0
diablopilot

The consequences.

Recommended Posts

Quote

Quote

How far as an instructor do you go to make sure your graduates understand the consequences of skydiving?

In this day of people believing there is a safety net for everything, what do you feel is your responsibility to impart.

Do you believe that there is a requirement to make sure that your students understand that their actions or in-actions could cause their death, or serious injury? Or even the fact that sometimes thing just plain go wrong?

I know it's part of the waiver, but do you feel it's part of what should be understood before you stamp that A license card?

What say you? And if you so desire, share some of the techniques you use to get the point home.



All through my static line progression I was encouraged to read all the incident reports in the stack of Parachutist sitting next to the couch at the DZ and to ask questions about them if I did not understand.

This got the point home for me and taught me about all the crap that can go wrong, how to properly handle these situations, what not to do during a skydive and the consequences




Yup...and at a few DZ's that I visited back before it was a 'sport', the boots hanging up around the clubhouse weren't for student use.

Constant reminder, no do-overs! ;)










~ If you choke a Smurf, what color does it turn? ~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diab,
Long story short, level 7 student right in front of me deployed into a bag lock. I fell with him until my hard deck. watched him in freefall until eventually a reserve appeared. He did beat the AAD but not by much.
The thing that just amazed me was, he had no clue how close he just came. It was no big deal to him and he even laughed at it. I tried and tried to explain but I wasnt getting through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I've seen at least dozen AAD fires, most of of which were low time (sub 100, less than a year in sport) jumpers. The unfortunate reaction from several of them that it was no big deal, the just made a small mistake and the reality of how close to death they were just doesn't seem to be there. How would you handle that?



The late great and eloquently profane Al Frisby once said that every (bleeping) Cypres fire should be treated as a (bleeping) fatality -- and that the "firee" should be grounded until the investigation was complete and proper measures taken to make sure the "firee" does in fact "get it" that if the Cypres "saves" you, you were in fact an eyeblink from assuming room temperature.

This is a far better tack to take than the current custom of congratulating people for losing track of time and altitude and, as one poster said, "treating it as no big deal."

B|
SCR-6933 / SCS-3463 / D-5533 / BASE 44 / CCS-37 / 82d Airborne (Ret.)

"The beginning of wisdom is to first call things by their right names."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I've seen at least dozen AAD fires, most of of which were low time (sub 100, less than a year in sport) jumpers. The unfortunate reaction from several of them that it was no big deal, the just made a small mistake and the reality of how close to death they were just doesn't seem to be there. How would you handle that?



if my AAD ever fires with me not incapacitated in some way then I will quit! Bottom line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

0