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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/28/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Please see this guys post in the main forum, we shouldn't be encouraging him to show up anywhere. There is a golf bag in his future , but in the mean time it really wouldn't be fair to the drop zone that we guided him to.
  2. 4 points
    So funny clicking this link all these years later to see that Squirrel completely and utterly dominate the PPC charts... Hahahaha
  3. 3 points
    Yep this guy is a f u c k w i t as we Brits say.
  4. 2 points
    Hello everyone I'd like to introduce awesome summer location with all possible facilities on site. Multiple aircrafts, Hotel from 15$ for bunk house to 50$ per night for bungalow, nice restaurant with home made Russian food, wind tunnel 24/7 from 100$ per hour on site with view of landing area, jump altitude is always 14000ft. All rental equipment is brand new Javelins and Icons. We work with Sigma tandems only. Transfer Price 2018 | Start skydive season in May month SKYDIVE 1 slot = 1300₽ ( ~20$ ) AFF Program– the full cost of the course 65.000 ₽ ( ~1000$ ), the course fee includes 30 minutes of flight time in wind tunnel. Windtunnel per 1 hour Prime time – 11.000₽ (~180$) Day – 9.000₽ (~140$) Night – 7,000₽ ( ~110$) Coach 5000₽ per 1 hour Ih you want a block time - Pay 10 hour + 1 bonus Special offers for group.Peace, love and freeflying to you all
  5. 2 points
    Well since you are fucking deaf you would not realize how loud the Skyvan is, it is "deafening", therefore the "Dive 'til you're deaf".
  6. 2 points
    In the last 10 years I’ve seen or been on the jump at big way events where at least 6 AAD activations have occurred because of low openings. In that time I know of at least 2 AFF students losing height awareness resulting in AAD activation whilst I was on the DZ. it does happen more often than reported.
  7. 1 point
    Which makes it sound like it is not actually TSO'd (although I can't tell for sure from this info). It sounds like they used the TSO list of requirements, and did drop tests etc. to satisfy Australian requirements. That could be reassuring to an Australian customer. BUT... the gear wasn't actually entered into the US TSO system. Nor is there any sign that an Australian part 103.18 certification is automatically accepted as equivalent to a TSO by the US. Then you get into the issue, "But what if one is talking about a PA rig that was a license built copy of a US TSO'd Rigging Innovations rig?" That's certainly worth something to a jumper, but if it isn't actually produced in a TSO approved production facility, then it still can't count as having a TSO even if the design is TSO'd. (As a similar example, for one Canadian rig that was TSO'd, it was done through Transport Canada according to bilateral agreements with the FAA, so the FAA accepts it. So it has a real FAA TSO. Then the production plans and facility were approved & inspected so that it was run on a TSO approved production line. Years later, the company owner gave up the formal TSO certification as he wasn't selling many to the US anyway, so it wasn't worth the money to pay for the inspections the Canadian authorities were doing for the production line. A jumper can be reassured that the design actually went through all TSO tests which were accepted by the US, even if a current production rig doesn't actually have a TSO. An earlier rig could be jumped by a US resident, but the current ones can't.) Correct me if I'm wrong about TSO'd production lines -- I'm a bit hazy on that aspect and what formal terminology applies.
  8. 1 point
    Not when some manufacturers are no longer servicing their own gear past 20 years. For myself, it became as much a question of where I drew the line on liability as much as function. I jump with a reserve that's over 20, but I've also had a long talk with that mfg and its on my back (no one else's). And FWIW, while I have helped folks purchase gear, and technically Strong has me on their books as a dealer, I am not in the business of selling gear. Just my $.02 JW
  9. 1 point
    In response to the new BSR that the BOD just passed, I'm curious how many have had or witnessed an AAD fire last year? Out of those, how many were by instructors? Please no names or places at this time Thanks
  10. 1 point
    They seem to be a lot more common than one would think. Cypress' website says ' The first life saved by a CYPRES dates back to April of 1991. Since then, more than 4,000 lives have been saved!'. Vigil reports 329 saves so far. Not sure how many MARS has. I have not personally witnessed an AAD fire, but I've talked to a few instructors who have.