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  1. 2 points
    I have heard that tying the chest strap around & through the reserve handle will prevent this sort of thing. There are other ways, but the potential of locking the reserve handle in place is reduced by using the chest strap.
  2. 2 points
    I've always carried mine on because I'm afraid of what could happen if TSA has unsupervised access to my handles. I have a rig sleeve, usually remove my hook knife but forgot last time I flew (about a month ago) and made it through both Denver and San Diego without any issues. About 6 years ago at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway a TSA agent attempted to lift my old rig by the metal reserve ripcord as it came out of the scanner. The reserve pilot chute hit the floor but the free bag didnt move and I was able to carry it on in a trash bag. Thankfully i was heading home from Eloy or that really could have been a trip spoiler. The agent apologized and the supervisor had me fill out a form that got me a check to pay for a repack. I have a Curv now with pillows and the rig sleeve has velcro stretch covers that wrap around the cutaway and reserve handles.
  3. 2 points
    Be aware security may demand you open the main and reserve. It does not matter if you have the X-ray cards and USPA letter and all, they can demand it and you can't expect to change their mind. Be aware that carrying your rig around exposed might cause some nervous Nellie to get security involved. No matter how cool it might seem to get on a commercial flight with your rig on your back, it draws unwanted attention and could result in skydivers being treated worse in the future.
  4. 1 point
    I traveled to about 5 countries this summer and always carried my on and use a rig sleeve. It has the little handle covers, so I don't worry about someone pulling one by accident. Usually they'll just swab it and nothing more. I think the 2 biggest issues I ran into was one TSA agent didn't know what to do and called her supervisor over and he just said it's fine and waived me threw. I never had an issue with any security. I had a bigger worry of other passengers who like to try to shove their oversized carry-ons into bins that aren't big enough or have enough room left and crush everyone else's shit. Most people just think it's a big backpack.
  5. 1 point
    I always carry mine and check the knife. There is no reason to carry your rig without putting it inside a general backpack type of container. TSA will give it a look and generally pass you through to the swab table and then say thanks... Don't make a big deal about it and they won't either. Everyone on the airplane does not need to know that you jump out of airplanes... I also check my weight belt.
  6. 1 point
    Robert, you are not honest about a lot of things. lets start at the beginning. you told everyone on this thread Skipp contacted you. that was false. you laid claims the house was bought for cash. that's was incorrect. the funny part was showing a mortgage while stating it was a cash deal One of your witnesses even said Kenny paid cash for the house. how could that be true. then the DNA fable and the 10 bucks for a lot. it goes on and on. we corrected you over the years and it irritates you to no end being wrong. it has nothing to do with being slanted. you asked for years for people to look into your story. well, that's what we did..
  7. 1 point
    Tom Colbert fell prey to confirmation bias and motivated reasoning. But, he’s hardly alone for those with favorite suspects in the Cooper case.
  8. 1 point
    Ok, this is confusing to me. Did we watch the same broadcast? The History Channel DB Cooper doc was two separate tracks. One was Tom Colbert’s research on Rackstraw. The second separate track was Jepsen and Fuentes researching the story. At the end, Colbert believed it was Rackstraw, Colbert and Jepsen did not. The documentary was not a vehicle to push Rackstraw as a candidate. I met Jepsen and Fuentes when they interviewed Vicki ( which was not included in the broadcast). They did not have any preconceived notions at all. In fact, they hadn’t done any research about the case in advance at all. But, it was not a pro-Rackstraw broadcast. If anything it was the opposite.
  9. 1 point
    Well thanks! I rarely ventured into SC back in the day except by accident! Nice to see you! I found some pics of RevJim on my computer and made me think of everyone else.
  10. 1 point

    THIS ADVERT HAS EXPIRED!

    • FOR SALE
    • USED

    Selling a SOLO II audible altimeter and case. Asking $50 or best offer.

