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13 minutes ago, Coopericane said:

I heard a rumor about a new suspect in the Expedition Unknown episode. I'm going to watch it soon but is there any truth to that?

At the very end they flash a new suspect... no name just a sketch.

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Got up early this morning to move the last load to Yakima and shift AB of Seattle to eastern WA. But when I arrive, the plan is for me to back the Beverly Hillbillies Laden truck into the garage leave it there until Sunday. 

On Friday afternoon, after I arrive, you can imagine what will happen then. Oh, yes. Details not necessary. :thumbup:

On Saturday, Susan and I go to the Hops Festival in Moxee and hang out and dance. Then Friday afternoon gets a rerun. 

After that, we both start living the life we wanted to all along. Long story. I won't bore you with it. 

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This Reca nonsense has to end..

Somebody named Carl called in to the Steven Rinehart show 2008 during an interview with Larry Carr. Carl’s voice sounds exactly like Carl Laurin. The interview was in 2008 and Carl claims he taped his conversation with Walter Reca in 2008/2009. The tapes with Reca clearly show leading questions. Carl Lauren researched the case and fed info to Reca for the tape recordings. Reca sounds like he has early Alzheimer's in those tapes. Unfortunately, Carl’s research was poor. and he got some things wrong. The Reca narrative relies on him knowing info only the hijacker would know, that is not the case. All the info was available and Carl was researching it as evidenced by his questions to Larry Carr..


Carl at 10:39
 



Carl on our Salt Lake County line...

Aug 2008  -  interview of Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) field agent Larry Carr by Steve Rinehart of K-TALK, 630 AM Salt Lake City, discussing the FBI's ongoing investigation of the NORJAK hijacking by Dan Cooper,


Carl’s voice..

@ 25:22

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErCM9LSFrl0


SR: We have some callers. I want to continue asking you questions of my own, but let’s try to fit a couple of them in here, as we go.

LC: Sure.
SR: We got Carl on the Salt Lake county line. Carl, you’re on the air with Agent Carr.

Carl: Yeah, hi. The FBI put on the newspapers the composite drawings. Now, are these pretty accurate in terms of the people who actually came in contact with the hijacker?

LC: Yeah, you know everyone that came in contact with that gentleman in the interview with a sketch artist. They went about their process, developing all of the parameters of the individual’s face. They went back and constructed these sketches and then they were sent back out to the field. Each person looked them over. The three stewardesses involved

looked them over, and there were some changes made to the original one. Once the stewardesses gave the thumbs up that this is the best representation, and that’s what was put out to the public.

Carl: Okay, and then these thousands of suspects you developed, did they fit the basic description then?

LC: Well, you know, a lot of them were ruled out basically on the physical descriptors of who D.B. Cooper was. Not necessarily the sketch, but basically the physical parameters; the dark complexion, or the olive skin complexion. Well, if your suspect’s fair skinned, and even if they weren’t solely ruled out on that, that’s one tick. Yeah okay, I guess if this person, if they were 5’7, as opposed to what was reported as 5’10 to 6’1, there’s another tick, that hey maybe this isn’t the right person. If they had blue eyes... Well, we’re pretty sure D.B. Cooper had brown eyes. So, you know, rule that off. Yeah, you know, a lot of the suspects were ruled because they didn’t fit the physical criteria.

Carl: Yeah, I mean, since the FBI, they have this belief that the man may’ve been killed in the jump or when he hit the ground. Did the FBI conduct a search among the missing person reports?

LC: Well you look at the databases back then, you know, long before the time of the computer, it was easier to connect the dots as far as missing persons go. So there was, of course, an effort at the missing persons database, but it just simply didn’t really exist back in that point of time. You know, it would’ve individual sheriff departments that would’ve collected

the data, and someone had to do that. I couldn’t even guess how many sheriff’s departments there are in the United States, but I would imagine is was well into the thousands.

Carl: Yeah, you know, is it possible when the hijacker got on the plane he would’ve changed his appearance? Like wearing a wig or maybe wearing these thick soled shoes so, you know, it’d make it appear that he might be taller, or maybe colored his hair a different color. Is that at all possible?

LC: All that is possible, but when you look at how much time, especially Tina Mucklow, spent, the hijacker, shoulder-to-shoulder with him... You know, you can try these experiments yourself. Go ahead and put some makeup on your skin, if you’re fair skinned, and put enough on to swarthy, and then have someone sit next to you. You’re going to see that makeup, it’s going to be pancaked on to you. Same thing with a wig, it looked very unnatural, especially during 1971. So if someone’s wearing a wig, it’s going to be very noticeable.

