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OG-Tahiti

FlySight GPS

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I'm sorry for the spam...


Never mind, I like your spam ;)


Yea seriously... you're making something a lot of people appreciate, I don't think anybody minds being told of a new version with shiny new features! :PB|
Costyn van Dongen - http://www.flylikebrick.com/ - World Wide Wingsuit News

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I'm sorry for the spam, but this will actually be the last one I'll post here.



If carlsberg made spam.. (not sure if this will be appreciated outside the UK or not)

I can't wait to get home and try your viewer out. Thanks for programming it and thanks for posting !!
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The FlySight firmware source and schematics (as well as source code for the two viewers) are now available on the following GitHub page:

http://github.com/flysight/flysight

In addition, I've started a user/developer wiki here:

http://flysight.ca/wiki

For the moment, changes to the main development branch are moderated through "pull requests". The plan is to keep the main branch fairly lean for now. Additional features can be developed in a separate fork, and easily incorporated into the main branch later on if need be. What I have in mind is to add a page on the wiki where additional compiled firmwares can be listed and shared.

Feel free to PM me with questions/comments.

Michael



Very awesome of you.

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The FlySight firmware source and schematics (as well as source code for the two viewers) are now available on the following GitHub page:

http://github.com/flysight/flysight

In addition, I've started a user/developer wiki here:

http://flysight.ca/wiki

For the moment, changes to the main development branch are moderated through "pull requests". The plan is to keep the main branch fairly lean for now. Additional features can be developed in a separate fork, and easily incorporated into the main branch later on if need be. What I have in mind is to add a page on the wiki where additional compiled firmwares can be listed and shared.

Feel free to PM me with questions/comments.

Michael



Very awesome of you.



Agreed, very cool that you post all the details of your hard work for everyone to poke at and play with. I hope many more good things come of this really cool project!
Costyn van Dongen - http://www.flylikebrick.com/ - World Wide Wingsuit News

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Just thought I'd share a couple of jump logs.

I've only recently started wingsuiting (just 30 w/s jumps) and I'm really enjoying it. As I've just started I thought the flysight would be really handy to get my flying position dialled in.

And it did.

On jump 219 I had the flysight switched on but I couldn't hear the tones to help me out.

Before jump 221 I switched from an in-helmet speaker to earphones and could hear the tones quite easily.

You can see the difference in the glide rate !

I think as a newb that this is really going to help me out :)
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Hi :)

If your looking for an easy free way to analyze your jump data, this might help.

I have been using openoffice to analyze my logs. openoffice is a free office suite, you can easily google and download it. I have been using a template to quickly copy and paste new jump logs into the spreadsheet and instantly have all the data and graph presented.

Currently you can see top and average glide ratio, horizontal speed and total speed, as well as average and minimum vertical speeds. Also a graph displays vertical, horizontal and total speeds, as well as glide ratio to time. You can also see total distance traveled (ground track of actual flight path). Units are feet and km. If anyone is interested in different units or measurements, id be very happy to help.

To use it, first download and install open office, just google it quickly. also download the file flysight template.ods attached.

Get a csv file you want analyzed. open it in notepad and locate where the jump begins by looking for the altitude dropping when you leave the aircraft, and where it ends by looking at the vertical speed for deployment. Delete everything above and below it, except the first two lines that hold the titles and units, and save the file, as a new file if you want to keep the original jump complete.

Now open this csv file in calc, and just hit ok on the dialog box that pops up. Click column D, and then shift click column G. Copy these four columns. Open the attached file, flysight template.ods, also in Calc. Select column B and hit paste. That's it. Now scroll right to column Q and you will see all the data and the graph.

If the graph has too much or two little time in it you can change the length of the x axis (time) by double clicking the graph, double clicking the x axis and under scale changing maximum to reflect how long the jump is in seconds.

Save the file under a different name, or select just the interesting bits and export selection as pdf.

Enjoy :)

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A friend gave me a viso wrist strap, they come with two kinds I think so very likly some one around you has one. I secured the unit to the straps with some strong adhesive tape that comes off cleanly should the need arise. I wear it like an alti on my right hand and route the phones through the suit.

