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freefalle

Question on using Maunal settings for stills

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Im looking for the opinions of others. When shooting stills weather it be 35mm or Digital, is there any advantage to using the manual setting and chosing both the shutter speed and Aperture setting? If so what are the advantages, as opposed to using the shutter speed priority and letting the camera choose the aperture?

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I use TV (time value) or otherwise known as shutter speed. I set it for 1/500 sec and let the camera work out the aperture. If I am shooting film and it is getting close to sun set I will back of the shutter speed to 350. If i am shooting digital I will bump the asa up to 200 or 400.

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I have been using the Tv mode on the camera for a long time, and occasionally the camera chooses an aperture that I would not agree with, so lately I started shooting more in manual mode.

What this buys you is consistent exposures, and you are in full control of the exposure.
I use manual focus, so I rely on the depth of field (determined by the aperture) a lot, when the camera chooses a really high aperture all of a sudden (goes from F8 to F4 or something) the depth of field of my picture is heavily impacted.. That's why I started doing Manual mode more..

It's all a preference, like I said.. Tv has worked great for me as well.. there was just the occasional shot that I didnt like...

Iwan

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Depends upon what you are trying to achieve. If you're close enough and would like to blur the background and emphasize the subject you can choose a large aperture which will give you a short depth of field, or if you would like, you can choose a small aperture which will bring the background in to focus which gives a nice depth and clarity to the picture.

In skydiviing though, you have to take in to account the speed and motion of your subject. The clothes on your subject in freefall will flap and move causing motion blur in the picture unless you use a higher shutter speed.

Manual settings give you more freedom when you're trying to accomplish something very specific and they're a lot of fun to experiment with. But, if you're trying to shoot a whole roll of good pictures on one skydive, they're not as useful.

If you use Shutter Priority, the camera doesn't just "choose" the aperture - it calculates which aperture it needs for correct exposure. The same goes for Aperture Priority - the camera calculates the shutter speed needed for correct exposure.

As a general rule - Shutter Priority is more useful in skydiving since you want to eliminate blur caused by flapping clothes (and cheeks, chins, bellies, etc;)).

Personally, I use Shutter Priority for the most part but, when I want to play around and try for something a bit more unusual, such as the attached double exposure, I'll use the manual settings.

Play around with ALL of the settings - it's really good practice and it's a lot of fun.

Peace,
Z






Action©Sports

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