Carl: What seat was he sitting in before he, you know, hijacked the plane?

LC: He was sitting in the very back, and I don’t have the file in front of me so...

Carl: Was he sitting next to somebody else with whom he had a conversation?

LC: No, he was sitting all by himself in a row of three. And, you know, ultimately, Flow Chapner sat by him originally, and Tina Mucklow the rest of the flight.

Carl: What type of firearm did he have? LC: No firearm.
SR: And a grenade.

LC: No grenade. He had opened up his briefcase and there was either dynamite or road flares in there.

Carl: Yeah, well interesting case. I wish you good luck Agent Carr.

SR: Carl, thanks for the call. We appreciate it.

Carl: Yeah, thank you. Goodbye.

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16 hours ago, FLYJACK said:

Watched the new Expedition Unknown,,, Tom Kaye was good and the guys at the beginning discussing suspects was good, should have had Hahneman in the suspects but nobody (but me) really has enough info on him.

The Walter Reca stuff was nonsense.

The Eric Ulis stuff was ridiculous. 

Maybe the briefcase parts find was staged.. Josh has been known to do things like that..

 

But, Ulis claim is wrong.. it is 100% false that the Columbia River reached the money spot only in ’72 and ’74…

The money spot was about the 5 to 7 foot level which was easily reached without the River at flood stage. The ’72 and ’74 flood levels were about 21 feet..

So, in June '72 the money spot was 12-15 feet underwater..  when Ulis claims Cooper was digging it up.

The briefcase find is a joke, the money spot has lost maybe 10 feet of material depth to erosion.. the money spot plus 10 ft deep of material is long gone.

I assume it was a plant for dramatic effect.

 

The hinge and clasp look like they are from a guitar case, not a briefcase.

Musicians I know get their guitars stolen often... it is a big problem.

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(edited)

Reca nonsense? I am just about to pull the plug on this computer system and stick it behind the cab of my truck. 

I had Reca and Laurin pegged to a T...two years ago:

https://thedbcooperhijacking.wordpress.com/2019/09/03/suspects-101-ten-good-reasons-why-walter-reca-isnt-d-b-cooper-but-youll-only-need-one/

Have a great day, guys. I am exit stage left after fourteen years in this town. See you on the back side when I get to my new place this afternoon. B)

I will tell you something. It's one thing to be possibly wrong on a suspect, such as is the case with Kenny Christiansen. Maybe he was Cooper, maybe he wasn't. 

It is quite another to just sit there and lie to the public and the media in order to force your suspect into that round hole with a square peg. BIG difference. 

In one instance, you are simply wrong. In the other, you're just a damn liar. 

It seems like poetic justice that I will be going right past Cle Elum on my way to Yakima today. I will shake my head and laugh at people like Carl Laurin, who throw a monkey wrench into other folks' genuine work on the case...by just making shit up as you go along. Even the KGB ID document he presented was easily spotted as a poor forgery and a fake...which happens to describe Laurin himself quite well. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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(edited)

Ulis is claiming the buckle and hinge were a legitimate find,,, that makes it worse than a plant..

Do they not realize that about 10 feet DEEP of material is completely eroded from that area..

The money spot isn't actually 15 feet into the River on the bottom, the River didn't rise the bar has been completely obliterated.

and does anyone actually believe that Cooper jumped and landed with the briefcase...

Edited by FLYJACK

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(edited)

There was never any means to a prosecution.. the FBI knew they didn't have enough evidence without a cooperating suspect.

 

In 1976 the FBI held their own CooperCon and concluded that a prosecution was extremely difficult if Cooper was uncooperative. Eyewitnesses were weak and limited physical evidence.

witnessesweak1.jpeg.8d41d93fd69c12e4cfc0e33e9645cc46.jpeg

coopercaseweak.jpeg.0222aba95720c68df86f8eb9adf4afc4.jpeg

 

All latents lifted form the hijacked aircraft of no value... 

"this case considered closed"? 1987

printsnovalue.jpeg.130f04acfee3031005d2619dd45de0d4.jpeg

 

 

Edited by FLYJACK

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2 hours ago, FLYJACK said:

Ulis is claiming the buckle and hinge were a legitimate find,,, that makes it worse than a plant..

