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LouDiamond

Canon 7D- 18MP/8fps/full HD Video/$1900

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24p, 25p, 30p, and 50i are all poor siource framerates for slomo by comparison to 60i and 60p.
Very difficult to create more interpolated frames where there were none to begin with, and call it "good."
Umderstanding apertures, zoom depth, etc will really help you with image quality more than a different lens will.
try shooting everything at f5.6 or f8. You'll have little to kno shallow DOF, but you'll minimize blur. Shutterspeed and aperture will determine blurs, framerates will determine smoothness.

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24p, 25p, 30p, and 50i are all poor siource framerates for slomo by comparison to 60i and 60p.
Very difficult to create more interpolated frames where there were none to begin with, and call it "good."
Umderstanding apertures, zoom depth, etc will really help you with image quality more than a different lens will.
try shooting everything at f5.6 or f8. You'll have little to kno shallow DOF, but you'll minimize blur. Shutterspeed and aperture will determine blurs, framerates will determine smoothness.



Hey DSE, do you know any articles online that you can recommend about this stuff? I'd like to learn how to shoot better video with my 550D.

Cheers,

Costyn.
Costyn van Dongen - http://www.flylikebrick.com/ - World Wide Wingsuit News

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Well..there are LOTS of websites regarding shutterspeed, DOF, and apertures for still photography, and for the most part, those same things apply to doing video with a still camera. If you can wait about a month, VASST have a training DVD on shooting video with a DSLR coming.
http://members.shaw.ca/ocl3/technical1.html has some great illustrations for showing the DOF.
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/fototech/htmls/depth.html has some good shutter speed/aperture information.
Easy thing to remember is the higher the value/number of the f-stop, the higher the depth of field. The lower the number, the lesser/shallower the DOF. A lens that is "fast" has a wide aperture potential. Anything larger than a 2.0 is considered "fast." Bear in mind that with *most* zoom lenses, your aperture decreases as you zoom in, which is why you see zoom lenses that say "f4-f5.6 on the barrel. The aperture size is determined by the depth of zoom applied.
HTH?

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Hi DSE,

Thanks, I thought video might have extra things to take into account that pertain especially to video. During the past years of owning a DSLR I have done my homework on photography and feel I have a good grasp of aperture, shutter speed, iso and the inherent relationship between them. And about 'fast' lenses and such.

Here's some delicious shallow DOF footage I made recently: http://vimeo.com/11024962 (warning, non skydiving footage! :P)

Cheers
Costyn van Dongen - http://www.flylikebrick.com/ - World Wide Wingsuit News

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other than the exposure, that's a really nice piece of footage.
Video has limit points, and highly compressed AVC footage makes superwhites appear to be blown out/clipped. The plastic hang tag in the video is white, but it's blown and bleeds, and when the sun hits the parrots belly, it blows it as well. In a photographic setting, you could probably get away with it. In video, the compression amplifies any exposure issues.
In other words, under expose a bit. If you're in the curve, underexposure can easily be dealt with in post. Over exposure of course...cannot be dealt with at all. The details are gone.
wish I had something that saturated in my trees.

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I've been eyeing the 7D for some time since it seems to give that 35mm movie quality look in 1080 mode.
However, there has been a significant number of reports from a general video community that it gets extremely hot after a short shoot, as little as 10 minutes.
Has anybody experienced this in a skydiving environment?
There is a huge jump from 7D to 4D Mark II, so..

4DBill

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it does get very hot. "Extremely" isn't the word I'd use. If one isn't familiar with file-based camcorders, it probably would be considered "extreme." Tne EX1/EX3 get equally hot...lots of memory buffering, lotsa heat being generated.

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it does get very hot. "Extremely" isn't the word I'd use. If one isn't familiar with file-based camcorders, it probably would be considered "extreme." Tne EX1/EX3 get equally hot...lots of memory buffering, lotsa heat being generated.



Just make sure the camera is properly aircooled :P shouldn't be a problem on your camera helmet right?

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it does get very hot. "Extremely" isn't the word I'd use. If one isn't familiar with file-based camcorders, it probably would be considered "extreme." Tne EX1/EX3 get equally hot...lots of memory buffering, lotsa heat being generated.



Is the shutter tripping for each frame, or is it electronically segmenting individual frames? I would think (if the former) that the shutter motor would get hot pretty fast...
Mike
I love you, Shannon and Jim.
POPS 9708 , SCR 14706

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Is the shutter tripping for each frame, or is it electronically segmenting individual frames? I would think (if the former) that the shutter motor would get hot pretty fast...



DSLR cameras don't have shutters.
"For you see, an airplane is an airplane. A landing area is a landing area. But a dropzone... a dropzone is the people."

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Is the shutter tripping for each frame, or is it electronically segmenting individual frames? I would think (if the former) that the shutter motor would get hot pretty fast...



DSLR cameras don't have shutters.



Wow - my 30D and my Rebel before it must be broken then, because both of them most certainly do.
Mike
I love you, Shannon and Jim.
POPS 9708 , SCR 14706

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DSLR cameras don't have shutters.



DSLR's do have shutters. They're not necessary, but are indeed part of the camera. Perhaps you are thinking of the leaf shutter, as opposed to the plane shutter? DSLR's don't have leaf shutters.

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DSLR cameras don't have shutters.



DSLR's do have shutters. They're not necessary, but are indeed part of the camera. Perhaps you are thinking of the leaf shutter, as opposed to the plane shutter? DSLR's don't have leaf shutters.



