0
freebird

cut-aways with RSL

Recommended Posts

This isn't what you asked but I have to point it out... With or without an RSL my emergency procedure is the same - pull cutaway, pull reserve. Never, ever, ever rely on an RSL to deploy your reserve for you!!
pull and flare,
lisa
--
What would Scooby Doo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A student I knew once cutaway on a rig with a RSL. The rig came down with the reserve handle still in the pocket, but not because he didn't go for it but because his reserve was already deploying before he reached the silver handle.
I remember that because my very first instructor would've made me go back outside the hanger, put the rig on and pull the reserve handle anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In my case I couldn't find the reserve handle after I cut away. I could definetely tell I was back in freefall, I'm sure it must of only been for a couple of seconds, but it felt like forever since I couldn't find the handle anywhere. Anyway, the reserve opened so softly that I didn't even notice that I was under canopy untill I looked up. Needless to say I was extremely happy that I had an RSL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I couldn't find the reserve handle after I cut away


This is exactly the reason why I put one hand on each handle. If my main is going bye-bye I'm sure as heck making sure I pull the silver (I don't jump an RSL, but that dead horse has been beaten enough).
If I have a hard cutaway for whatever reason, I'll let go of the silver handle, but only in that situation. Otherwise, one on each. Can't lose it if it's in your hand.
"Zero Tolerance: the politically correct term for zero thought, zero common sense."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was doing AFFlevel 5. After I cut away I wasn't belly to earth, more like standing up.
You know when at ground school they tell you look at the silver as you're cutting away, well I didn't do that, & that's why I couldn't find the silver. The student rig was huge, so the harness shifted, and the handle got flipped under the harness. But I lived.
Anyway from now on in case of a cutaway I'll put one hand on each handle. I'll just have to wait a bit to make ssure the reserve won't fire into the main. (But I'm kind of hoping I won't have to do that anytime soon).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The year was 1993.
The dropzone was California City.
The airplane was a Twin Otter.
The main canopy was a Strong 520.
The student was big.
The videographer was Emiko.
At pull time, I felt opening shock and looked up to see two holes through my canopy.
You could have driven a bus through either hole!
I grabbed red.
I grabbed silver.
I peeled red.
I peeled silver.
I arched again.
I pulled red.
I pulled silver.
I started to fall face to earth.
It seemed to take forever, but in reality, I felt a soft opening shock after falling about twice the length of the reserve suspension lines.
Afterwards, Emiko teased me about not doing a control check before cutting away.
I did that a dozen more times at Hemet, California.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It was Hinckley, in the fall.
It was a packing error.
I packed it. Doh!
It was a twin otter,
It was a 22 way. (moral of the story, someone always has a cuttaway on big ways.)
I dumped, I looked up.
I had a complete line over. My right steering line came down, did a complete 360 around all the lines, then anchored at the slink.
I was spinning, fast. I could counter the spin by hauling DEEP riser on the other side. It wasn't worth it.
Right hand blue
Left hand silver.
Arch.
Pull blue
Pull silver
look up, see white.
It was that quick. I didn't go belly-to earth. I didn't feel falling. No stomach in throat like I expected. The canopy was instant. There was no tension when I pulled silver.
When I landed I was laughing. Damn that was fun, I wanna go again!
True moral of the story is don't be lazy when you pack. I saw the problem as I was putting the line stows on. I thought I fixed it. I should've opened up the canopy, checked the lines, repack. I didn't.
_Am

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was on a 8 way at Lake Wales. I drove three hours to get there and it was the first jump. Because it was RW jump I disconnected my RSL and got on the Casa. At the two minute call I checked my handles and noticed my cutaway handle was tucked behind the rig. I fixed it and had an awesome 8 way. Tracked away, looked around, deployed and the lines were twisted and the slider was all the way up the lines. I tried to kick and twist my way out with no luck. I got to the hard deck and grabbed my cutaway, grabbed my reserve handle and chink chink. I fell feet to earth and next thing I know I have my red PD Reserve above my head and I am watching the freebag and canopy fall to earth.
RSL...my opinion you do not need it if you do the emergency procedures. Practice when you gear up, and at door call. You will do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I disconnect on big ways (not saying an eight way is a really big way) because I am usually jumping with newbies and I have seen entanglements. If I cut and have to pull out the knife and chop I want to allow ample time to get everything away before I pull the reserve.
I might be wrong but it makes sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I disconnect on big ways (not saying an eight way is a really big way) because I am usually jumping with newbies and I have seen entanglements.