I like it this way for a few reasons. Firstly I have easy access to plug and unplug the phones and still see the light to know i have a signal. I can plug it in seconds before jumping and plug it out once i have a good canopy. I can also attach it to the door bar so it has a signal all the way up regardless of where i sit. I had it inside and outside my helmet with good results but not as comfortable. Inside the helmet just like an audible, outside by securing it with tape to some bungee cord and routing it through any hole in your helmet. The unit doesnt weigh anything, no need to screw it in place i think

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I probably went overboard but..

I put a 2" wide strip of selotape on the back of my helmet and on the bottom of the flysight.

I got my hot glue gun out and put two lines of hot glue onto the selotape on the helmet. I then pushed the flysight down onto the still warm glue. This gave me a nice removable flexible flat suface to mount the flysight on. Removed the selotape from the flysight.

I then just used a couple of slim strips of gaffa tape that allows me to see the led and to also plug the usb lead in.

I ran the headphone lead down the back of the helmet and gaffa taped over it. Removed the padding from the helmet and looped the earphone wire inside.

Only took about 5 mins.
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I've just been using a couple of strips of gaffer's tape over the FlySight, securing it on the back of the helmet with connectors facing down. I punch a couple of small holes for the switch and audio jack, then route the headphone cord under the bottom of the helmet.

I've heard about a few different mounting solutions. Someone in Europe, apparently, is making a small pouch, and others have used a u-shaped piece of lexan with a Velcro strap around it.

I've got a prototype on the way of what I hope will be a low profile, secure mount, but I'll have to do some testing with the prototype before I mass produce it.

Michael

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3M dual lock velcro on the back of my helmet



I was pretty impressed with the strength of Dual Lock when I tested it. The only thing to be aware of is that it wears a lot more rapidly than Velcro. The stronger variants, in particular, have a specified life of something like 20-50 cycles.

Michael

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I gaffer taped mine onto the back of my helmet and picked up some cheap motorcycle helmet headphones for 20 bucks. I cut one of them off and put the other in my audible pocket. The wire is all inside the helmet so I can easily grab it without forgetting the headphones. It is easy to feel the switch before exit and after opening.

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Didn't see this asked yet, but what do you think about the unit having it's own piezo speaker like a ProTrack, so that ear buds are not needed? I have a helmet that accommodates two audibles, and this could occupy the second slot. I've been thinking about getting one of these, just not too keen on the ear buds and associated wiring. At least not for routine use (ie. grab your helmet and go).

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So instead of having a wire going from the outside of the helmet and in to your ear, you want a wire going from your ear to the outside of the helmet.
OK. :o

I can guess that it will be harder to tell a difference from the different tones the Flysight makes if you have to mix it with outide windnoise.
Using those noisecanceling earbuds works real good at blocking wind.

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Haha. No wires would need to go into the helmet (or ears). Just a short wire running outside the helmet, from the GPS to the ext ant. The piezo speaker of the GPS (if there was one) would sound through the helmet ports like the ProTrack does. I have enough crap to deal with on jump run (with ws, video, etc) and don't need to add donning ear buds to the list, plus having wires with some slack to snag. Or it might be simpler to mount the GPS on top, and run a wire to a single speaker at the audible port on the helmet. I think "noise cancelling earbuds" aren't really necessary, as it's not like it's music. Just need to hear the tones, like I already easily can from the audible.

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I got a fifteen minute call from manifest on arriving at the DZ - I put my helmet down, switched the flysight on and left it to get a signal whilst I switched the cypress on in the rig and in the time it had taken to do that the flysight had a gps lock. I switched it off and forgot about it until 9k when I switched it back on.

On the other hand once I'd geared up I had to take the sidepad out of my helmet, find my pro track, power that up, check the alarm settings, put it back in the pocket, put the sidepad back in the helmet and head for the plane.

The flysight is on the back of my helmet, nice and easy to switch on. All I do at 9k is switch it on, wait for a lock (a few seconds normally), rest my helmet on the top of my head, put the earpiece in, helmet down, clip the helmet buckle and I'm ready to jump.

Then when I land I just reach round and I can feel the off switch easy enough.

For me it's easier that the flysight is on the back of the helmet as I can see the lights, I don't have to fish it out of the pocket etc etc.
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Ah, that's the difference. I have a helmet with dual audible slots on the OUTSIDE (NVertigo). So I just turn it on in the morning and forget about it. No pads to remove, etc. So the GPS would also be external. Whatever works for you. I just prefer to not have earbuds in, especially with the wire running out to the GPS. Nuf said, nice unit in any case. Thanks, Michael for developing it!

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