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grimmie

Help your DZ be efficient in the event of an accident

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I have been contacted by many of you regarding the EMS training I conduct at Skydive Perris. Thanks everyone and DVD's are on the way.

I started this course 16 years ago for the Eloy FD after a two fatality day. The local FD was pissed off beyond belief and wanted the DZ to be shut down. After meeting with them and conducting the training, the guys had a way better understanding of jumping.

The training is geared towards the local fire department, ambulance company and emergency helicopter crews. We train the closest 5 fire stations to the DZ, all 3 shifts.

The training includes a thorough skydiving gear section, how the gear works and things to be aware of in an emergency.

I have a "carnage" video to show the different types of mechanism of injury for different situations. Swoops gone bad, mid air freefall and canopy collisions, two out, canopy stalls etc.

We discuss local protocols, treatment and answer their MANY qustions.

Finally we put a jumper in a rig, simulate a scenario and remove them from the gear, WITHOUT CUTTING ANYTHING. I show them all the ways to remove gear without cutting, and ways to c-spine and backboard a jumper efficiently.

We go out to the hangar and show them the different aircraft, where the fuel is, where the exit doors and hatch handles are and discuss the different ways to access the DZ. They meet the guys that run the badspot vehicles and other DZ staff members. We cover helicopter landing areas and air ops in the event of a helicopter needed.

We have another question and answer period and then a written test. They receive continuing education credits for the course.

I know many DZ's have their own jumping doctors, nurses, EMT's, firemen and medics. I urge all of you to review your DZ safety plan. If you don't have one or need help, please let me know. I'll be glad to assist if I can in any way. And please, if you guys think of things to add, let me know.

The best thing a DZ can do is have a GREAT working relationship with the local FD and police departments and ambulance.

I'll be conducting this again, this time at Skydive Elsinore for their closest 5 stations soon. I'll keep you guys posted.

The other thing I urge ALL jumpers to do is take a basic first aid course. A few simple things learned could be the difference between life or death for someone.

Fly safe everyone.

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The other thing I urge ALL jumpers to do is take a basic first aid course.



Any you might recommend? I was looking at the american red cross for basic CPR and whatnot, but it would probably be good to focus on things like broken bones, etc.?

Where could/should I start looking if I wanted to get that kind of training (I have no medical background/certifications).

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The other thing I urge ALL jumpers to do is take a basic first aid course.



Any you might recommend? I was looking at the american red cross for basic CPR and whatnot, but it would probably be good to focus on things like broken bones, etc.?

Where could/should I start looking if I wanted to get that kind of training (I have no medical background/certifications).



Any course that gets into splints and traction's will be a long course, not a basic one.

As a basic first aider, you should learn the ABC's with CPR, treating shock, bleeding, and that's about it. The Red Cross is a good bet.

Now, if you want to get into a more in dept class go for it. I took, years ago, the Canadian Ski Patrol course. That was very in depth, but it was about 5 hours every week for a few months.
Remster

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I see you live in Seattle. Local jumpers Stuart Ono and Steve Platt (Splat) could point you in the right direction if you know them.
Ask at your DZ to find out who is in the EMS field. They can put you in touch with a reliable provider. There are many good first aid courses and some just OK. Once you have the basics it would be good to discuss trauma treatment for skydiver injuries with a local jumper in the field.

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Any course that gets into splints and traction's will be a long course, not a basic one.

As a basic first aider, you should learn the ABC's with CPR, treating shock, bleeding, and that's about it. The Red Cross is a good bet.

Now, if you want to get into a more in dept class go for it. I took, years ago, the Canadian Ski Patrol course. That was very in depth, but it was about 5 hours every week for a few months.



My agency switched from Red Cross certification to American Heart Association because AHA certifications are good for longer (since our training is mandatory for work this is purely a business decision).

Frankly the above advice is good, a basic first aid course will only help you very minimally for skydiver emergencies. I've taken the basic first aid and CPR courses since I was 12 (as a youth in the boy scouts, then worked in health care most of my adult life) and I usually stay away from the accidents at a drop zone since there are almost always quite a few people with much more advanced training there.
"What if there were no hypothetical questions?"

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Any course that gets into splints and traction's will be a long course, not a basic one.

As a basic first aider, you should learn the ABC's with CPR, treating shock, bleeding, and that's about it. The Red Cross is a good bet.

Now, if you want to get into a more in dept class go for it. I took, years ago, the Canadian Ski Patrol course. That was very in depth, but it was about 5 hours every week for a few months.



The research I've been doing seems to fall into that same split. Either you get a basic first aid course or you really gotta just jump into it and devote some time and money.

For a few years I've been kicking around the idea of getting a certification through the WMI (wilderness medical institute--part of NOLS). I'm in the mountains enough that it seemed like a good idea.

Either way I'm going to take a basic course to get started and then probably move into something more substantial. I appreciate the feedback. This kind of knowledge is important. I don't think I could live with myself if I was in a situation where I was the only one who could help and I didn't know what to do.

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Any basic training will teach you the knowledge to be effective in a DZ injury. You will know what to AND what NOT to do for someone.
After a basic course you can sit down with the trained folks at your DZ and do some skydiving related injury trauma training.

And knowing first aid comes in pretty handy your entire life, whever you are.B|

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If you want to really get an all inclussive course you can start to work on your EMT certification. Usually it includes a CPR cert with the course. It is a all inclussive long course with a national test at the end but well worth it.

A bit of a hassle to keep current as you are requirred to maintain the rating by attending courses during the year.

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As a new skydiver and avid skier (having competed in freesytle events in upper levels and coach x games athletes) I was curious how many dz have any type of emergency protocol similar to a ski areas ski patrol. I am on ski patrol on a local hill in Ohio and have my outdoor emergency certificate...very similar to a first responder certificate. With skydiving having a high impact (generally) as a mechanism of injury. It just seems as though DZ's should have at least a couple of staff members that are very aware of how to treat someone with these types of injuries...could mean the difference in life or death....just my 2 cents

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Training responders is an ordeal on the national level. Each state has their own rules and regulations as to what responders can and cannot do.

The big issue becomes, how would you train hundreds of "skydive patrol" members? Would USPA be responsible to train everyone? And who would monitor the continuing education? Who would give the training? And finally, the big problem, who would be liable if a trained person really screwed up?

Most DZ's have a fair amount of EMS qualified jumpers on hand at any given time. It now comes down to getting organized at their home DZ...

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I agree to a certain extent... it would be a process don't get me wrong...but we do have a national ski Patrol..and every state follows the exact same outline. And yes it would be be best under uspa...national and state trainers..some paid some volunteer..and the good Samaritan act covers almost everything...except complete negligence...was just a thought...hope all dz have a good plan is all

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Training responders is an ordeal on the national level. Each state has their own rules and regulations as to what responders can and cannot do.

The big issue becomes, how would you train hundreds of "skydive patrol" members? Would USPA be responsible to train everyone? And who would monitor the continuing education? Who would give the training? And finally, the big problem, who would be liable if a trained person really screwed up?

Most DZ's have a fair amount of EMS qualified jumpers on hand at any given time. It now comes down to getting organized at their home DZ...



The red cross has good emergency response classes, as well as specific advanced first aid/cpr and wilderness first aid (for situations where access to a doctor may not be fast. If your DZ is remote, this may be a good idea.).

As for the liability, that depends on the laws of the individual state. This may be of help: Good Samaritan Law

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