What big ways, greater than 8 by your own admission, are you jumping on where 'newbies' are invited?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have 100+ jumps and I will always jump with someone new. How else will they learn? I am a newbie myself and my personal preference is to not use the RSL. That's all. I am from a small dz and just moved to Orlando where I have several dz's in the area. I am looking forward to attending Skydive University, Sky Venture etc. My own 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A newbie like me appreciates people like you, but I don't think I would feel safe at my level jumping with that many people. What level jumpers are we talkin here. Just wondering when I should attempt anything more than a 4-way..(sorry, a bit off topic)
The mind is like a parachute--it works better when it is open. JUMP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sky,
youre wondering when you should begin doing bigger jumps? like every other aspect, it depends on you. Ive got friends w/ 100 jumps doing 7 way freefly jumps. I've got close to 70 and get really iffy doing a 3 way freefly. never did more than a 4 way belly dive (ignoring the tandem :) Why? cause i dont feel comfortable with the idea. The skydive itself doesnt scare me, its breakoff. I've really been thinking hard lately. i'd like to do more 4ways and then maybe a 6way. but the people on those jumps will be people I picked out. cause in the end, im the newbie, the one with the least experience. I'm looking out for me.
do jumps with more people when youre completely comfortable with it.. dont rush it. cause you dont want to be up there freaking out, wishing you were down here, or up there with less people.
My little corner of the web.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
***
I disconnect on big ways (not saying an eight way is a really big way) because I am usually jumping with newbies and I have seen entanglements. If I cut and have to pull out the knife and chop I want to allow ample time to get everything away before I pull the reserve.
***
Entanglements are avoided by learning to track, and teaching others to track.
Also by flying your canopy heads up and teaching others to do the same.
Big way RW is not an occasion where it is recommended to disconnect the RSL, especially at your experience level.
Put it this way - if you are anticipating a canopy collision or wrap and you aren't doing CRW, then something is very very wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You know, you'd think I'd get that most of jumping has to do with doing what you think and when it is best and most safe (with having good training), I guess I am just used to student status where the decisions are made for me. Now, I can do what I want (not that I will do anything stupid), it is really exciting, but sometimes I doubt myself. I really have to knock that off.
The mind is like a parachute--it works better when it is open. JUMP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have to call a major hypocrysie (sp.. sorry i'm french) syndrome happening here!
First: skyrose, this isnt directed at you! You are right o take thing at your own pace. Some do 10 to 15 ways RW jups at 75 jumps (we didnt turn that many points, thx to me!), some stay in small groups for quite a while. The people who have told you to take things at your pace are quite right (well, let just say that I agree with them instead...). If you want to start getting more aggressive in your progression, you can.. in the end, whatever anyone choice is, its your choice.
HOWEVER, this attitude is 100% the opposite to what was going on with Rhino is his Xaos thread in gear and rigging. He's taking things at his pace, which might be scary for some (me included), but he seams to be educated about it, and I must say, he kept his cool in the discussion, much better then others might. Sorry for the highjack folks, I just had to vent....
Remster
Muff 914

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
>You know, you'd think I'd get that most of jumping has to do with doing what you think and when it is best and most safe
>(with having good training), I guess I am just used to student status where the decisions are made for me.
> Now, I can do what I want (not that I will do anything stupid), it is really exciting, but sometimes I doubt myself.
The biggest mistakes I've made in skydiving have generally come from not trusting my instincts, rather than not having the judgement to avoid something or do something. Trust your feelings.
-bill von

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
>This is exactly the reason why I put one hand on each handle.
I learned on an SOS. When I got my own rig I decided to use the one-hand-per-handle. My second mal was a spinner, and I put both hands on my handles and tried to pull the cutaway. It didn't move. I moved my other hand over to help and pulled it. I then found myself back in freefall. I reached for my reserve, found a metal handle, and pulled it. It didn't move either. Fortunately I looked down and noticed I was grabbing the large 3-ring (the harness had shifted.) It took a second to find and pull the reserve handle. It seemed to take forever, although I'm pretty sure the whole process took under 3 seconds.
Both methods can work (two hands per handle and one hand per handle) but if you do plan on using one hand per handle, it's also a good idea to practice finding your reserve handle.
-bill von

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
>A newbie like me appreciates people like you, but I don't think I would feel safe at my level jumping with that many
>people. What level jumpers are we talkin here. Just wondering when I should attempt anything more than a 4-way..(
It has way more to do with the jumpers than with the size of the formation. When I had about 50 jumps, and was a brand new Perris jumper, I did an 11 way and we turned 6 points. I didn't know any of the people on the dive, but someone there who was an organizer (and who seemed competent) assured me that he had gotten some good people together. When we turned so many points I figured it must be me, I had suddenly gotten better.
Years later, when I read my logbook, I recognized some of the names - Tony Domenico, Kate Cooper, John Eagle, John Hamilton, Linda Hardesty. The level of the people on that dive was sufficient to handle one bumbling fool (me) with no problems.
I've done this at tent 1 on occasion. We'll take someone with 30 jumps and plan an 8-way with him, four AFF-JM's and three other organizers. It doesn't necessarily teach them all the skills they need to do an 8-way, but I remember how excited I was on the 11-way, and it's nice to be able to do that for someone else. It can be done safely under those conditions, but I always let them know that this does _not_ mean they're ready for an 8 way with seven other jumpers of their experience level.
-bill von

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

0