    $50.00

  11. 1 point
    Show up, ask at the front desk if there's anyone looking to jump with other newbies. It might be a newbie, and it might be an old fart who likes jumping with newbies. Slow days increase your chance of jumping with the same person twice is more likely, and doing that will really make it easier for you to figure out what you're doing, so that you can either do more or less of it. But slow days decrease your chance of having someone at all -- ask at the front desk if there are people whom you normally should be looking for. Be honest that you can't afford to pay for coaching right now. And if you can afford to stay at the end of the day, do so, listen, and feel free to contribute beer if it's needed. There's no guarantees, but it beats nothing. Wendy P. (old fart who likes jumping with newbies)
  12. 1 point
    This thread started with a simple product announcement … perhaps not within the letter of dz.com policy, but almost harmless. If the OP used "fucking sexy ass skydivers" as a verb, that is correct English, Dutch, etc. However the choice of vocabulary might offend some of the delicate flowers in the audience. Back in the good-old-days, skydivers were lewd, crude, vulgar, etc. and the dz was a safe place to vent our frustration with the "real world." many skydivers prided themselves on their "dirty biker" image. Sadly, most dzs have become more and politically-correct during this century. Boring! I have used skydiving as a cure for depression for almost 40 years. I started as a sport jumper back when sex was safe and skydiving was dangerous. Sadly, I was kicked out of the skydiving crowd after a plane crash. Bullies started the pushing, then my boss parked airplane wreckage where I had to look at every day on my way to work, then lawyers insisted on dragging out a simple lawsuit for 8.5 years. The odd thing was that I worked hard at physical rehabilitation during the year immediately after the crash. I could not explain clearly why I was working so hard, just knew that I had to "get back on the horse." I only lasted a year and a half until the airplane wreckage was permanently parked near the airplane gate. Since then I have been diagnosed as: insomniac, anxious, depressed,acid reflux, heart murmur, PTSD, etc. I have read dozens of books about PTSD and earlier today watched Sebastian Junger's videos on PTSD. Hopefully this new book offers advice on how to recover from that sort of long-term depression.
  13. 1 point
    Lawyers have a high rate of misery compared to other professions. A 2-second google search revealed that attorneys have the 11th highest suicide rate by occupation. I'm sad that people immediately piled on the OP. I suspect skydiving has saved a LOT of people from depression, and I think there is HUGE value in people sharing openly about their struggles with mental health. That's undermined when people are jerks to each other when they could just as easily say nothing.
  14. 1 point
    Hey! I hope you decide to come back and get to know some of the people here. Erroll, like his avatar, tends to be a grumpy person. Every DZ has at least one! And Skybytch is maybe one of the most thoughtful posters on here; always with good intentions. It's a pretty small group and sometimes things might seem to be heated, but I don't think there's a person on here that I wouldn't jump with, and crack a beer with afterward. I will look for your book; I don't have any fucking problem with fucking profanity!
  15. 1 point
    One fine morning a family of moles was looking out their burrow. Daddy mole took a deep breath and said "I smell pancake syrup." Mama mole took a deep breath and said "I smell honey." Baby mole tried to poke his head out but couldn't because the bigger moles were in the way and said "All is can smell is molasses."
  16. 1 point
    As a professional tandem instructor, whose job is to provide a safe experience for my student, I wonder why you would think this? I am able to easily communicate with my student in the airplane, I am protected in freefall, I have a logical place for my audible, and I am easily able to open my full face helmet to communicate during the canopy portion of the skydive. I am also able to close my helmet in the unlikely event that the student is sick or has body fluids streaming from them during the canopy portion, so I can land them safely without distraction. I have done tandems both ways, and after thousands of tandems, my belief is that the full face is the professional choice, though I understand others choose differently. What are your specific issues with using them? Other than “total bullshit”? And your level of experience would be interesting as well, just to see how that might play into your thought process? Not being argumentative, just truly curious. Edited: Just looked at some of your other posts. Nevermind, sorry to feed the trolls.
  17. 1 point
    I stand by my opinion on this matter. Five years, tens of thousands of dollars, and nothing. -JD-
  18. 1 point
    I had a fusion, L4-S1, in 2001 at 36 years old. Was back in the air after a year of recovery. I did have a good surgeon though, who understood and thought I'd be okay jumping again. He was right. Don't retire if you still feel the need to be in the air. Just adjust your skydiving to reduce the risk of additional injury. I'd suggest upsizing a bit and possibly changing to a less aggressive canopy but that's just me. I'm 54 and jump a Spectre with dacron lines at a low wingloading. Super soft openings, easy landings. It's not a sports car, but I'm less likely to get hurt flying it than with any other canopy I've flown, especially if I don't stay current. If you prefer a 9 cell, there are a few out there that have a reputation for soft openings. <standard disclaimer> I am not a doctor </standard disclaimer> Check with your surgeon to be sure it's had enough time to heal. If the answer is yes, well, you know what to do
  19. 1 point
    This brought me a smile. My first reserve ride was on a 26' Navy Conical that was four years older than I was.
  20. 1 point
    In another thread someone mentioned only needing whichever canopy was safest and it got me curious about when canopy development would have ground to a halt if we had stopped there. I really wasn't trying to dump on small canopies.
  21. 1 point
    The question is, "So what parachute do you remember, or have now, that made you worry the least?" I guess that would be my most often used canopy nowdays, my Flight Concepts fully zero porosity Manta, a rectangular design, at 290 square feet. But I have had others, mainly large canopies. (This seems to be a common theme among those responding.) The big ones are not the most exciting, but they sure can be reliable.
  22. 1 point
    this is what I have been using https://www.betterbraces.com/donjoy-legend-se-4-knee-brace "Where troubles melt like lemon drops, away above the chimney tops, that's where you'll find me" Dorothy
  23. 1 point
    I arrived during Voss Freefly Festival. What a pity !! (I could just stay a few days there during a trip - not the entire week as freeflyers do) There were no 1-day-fee to allow people like me to jump during this time. So... either pay a 150 $ fee for maybe 5 or 6 jumps... ...or don't. I didn't ! People from the staff didn't look so interested in welcoming me or other people for a few jumps as they were in money. Too sad. But the place is really scenic!
  24. 1 point
    Man, just when I thought I knew all the players. Exit Composites Looks like they make some very "familiar" looking camera helmets They do make an SLR box. This is the first I have ever seen anything of the sorts but sure others have done it. Exit Composites Boxes The box looks like it fits an xsi, but it does not really say camera body/lens combo. I feel it's, kinda a waste of $ if ur top mounting, but its cool to see and I'm sure it has a place. They also make a box for that sanyo pal/ntsc sytle camera thingy... For an idea of pricing parachut.fr distributes them and I'm sure a few others... Seems like they are from Argentina. -Trunk HYPOXIC
  25. 1 point
    hello, this is for my first rig, and I'm trying to figure out what the dolphin has/doesn't have against the Wings rig. On this website, http://www.para-service.com/ the dolphin 2000 is listed a $790, and the wings would be $840. Also as part of the package, i would get a Tempo reserve from PISA, and a 9-cell ZP Hornet main. Are those good canopies for beginners, the wingload will be close to 1.0 if not less. Thanks alot for your guys/gals advice, you save me from the frustration that comes with shopping.