Do they not realize that about 10 feet DEEP of material is completely eroded from that area..

The money spot isn't actually 15 feet into the River on the bottom, the River didn't rise the bar has been completely obliterated.

and does anyone actually believe that Cooper jumped and landed with the briefcase...

Not to assume the recent discovery is legitimate, but If I were Cooper I would have tossed the briefcase out individually before jumping (especially if it was a fake bomb). Maybe some money came loose from the force of his throw and made its way down to the ground in the same area?

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12 hours ago, Coopericane said:

Not to assume the recent discovery is legitimate, but If I were Cooper I would have tossed the briefcase out individually before jumping (especially if it was a fake bomb). Maybe some money came loose from the force of his throw and made its way down to the ground in the same area?

I have never heard anybody claim or even entertain the idea that Cooper jumped and landed with the briefcase...

He can't hold it, he would have to somehow tie it to himself and that doesn't make sense. 

Regardless, the buckle and hinge do not match an attache/briefcase and the about 10 feet thick of material has eroded since NORJAK..  

 

 

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Here is Bruce Smith's photo of the card found in the chute returned to Hayden.

https://themountainnewswa.net/2011/10/25/db-cooper-case-heats-up-again-with-controversy-over-parachutes/

dbc-parachutes-hayden-card-pararchute-identification-4.thumb.jpg.70f1f3e4f4311299437186f1a446e218.jpg

 

The FBI couldn't read the card correctly.. 

The descriptor is below not above.

MAKE: Pioneer

TYPE: 26' Ripstop Conical

SERIAL NO: 226

DATE OF MFR: Sept 1957

 

Here, they get the descriptors wrong, TYPE, SN and DATE. 

They also get the descriptors for other card (60-9707) found in the chute wrong.

chutereno2.jpg.52e335db4b2950c8d80a21b07398c080.jpg

 

Those are two different packing cards both packed by Cossey same date May 21, 1971.

60-9707 found in the chute..

chutecardpocket.jpeg.8dce6ccda40837849553ed55be7cbfa9.jpeg

chuteinpestion2a.jpg.9d2b8a964e38b5ce3ce1af657d37c54f.jpg

 

Here the FBI never got Cossey's records.. Did he not have them or did he realize he gave them the wrong description?

Cosseyrecords1.jpeg.c646996f539513efc8d491f47c628ad4.jpeg

Cosseychuterecords.jpeg.b34583f442c0fcc9fbe57cb674d5e45c.jpeg

 

FBI claims they can't eliminate a chute based on the serial number, but they did have the two packing cards.

chutenosernumber.jpeg.b31bfb02b78159aa13afacd92272dbd3.jpeg

 

We have two back chute packing cards, packed the same date by Cossey both from the plane.. Tosaw's book claims that Cooper removed the packing cards and that claim supports the two cards being found.

So, the FBI had the packing card and SN for the chute Cooper took and It does not match Cossey's NB6 claim. Cossey's claim was the only evidence for Cooper using his NB6.

 

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41 minutes ago, Coopericane said:

A big takeaway for me from the show was that Tom Kaye's research showed that the diatoms did not penetrate through the sand. Like on the show I am still struggling to come up with a scenario for what happened to the money, nothing fits all the pieces...

Yes, but Tom Kaye said money was dry until Spring 1972.... not exactly.

Actually, it is at least Spring 1972, but the money could have entered the Columbia R in any Spring from '72 thru '79... 

The Diatom's indicate that the money entered the Columbia R first in a Spring from 72-79 and became embedded in the sand within a relatively short time.

I have 3 theories that fit this scenario.

Also, the money didn't float it sank within minutes so it is not likely it washed up to the surface of the River and got deposited on TBAR..  The money spot was at about the 5-7 foot water level and the River frequently went well above that with the seasonal high water in Spring.

You do not need the 72 and 74 record flood events to put the money spot under water.

It is most likely the money went into the River in a Spring (72-79) when the River was above the money spot and the money tumbled along the bottom to its spot (which was effectively the River bottom) where it became buried. 

Of course, where was the money between NORJAK and its Spring entry into the River. 

 

 

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(edited)

I don't think I will ever believe that the Tina Bar money went into the river on its own and somehow floated, tumbled, what have you to the spot it was found. I think someone tossed some of it into the river sometime after November 24, 1976...when the FBI wangled themselves that John Doe warrant against Cooper. 