Okay, my apologies. I'll crawl back under my rock now.
"For you see, an airplane is an airplane. A landing area is a landing area. But a dropzone... a dropzone is the people."

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Please don't crawl back under a rock.
The light is better out here.

You'd be surprised at how many people confuse leaf vs plane shutters. I made the same assumption when DSLR first arrived.
Neither is needed, but the plane shutter does help keep dust off the imager, and of course, helps pre-compose the frame.

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DSLR cameras don't have shutters.



DSLR's do have shutters. They're not necessary, but are indeed part of the camera. Perhaps you are thinking of the leaf shutter, as opposed to the plane shutter? DSLR's don't have leaf shutters.



Okay, my apologies. I'll crawl back under my rock now.



Sorry, Bob - I should have thrown a couple smileys in my post, above.
Mike
I love you, Shannon and Jim.
POPS 9708 , SCR 14706

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Okay, my apologies. I'll crawl back under my rock now.



Sorry, Bob - I should have thrown a couple smileys in my post, above.



I did not take your post negatively at all. No need to apologize.

I am embarrassed that I spoke about something that I did not know about. I WAS referring to the leaf shutter DSE mentioned. I didn't know there was another item in there that could be described as a shutter.

Bob
"For you see, an airplane is an airplane. A landing area is a landing area. But a dropzone... a dropzone is the people."

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Okay, my apologies. I'll crawl back under my rock now.



Sorry, Bob - I should have thrown a couple smileys in my post, above.



I did not take your post negatively at all. No need to apologize.

I am embarrassed that I spoke about something that I did not know about. I WAS referring to the leaf shutter DSE mentioned. I didn't know there was another item in there that could be described as a shutter.

Bob



No worries, then - here's some interesting info on the subject of why DSLR's need a shutter, from a dpreview forum thread:

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The shutter in dSLRs do two things:

1. Time the exposure.

2. Exclude light from the sensor during non-capture times (which is MOST of the time).

The first one is the simpler of the two...let's start there. Yes, it would be easy to substitute an electronic shutter. However, most dSLR sensors don't have that capability at this time. And there are small issues with electronic shutters. There are many ways to do it. The cheap ways have problems. Google "rolling electronic shutter" and read. Most P&S cameras have a rolling shutter. Quality concious dSLR buyers will not like this method.

That leaves the more expensive "global" or "frame" shutter. It is more expensive because it requires an additional transistor at each photosite. That may sound trivial, but if a normal CMOS photosite has 2 transistors, that is a 50% increase in transistors. Even worse, it increases the non-photosensitive area at each photosite by about 50%. That negatively impacts light-gathering capability and this increases noise. Then there is the patent position. Companies like Kodak have a massive patent portfolio. Some of these patents cover various ways to implement "global" shutters! Perhaps Japan, Inc. is simply waiting until these patents expire?

The second reason re blocking light from the sensor is probably more germaine.

ALL cameras, even P&S types, have a "shutter" to block light from the sensor. This is required because if light is continuously shining on the sensor, all the data would have to be transferred SIMULTANEOUSLY. Most sensors transfer data serially. To keep the photosites from continuing to accumulate photons, cameras close the shutter during the period when data is being transfered. A sensor with a "global" electronic shutter helps, but all Silicon areas that are un-masked generate electrons when photons hit them. These "free" electrons can decrease the signal-to-noise ratio.



The shutter also helps protect the sensor from dust.

Evidently, there's a new type of camera, called an "EVIL" camera (Electronic Viewfinder, Interchangeable Lens) that combines the smaller size of the point-and-shoot cameras with most of the functionality of the DSLR.

Here's a quicky review of the Panasonic Lumix GF1, from Wired:

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Panasonic has joined Olympus in offering a mirror-less, viewfinder-less interchangeable-lens camera with the big Micro Four Thirds sensor. The 12.1 megapixel sensor in the Lumix GF1 is the same one found in Panasonic’s tiny “DSLR” style G1.

The main differences between this and the Olympus EP-1 Pen are the looks (plain, black or colored aluminum instead of fancy faux-leather), a pop-up flash (the Olympus has none), size (the Panasonic is “artistically flat”). Other standard features include image stabilization, face detection and HD video recording and ISO of up to 3200.



The camera uses existing Micro 4/3 lenses and has a focal-plane shutter.

DPReview.com review of the camera (Oct 2009), here. They describe it as a "G1 in a smaller package (without the viewfinder and articulated screen, obviously)"

Interesting stuff!
Mike
I love you, Shannon and Jim.
POPS 9708 , SCR 14706

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DSLR's do have shutters. They're not necessary, but are indeed part of the camera. Perhaps you are thinking of the leaf shutter, as opposed to the plane shutter? DSLR's don't have leaf shutters.



There are also DSLR´s with leaf shutters.

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On top of my hat at least the hasselblad lineup and Leica S2 uses leaf shutters.

They are both most definetly DSLR´s

The term SLR (single lens reflex camera) refers to the way the viewfinder is. SLR has a mirror that makes it possible to see the same composition from the viewfinder that you get when you press the shutter.

A rangefinder camera on the otherhand is not an SLR because it doesnt use this mirror mechanism..

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Yes, I know what "SLR" means. My angle earlier is that I don't consider medium and large format cameras in the context of the discussion we were having.
You're right, the Leica S2's (which I didn't know had a dual shutter system til your post) are in the same format category that we're discussing.
Thanks for the info! I learned something new this morning.

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