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mircan

Need advice on Cessna 182 exits with FTP

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Hi all.
I mostly jump on a C-182 DZ, use BH Flat Top Pro as my camera helmet (video+stills top mounted) and large wings on my jumpsuit.

Recently all TIs on my DZ changed their exit style in a way that they get out the door completely and are standing on a wheel step looking and launching in the tail direction. This position, as you can imagine, puts the passengers face way back toward the tail and away from the camera. Until now, my exit position was on the far end of the step, holding the strut, leaving slightly before tandem. Now, with passenger`s face this far back i can`t get a good exit (face) shot. I`m thinking of hanging from the strut and backflying the exit (tried on non-tandem exits), but i do not do if it will do much good because tandems launch in the tail direction.
The other camera guy uses wider angle lense on video and has sidemounted camera and still catches only just a little of the pax face.
Any advice on how to get better shots in this situation? (Except back floating the exit...)
dudeist skydiver #42

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Hi

These shots are from a tandem exiting a C205, but it's the same exit that works for a C182.

I use a FTP, HC5 with Century 0.5 Converter and 20D with Sigma 15mm all mounted side-by side on top.

Hanging from the strut and backflying is how I do it.

The tandem will fall straighter down than you, so leave with them, track up the hill to stay near them, then figure out how you like to transition back to belly to earth.

I do a slow somewhat inverted barrell roll to get belly to earth, which allows me to match the tandem's fallrate by slowing my roll and staying more headdown if they take longer to throw the drogue, before completing the roll to be flat again.

With some practice this exit allows you to stay in the TM's view the whole time as long as they stay on heading.

Note: picture no.5 had to be rotated 180 degrees as I am actually inverted at that point.

cya
sam

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Thanks for the exit pictures guys, but all tandems on those pictures exit sideways. I do not have a problem when they exit that way. Problem is that mine launch to the tail so they are turned away 90 degrees from me at best. So instead of "money shot" all i get from the passenger`s face is like in pis #2.

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Teach yourself to rear float the door.



I found earlier posts on c-182 rear float exits (including yours). You explained the way you hang, but not the way you get into the position. I would try the rear float, but I`m afraid not to fall off prematurely... [:/]
dudeist skydiver #42

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You explained the way you hang, but not the way you get into the position. I would try the rear float, but I`m afraid not to fall off prematurely...



Climb out on to the step, facing forward, both hands on the strut. Position your feet so they are side by side, and toawrd the rear of the step. Reach back with your left hand, and grab the rear or the door frame just below the mid-point. Lean back to the full extension of your right arm (right hand still on the strut) keeping your bady as close to the plane as possible.

This is the tricky part. Shift your weight from your right arm to your left, and release the strut with your right hand. You'll begin to 'fall' back a little, but use your left arm to slow this down. Aim your hip so it hits the fuselage just behind the door. As soon as you release your right hand, it should be moving quickly to the door frame, just below your left hand.

Now you've got the rear of the door frame with both hands, your hips are jusy behind and below the door, and your feet are still on rear edge of the step. From this position you can move your feet to a position where they won't interfere with the TM or students feet.

Pracitce the climbout on the ground while fully geared up. You can fall off the plane doing this. I have never fallen off, but others have,

Aside from that, just modify your exit from the strut. Position your left foot on the outside edge of the step, and place both hands on the strut. Lean back to full arms extension, and bend your left leg to get as low as you can.

When you exit, launch yourself straight back and you should be able to position yourself just behind and below the tandem.

Back flying won't help you with that type of tandem exit.

Also, any idea why the TM all started doing exits in this way? I've always thought the best way to exit a 182 was to put the student outside, feet on the step, facing 45 degrees between the tail and the wing. The TM stays mostly in the plane, and the rig stays completely in the plane. The pair then dives out from that position.

With what you descirbe, the tandem pair are fully outside, facing the tail. This puts the rig outside, and requires that is passes the door frame, and then is around the strut and door while outside of the plane. These are all areas where there could be interference with the rig, while if they keep the rig in the plane, the only problem is hitting the pilot as the TM turns around (the pilot will recover).

Also, it just seems like alot more work for the TM to get all the way out.

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Sh*t. I would never come up with this way of getting into rear float position [:/]
I will sure try it first on non-tandem jumps...

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Also, any idea why the TM all started doing exits in this way? I've always thought the best way to exit a 182 was to put the student outside, feet on the step, facing 45 degrees between the tail and the wing. The TM stays mostly in the plane, and the rig stays completely in the plane. The pair then dives out from that position.



They did that type of exit earlier but they say it is easier to launch this way - they just drop from the step. Both student legs are already on the step - no danger of legs between fuselage and the wheel.
The only plus for me is that on GO! now they really go.

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Also, it just seems like alot more work for the TM to get all the way out.


Tell me about it... we have to cut out some parts of exiting on some videos because it just takes forever. And the spot is...
dudeist skydiver #42

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I would never come up with this way of getting into rear float position
I will sure try it first on non-tandem jumps...



I haven't done it for a tandem, but I use that exit for AFF videos. I don't climb all the way out on the step first though. Right foot out, back out the door, and just work my way back until I've got both hands on the back of the door frame, right foot on the very back edge of the step, and left foot hanging. Never actually fell myself, but lost my footing and ended up hanging from the bottom corner of the door. Wasn't as hard to hold on as I expected.

Dave

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Rear float works great for Tandems and AFF exits. Be sure to keep your arms straight and not bend your left arm and put pressure on the window with your elbow. Pilots don't like it when you take out windows of the airplane. :-) I keep my hands low so I can video their climbout and expression throught the window. Once the tandem is in the door there is no prop blast and you can hear the screaming tandems really well.... even my girlfriend can do it and she used to have problems just holding on to the strut ....

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All great info. The rear door float is great if the TM leaves from the door postion.

I did work at an operation where doing tandems we would leave from the V. To shoot great video we would get into the door floater slot then work our way down the door and actually hang from the wheel strut looking straight up at the TM/passenger
As the TM would roll over there feet I would leave.
You cannot help but capture the passengers facial expression from this slot.

AAHH! life on Great Keppel Island was so much fun.;)

Cookie

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As per my previous post.

This camera slot off the wheel strut would be great for your TI's exit

It does not require to much effort to hang on, I did have a few intial buises under my arm from working my way down the door with my left arm until I got to the floor then a quick switch to the wheel strut.

Let me know if you need any more info. I may be able to find some old pic's of me hanging off the wheel strut.

C

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I don't climb all the way out on the step first though. Right foot out, back out the door, and just work my way back until I've got both hands on the back of the door frame, right foot on the very back edge of the step, and left foot hanging.



The reason that I climb out all the way first is that it get's you out of the plane facing the same direction that you'll be facing once you're in position. It eliminates the need to rotate in any way once you're outside the plane. You get out, and move straight back.

The other reason is that it lets you place both feet on the rear edge of the step before you start to transition to the rear float. There's no moving or rotating of your feet (or foot) as you move into position. This can help to keep you from losing your footing and find yourself hanging.

It a tough spot to get to for sure. I just like the idea of making as many seperate movements as possible. Climbout, place feet, slide back. When you try to mix them into one fluid motion, one mistaken placement will throw the whole thing off, and there's no real room for errors trying to get back there.

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