No one seems to ask themselves the Big Question: If Cooper did not land in the Columbia River, (and the evidence heavily suggests he did NOT) then what would motivate him later to dump a bit of the cash into the Columbia? Might be the fact that the local media was building up the idea for months before November 24, 1976 that Cooper might be free and clear after that date. There was much speculation about it. FBI officials had a meeting about it down in San Francisco the April of that year. Except for the meeting in San Francisco, this stuff was all over the papers and the TV news. I imagine Cooper, unless he were dumber than a box of hammers, probably saw all that stuff, too. So when the Big News came to TV and the papers that Cooper was NOT going to be 'free and clear' on November 24, 1976 after all...maybe he decided in a bit of desperation to do something about it. To try and throw the FBI off his tail. And I have always said that if this was his plan, it actually worked to a degree. After the Tina Bar money find, the FBI's official position shifted. They began saying they thought Cooper died in the jump. And just like what happens when a search and rescue becomes instead a body recovery effort for one reason or another...they cut back the manpower, the budget, and their efforts to find him. At least until 2008, anyway.

Sometimes I think armchair investigators overthink certain points in the case, when the truth is probably a lot simpler. As far as Eric Ulis and his current narrative on the case, you have to remember that he is investing both his, and most likely a few sponsors' money in an attempt to pack the house down at the Kiggins Theater in November. And in order to accomplish that, he also has to (by any means necessary) present himself to both the public and the sponsors that he is the supreme expert on the Cooper case. 

That title does not belong to him, of course. In my opinion, that title belongs to Geoff Gray, since he's the guy who first got access to the UN-redacted files and released them publicly, wrote the biggest-selling book about the case (a book that made the New York Times bestseller list for a time), and obtained testimony from many of the key figures in the case, some of whom are no longer among the living. 

Ulis is trying to show himself as THE guy on the case, but the problem is that he doesn't have any research out there beyond a few videos, (no book or paper on the case at all) and is more of a P.T. Barnum than anything else. The reason the upcoming convention has no headliners that would actually fill the seats is because Ulis wants to BE the headliner. The problem is that he hasn't done his roadwork or his research. Everything he presents comes straight from his mouth either in a post or on a video at YouTube, or occasionally on some silly TV show, and quite a bit of it is baloney. 

This is probably enough to attract a few curiosity seekers in November, and the usual folks who will attend any of these conventions. But that is about it. I also have my sources, just like everyone else involved in this case...although my involvement of late has been a lot less. And my sources say he isn't selling that many tickets to this event. My assessment on why is because the entire picture of what I call 'Cooperland,' which is a combination of the hard core fans and armchair investigators of the case...is fractured and in disarray. There is nothing united about it. In reality, many of the most well-known names in the Cooper case aren't even participating. There isn't even a Planning Committee, which for something like this is an absolute necessity.

There is only Eric. And a few sponsors who will set up tables at the theater hawking their wares, or their businesses, and hoping for the best. They should not expect miracles. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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39 minutes ago, RobertMBlevins said:

No one seems to ask themselves the Big Question: If Cooper did not land in the Columbia River, (and the evidence heavily suggests he did NOT) then what would motivate him later to dump a bit of the cash into the Columbia? Might be the fact that the local media was building up the idea for months before November 24, 1976 that Cooper might be free and clear after that date.

https://cdnc.ucr.edu/?a=d&d=DS19761125.2.20&e=-------en--20--1--txt-txIN--------1

According to this article, because Cooper was a fugitive, the statute of limitations would not apply to him. The John Doe warrant was more of a "just in case" move. Something else interesting from the article was the pair of trousers that were found 25 foot high in a tree. According to the article, the FBI believed the trousers belonged to the skyjacker. Although later in the article it says the FBI believed that he drowned in Lake Merwin. I had never heard of these trousers being found before. They were described as checkered blue-gray. I don't recall any descriptions of Cooper wearing such pants, so I don't know why the FBI thought they could be his?

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(edited)
1 hour ago, ParrotheadVol said:

https://cdnc.ucr.edu/?a=d&d=DS19761125.2.20&e=-------en--20--1--txt-txIN--------1

According to this article, because Cooper was a fugitive, the statute of limitations would not apply to him. The John Doe warrant was more of a "just in case" move. Something else interesting from the article was the pair of trousers that were found 25 foot high in a tree. According to the article, the FBI believed the trousers belonged to the skyjacker. Although later in the article it says the FBI believed that he drowned in Lake Merwin. I had never heard of these trousers being found before. They were described as checkered blue-gray. I don't recall any descriptions of Cooper wearing such pants, so I don't know why the FBI thought they could be his?

