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Hooknswoop

So, You Want to Be a Rigger?

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thanks so much for the information. i'm very new to this, i've only made a few jumps in my AFF training but i'm very interested in being able to work for this sport and rigging appeals to me. you have helped me so much as well as a few other questions and comments that others have posted to this topic.
again, thank you!

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Hee! Hee!
My apprentice has decided that she does not like packing U.S. Air Force surplus B-12 containers.
What is her point?
Those things were the heighth of fashion back when I was a student - in 1977!
Hah! Hah!



LOL... fortunately for her, you're probably the only person that will make her pack one!

:)

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Quote

Hee! Hee!
My apprentice has decided that she does not like packing U.S. Air Force surplus B-12 containers.
What is her point?
Those things were the heighth of fashion back when I was a student - in 1977!
Hah! Hah!



LOL... fortunately for her, you're probably the only person that will make her pack one!

:)



>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The only reason I taught her how to pack military surplus containers is because the local DPRE insisted on it. Mr. Farrington said that he wanted to see a variety of different types of containers in a prospective rigger's logbook when she arrives for testing. In that case he would just ask her to repack a popular sport rig, then get on with the rest of the oral and practical test, Mr. Farrington also explained that if she showed up with only Javelins and Ravens in her logbook, then she would be asked to repack the ugliest and rattiest rig in his attic.
Dave DeWolf put me through that routine when I tested for my FAA Senior Rigger rating. Since my logbook contained mostly Phantoms and 26 foot LoPos packed into Wonderhogs and Racers, he pulled some ugly antiques out of his attic. Hee! Hee!

The bottom line is that anyone holding an FAA Senior Rigger rating - with a back endorsement - is legally allowed to repack ANY back type parachute that enters her loft.

On a practical note, I advised my apprentice to laugh at any rig more than 20 years old, any round reserve from the acid mesh era, etc.. There are not enough hours in the year for her to learn how to repack every antique container. She has to draw the line somewhere and I suggested drawing the line at 20 years.

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A CSPA Rigger A Course is scheduled for 22 - 27 March, 2004 at the Kamloops Parachute Club in British Columbia, Canada.
Sign up cost is roughly CAN $325, but you will have to supply your own textbooks. Hint, contact Poynter Publishing.
Since a prospective CSPA Rigger A only has to pack half as many reserves (10), Americans might consider this a good warm-up for their FAA Senior Rigger test.
While we are on the subject of rigging courses, when are Dave DeWolf, Tom Dolphin, etc. planning their next Senior Rigger coruses?

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The CSPA Rigger A Course in Kamloops, BC is officially set for 22-27 March 2004. Cost is CAN$350 plus materials.
Nick Stetzenko is the Course Coordinator and can be contacted at:
Kamloops Skydivers
Box 1466
Kamloops, BC
Canada V2C 6L8

Like I said earlier, a CSPA Rigger A needs to know 3/4 as much as an FAA Senior Rigger. I am willing to write letters of recommendation to the FAA for above-average candidates.

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Great report indeed.

One of the requirements mentioned
is that you should have packed at least 20 parachutes of each type you seek a rating,
I suppose that by type they actually mean the area, Back, chest, lap and seat.
In the netherlands you have to pack really different types (like other Brands), and when you want to keep the license you have to pack 20 different types a year.
Plus you have to be a trainee for at least a year at a riggers loft (here mostly the lofts doesn't pay for all the work you do.)

Working a year as a trainee is no problem for me.
Packing 20 reserves is no problem also.
Hence even the repairs is a piece of cake,
Hold the abuses please, this is not because I think I'm god, But I've been working at a military rigger loft for more than 13 years.
But at my work we have only 4 types of reserves

1 chest (for round static line jumps)
1 for HaHo/HaLo
1 Instructors
1 Tandem

So I would have to pack 16 different types of reserves every year just to get, and keep my civilian license

Now I'm thinking of getting my USA Rigger license (senior or master)
Because I'm a military rigger Section 65.117 Military Riggers or Former Military Riggers: Special
Certification Rule should apply,
But I think it's useless if I still have to repack 20 different types a year.
Can you tell me whether this rule is the same like explained above or is it only for the examination ?

BTW
As you might have noticed my primary language isn't english, so if any grammatical (illogical, or even foolish) error have occured, please forgive me for that....

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The 20 reserve pack jobs have to be of the same type, i.e chest, back, seat, or lap. 19 chest and 1 back doesn't meet the requirements.

To be a current rigger, you have to "exercise the privileges of your certificate within 90 days”. So, if you are not current, you simply pack something or supervise someone and you are current. Which, honestly, is kind of silly. It makes it so there are no real currency requirements. There is no renewal requirements.

I don’t know if foreign military riggers fall under the Special Certification Rule, you would have to contact the FAA.

Derek

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Thanks Derek.

Those requirements will be met with ease.
Before we had a chest reserve of wich I pack almost 40 a day, now we have a new type of wich I pack just about 17 a day B|.
Surely the square reserves won't be any problem neither.
The 26 ft. LoPos (with diaper) mentioned earlier in this thread were pack pretty fast also, even the MT1XX could be done in a week (the total for the requirements that is)
the part about foreign armed forces is checked
Quote


Sec. 65.117 Military riggers or former military riggers: Special
certification rule.

In place of the procedure in Sec. 65.115, an applicant for a senior
parachute rigger certificate is entitled to it if he passes a written test on
the regulations of this subpart and presents satisfactory documentary
evidence that he--
(a) Is a member or civilian employee of an Armed Force of the United
States, is a civilian employee of a regular armed force of a foreign country,
or has, within the 12 months before he applies, been honorably discharged or
released from any status covered by this paragraph;



But I was unaware of the part you mentioned about packed or supervised the packing, it's kind of silly indeed.
I think I contact the IFO in Brussels to pay them a visit, or perhaps they'll visit us ?

It's just 70 miles or so and I don't think they'll have the equipment at the IFO, since it's not in their normal line of work.

Allready got a name of an inspector working there.

Let's just see what possibilities we've got.

Thanks again for the bright explainations.

Even for this Dutch guy.

Ps. the only thing I'm afraid of is my English ;)

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