

    Swoop indicators - Was: fatality at Perris.

    Exactly ... you have the ever changing dynamic sight picture as you dive and as you turn and then at some point in time what I refer to as "your spider senses" kick in and it tells you to complete the turn and initiate the recover phase. As a swooper you know this happens pretty quickly and the last thing you need is some device distracting you. Technology can be very helpful giving you information prior to your turn. But once you have committed to the diving turn it's all up to the swoopers eye sight and their experience to recognize the situation they have put themselves in and react accordingly. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over
  15. I understand. It's easy for us to point out the mistakes from the safety of our homes and it's another matter dealing with the incident first hand. To prove I am human and have made mistakes under pressure. To date I have had three reserve rides. On malfunction #1 I threw both handles. On malfunction #2 I threw away my cutaway handle. It wasn't until malfunction #3 that I managed to hold on to both handles. But don't forget to flat turn (it doesn't hurt to practice on each jump). Flat turns could be a life saver if you find yourself looking at a tight landing area. Once again good job surviving your incident. Try not to worry about the things you have no control over