A person tossing a bundle of money into the River is a possibility but not with an expectation that it was going to be found. If it was tossed it was to get rid of it.

There was no statute of limitations for a capital crime.. per Cooper FBI investigators.

capitalcrime.jpeg.177e797f212d730c418042992199b122.jpeg

 

The trousers are mentioned in the FBI files and after investigating it was dismissed. 42" waist, too big.

 

rawimage-1515088315664240279.jpg.832ecb97385ab916dfd88d07ed45a58a.jpg

 

 

Edited by FLYJACK

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If there was no Statute of Limitations on Cooper....

Then WHY did the FBI obtain a John Doe warrant at the very last minute...

Before the Statute of Limitations....which was discussed by the FBI prior to April 1976...expired. 

At the time of Cooper, the Statute of Limitations on air piracy was five years. It applies if they don't know the identity of the person they are looking for. If they DO know the person's identity, they can get a warrant, there is no statute, and they can keep renewing that warrant forever. Some time after Cooper, the US Congress passed a law making air piracy a capital offense. AFTER Cooper. 

That doc you quoted is from 2001.

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(edited)
23 minutes ago, RobertMBlevins said:

If there was no Statute of Limitations on Cooper....

Then WHY did the FBI obtain a John Doe warrant at the very last minute...

Before the Statute of Limitations....which was discussed by the FBI prior to April 1976...expired. 

At the time of Cooper, the Statute of Limitations on air piracy was five years. It applies if they don't know the identity of the person they are looking for. If they DO know the person's identity, they can get a warrant, there is no statute, and they can keep renewing that warrant forever. Some time after Cooper, the US Congress passed a law making air piracy a capital offense. AFTER Cooper. 

That doc you quoted is from 2001.

Not so fast,,,

In 1976, the DOJ determined the Statute Of Limitations would not apply,,,

AND, the real reason for the John Doe warrant was for "publicity".

The "public" perception of perpetual leverage over a suspect.

slimpublicity.jpeg.4a4699c89f684035b4837b72d5ca7ac3.jpeg

Edited by FLYJACK

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We're splitting hairs here. The FBI had to ask the DOJ's legal opinion. That means nobody was really sure what the hell the deal was. When this John Doe warrant application went up in front of any Federal judge, and the grand jury, it would be a matter of opinion on the judge's part with input from the grand jury. The statute applied after five years on air piracy, and is based on the actual statutes that were in place at Cooper's time. The possible sentence itself, including a possible death sentence, has nothing to do with this. But the FBI was able to argue sucessfully in Portland that day for a John Doe warrant, saying the five year limit was inherently unjust due to the possible sentence a defendant could receive, up to and including death. Usually, an application for a warrant needs no more than a judge's signature and can be done in the middle of the night if necessary at the judge's home. But this one had to go to the grand jury because of the conflicting issues involved here. Air piracy was a relatively new crime, a new phenomenon, and some of the questions and issues involved in it were quite esoteric.  

A defense attorney representing Cooper...if Cooper were caught or came forward after the five year period...would have a good argument saying that the statute had run on Cooper and it was too late for the Feds to prosecute. The prosecution would have countered with the possible sentence for the crime, saying the statute was justifiably moot in this case. No telling how it would have gone. Both sides would have an argument. 

If the Feds were not worried about this possibility, (that the statute would kick in on 11/24/76) they would not have talked about it, and they would not have gone in front of that Federal judge and a grand jury at the very last minute to get their John Doe warrant. But nothing is free and easy and clear in a case where someone could conceivably get the death penalty...yet never actually kills anyone. 

At the time of the Cooper hijacking, the Statute of Limitations on that crime was five years, and would apply if the FBI never identified their suspect. The DOJ's opinion is that because it is a crime with a possible death penalty, that the Statute would not apply. And if this had ever come up in a Federal court it would have been a very interesting debate indeed. After Cooper, the law was changed disallowing any Statute of Limitations on air piracy. 

Remember....the Statute of Limitations on certain crimes is also related to your Constitutional rights. That is the reason for its existence. 

 

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(edited)

I thought I would share my latest post to my friends at Facebook and Quora. Not that most of you deserve it, or have any real idea what's going on. But because many of you practice exclusion, compartmentalization, or have websites where the links don't work with the public.

Not my fault. That is your choice entirely. B)

No photo description available.

Quote

'The china cabinet on top of the truck was tricky but I managed it okay. Susan is now the new CFO of Adventure Books of Seattle, and ever since, we have been moving in paperback very well. It's all good. AB has always been a sideline anyway, not my real job. The deposits come to the bank or PayPal each month whether I want them to or not. And of course I want them to. (*smiles*) I'm pretty sure that Sue and I are both happier than we have ever been in many years. Not because of books. But because we love each other very much. Let's just say my previous relationship was non-productive and void of love. Basically, it just sucked. I hid the situation from everyone, even my best friend Greg the Techie Guy at Adventure Books. Now he wishes us well. I had no qualms about walking away from the whole thing.  It was the smartest thing I ever did. As I was driving away, this person said to me: "You're not even sad about this. And we've been together for 20 years. " No kidding. Nothing to be sad about. After seven years of sleeping on separate floors, I finally got the the hint. What Sue taught me was that I did not deserve to be treated like that.  https://www.adventurebooksofseattle.com/thestaff.htm

S1_A2.jpg.931964cf042de44c31ebfb553f27923c.jpg

I think some of you have lives that are REALLY boring. ¬¬

 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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11 hours ago, RobertMBlevins said:

We're splitting hairs here. The FBI had to ask the DOJ's legal opinion. That means nobody was really sure what the hell the deal was. When this John Doe warrant application went up in front of any Federal judge, and the grand jury, it would be a matter of opinion on the judge's part with input from the grand jury. The statute applied after five years on air piracy, and is based on the actual statutes that were in place at Cooper's time. The possible sentence itself, including a possible death sentence, has nothing to do with this. But the FBI was able to argue sucessfully in Portland that day for a John Doe warrant, saying the five year limit was inherently unjust due to the possible sentence a defendant could receive, up to and including death. Usually, an application for a warrant needs no more than a judge's signature and can be done in the middle of the night if necessary at the judge's home. But this one had to go to the grand jury because of the conflicting issues involved here. Air piracy was a relatively new crime, a new phenomenon, and some of the questions and issues involved in it were quite esoteric.  

A defense attorney representing Cooper...if Cooper were caught or came forward after the five year period...would have a good argument saying that the statute had run on Cooper and it was too late for the Feds to prosecute. The prosecution would have countered with the possible sentence for the crime, saying the statute was justifiably moot in this case. No telling how it would have gone. Both sides would have an argument. 

If the Feds were not worried about this possibility, (that the statute would kick in on 11/24/76) they would not have talked about it, and they would not have gone in front of that Federal judge and a grand jury at the very last minute to get their John Doe warrant. But nothing is free and easy and clear in a case where someone could conceivably get the death penalty...yet never actually kills anyone. 

At the time of the Cooper hijacking, the Statute of Limitations on that crime was five years, and would apply if the FBI never identified their suspect. The DOJ's opinion is that because it is a crime with a possible death penalty, that the Statute would not apply. And if this had ever come up in a Federal court it would have been a very interesting debate indeed. After Cooper, the law was changed disallowing any Statute of Limitations on air piracy. 

Remember....the Statute of Limitations on certain crimes is also related to your Constitutional rights. That is the reason for its existence. 

 

Not splitting hairs..

The FBI does investigations and may recommend a case to the Prosecutor.. The Prosecutor decides whether the case should proceed..  not the FBI. 

OF COURSE THE DOJ CALLS THE SHOTS...

In theory, they proceed based on the probability of winning but in reality there are other (dubious) considerations.

In fact, the Prosecutor has no obligation to reveal any case that was rejected. 

If the FBI recommended charges for a Cooper suspect and the DOJ rejected the case we would never know.

 

The DOJ's opinion was that the statute of limitations did not apply, John Doe warrants are controversial and may not have been constitutional. 

 

The purpose of the John Doe warrant was for public perception and to create a point of leverage over a potential Cooper suspect. 

At the same time the FBI admitted they didn't have the evidence and required the cooperation of Cooper to bring a prosecution.

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5 hours ago, RobertMBlevins said:

Well, since you seem to know everything there is to know about this question, and I obviously do not...I will leave the answering of it up to you and just get out of your way. B)

No, I don't know everything, nobody does..

I do know that you have this wrong and doubled down.

When I showed you the 1976 DOJ stating that the SOL would not apply contradicting your claim, you tossed it aside and tried to discredit it instead of re-evaluating your position.

So, they knew the SOL didn't apply and went ahead with a last minute John Doe warrant.. maybe there was another reason for that other than the SOL.

 

But, I don't see this as very important.

 

The speculation that Cooper threw money into the River to be found to throw of investigators makes no sense whatsoever. Tossing money into the River would have zero expectation of being found. That is Ulis crazy.

 

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(edited)
Quote

I do know that you have this wrong and doubled down.

When I showed you the 1976 DOJ stating that the SOL would not apply contradicting your claim, you tossed it aside and tried to discredit it instead of re-evaluating your position.

Robert says: At the time of the Cooper hijacking, the Statute of Limitations on Air Piracy was five years. This was changed later, AFTER Cooper. This fact was harped on time and again by Northwest media for at least two years prior to the expiration date of 11/24/1976.

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So, they knew the SOL didn't apply and went ahead with a last minute John Doe warrant.. maybe there was another reason for that other than the SOL.

Robert says:  The DOJ gave their opinion on whether the five year limit would actually hold up in court. That was an opinion based on the idea that if they caught Cooper after the five year limit, would they be able to prosecute? Their opinion was that yes...they could prosecute based on the idea that it was a capital crime...and such a prosecution might be successful. But it was still an opinion. The DOJ does not make court rulings. Judges do. If there were truly no statute of limitations on the books for Cooper, the FBI would not have bothered going up in front of a Federal judge and the Grand Jury to get a John Doe warrant issued. This was a 'just in case' move by the FBI. Just in case some hot shot lawyer could get Cooper off...should he be caught after 11/24/1976....based on the original statute. As I said previously....there was an argument on both sides here. A good defense lawyer could claim double jeopardy. He could say, "Capital or not, your honor...it is a fact that there WAS a five year limit on this crime when my client was arrested...and therefore according to the law that was IN PLACE at the time of the hijacking...my client should not be prosecuted." (Of course, later they could still charge Cooper under the Hobbs Act, but that is a different story.) The Hobbs Act is not in itself a capital crime. And believe it or not, neither is air piracy....UNLESS a death is involved...and there was no death in the Cooper caper of course. 

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But, I don't see this as very important.

Robert says: Perhaps, but we're not really talking about the law here so much as we are MOTIVATION to do something. Cooper is out there. If he's any kind of guy, he is also seeing the parade of articles and TV news bits harping on the fact that the SOL is coming up on 11/24/76....just like everybody else is seeing. So he has to assume it is true, or all the news organizations wouldn't keep running stories about it, and sometimes speculating whether Cooper might come forward after the SOL date. 

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The speculation that Cooper threw money into the River to be found to throw of investigators makes no sense whatsoever. Tossing money into the River would have zero expectation of being found. That is Ulis crazy.

Please don't compare me to Eric Ulis. I don't go around telling outright tales on a suspect to convince people he is guilty, as Ulis did with Sheridan Peterson. We're not even living on the same planet when it comes to the Cooper case. 

My opinion is that disposing of a small portion of the money, if it was done AFTER the news came out that Cooper would not be going free and clear after all...after the John Doe warrant was issued...make PERFECT sense. If you were Cooper, and realized the FBI had done an end-around on you with some friendly Federal judge down in Portland...and now the FBI would be hunting you for the rest of your life...would YOU just sit there and do nothing? Maybe Cooper decided to do something, and before he did he may have considered ways to take action. 

This isn't even a stretch of the facts. We already know Cooper didn't land in the Columbia. He bailed before that point, so if there isn't any conceivable water delivery path between where he jumped and where he found the money...how do explain how it traveled all that way without human intervention or human hands being involved? (From an old statement by Tom Kaye)

Toss a bundle into the woods? Even if someone finds it, and the FBI shows up to search, they will figure out pretty quick it was a plant and re-double their efforts to find Cooper. 

Into a lake? It would never be found anyway. 

Into the Columbia, not far from Tina Bar? Now that would definitely confuse everyone. No one could say for certain how it got there, just that it did. It would create more questions than answers. It might even make the FBI believe Cooper was dead. Those last four points by the way, are all TRUE. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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