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Oxford shoes has been mentioned before in media reports and by the FBI..

Technically, oxfords are the type of lacing, but may be a generic term for street shoes. The shoes were also described as "non-lace type shoes of ankle length", so that doesn't jive.

Doubtful, the witnesses used the term oxford in the technical sense.

But, they were not LOAFERS...

 

oxfordshoes.jpeg.9d35f5940ff84e75154f6d467ceba61e.jpeg

anklelength.jpg.571a0681fc4912be1fbbc7b8af657f06.jpg

 

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(edited)

These so-called 'file releases' by the FBI are so heavily redacted as to be nearly useless. Pretty much anything you could use to identify a particular suspect, or a witness, or any relevant facts...has been edited from the documents. 

I have learned three things from reviewing these documents. 

  1. The FBI was heavily focused on the idea for years that Cooper was a regular skydiver who probably had a favorite dropzone. It never occurred to them that because Cooper was dressed so poorly for the jump, that Cooper might not have been a 'regular' in the skydiving world. 
     
  2. Everybody and his brother thought they knew the identity of Cooper, and the FBI was absolutely flooded with tips. Too many, in fact, to properly investigate. One after another, names (redacted, of course) come in, and one after another they are dismissed. They wasted their time chasing one dead end after another, all without result. 
     
  3. Because of all this, even if they had received a tip that turned out to be valid, the FBI probably would have missed it anyway. I think they actually got used to the idea that the tips were mostly a waste of time, and this tainted their approach to suspects. After so many false leads, instead of investigating each one as possibly valid, they would look for the easiest way to eliminate that suspect...and move on to the next twenty tips or so. 

In the end, the FBI missed the most important clue of all. Who would be the kind of person that obviously knew how an NB-8 container worked...but who also came so poorly dressed for the occasion? To me, this points to a guy who had military jump experience, but had not jumped as a civilian, and had not jumped at all for a long time. Yes...that description *could* fit Kenny Christiansen. But it could also fit just about any veteran of a paratrooper company over the last twenty years PRIOR to the hijacking. A middle-aged man, with obvious experience in military jumps, (Mucklow testified that Cooper seemed to know what he was doing when he put on the parachute) who drank, who smoked, and who dressed like he didn't have much money for a decent wardrobe, even to do a most dangerous jump. A guy who said he wanted to go to Mexico, but knew the Pacific Northwest fairly well, and how to get a jet to fly as slow as possible...but got off the ride less than an hour after the takeoff from Seattle. 

CONCLUSIONS:
Cooper was a middle-aged guy who never saw a dropzone other than a military one, had not jumped in quite some time, and was desperate for money. Cooper never had the slightest intention of going to Mexico, or even Reno for that matter. He just said that to throw off any possible search, and probably didn't know that the crew...even if they were made to stay in the cockpit...would be able to figure out approximately when and where he jumped. The FBI had him pegged as a civilian jumper, which means they proceeded from a false assumption right from the start. If he had been a civilian jumper in his mid-40's, he would have at least worn the proper shoes. He would know to do that. This crime almost sounds like a guy who had been pushed to the edge by circumstances, knew how to use a chute but nothing much about crime, and his plan was probably hastily thought out over a period of no more than a few weeks prior to the crime. He was the luckiest guy on the face of the planet, and should have been caught, but wasn't. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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1 hour ago, RobertMBlevins said:

These so-called 'file releases' by the FBI are so heavily redacted as to be nearly useless. Pretty much anything you could use to identify a particular suspect, or a witness, or any relevant facts...has been edited from the documents. 

I have learned three things from reviewing these documents. 

  1. The FBI was heavily focused on the idea for years that Cooper was a regular skydiver who probably had a favorite dropzone. It never occurred to them that because Cooper was dressed so poorly for the jump, that Cooper might not have been a 'regular' in the skydiving world. 
     
  2. Everybody and his brother thought they knew the identity of Cooper, and the FBI was absolutely flooded with tips. Too many, in fact, to properly investigate. One after another, names (redacted, of course) come in, and one after another they are dismissed. They wasted their time chasing one dead end after another, all without result. 
     
  3. Because of all this, even if they had received a tip that turned out to be valid, the FBI probably would have missed it anyway. I think they actually got used to the idea that the tips were mostly a waste of time, and this tainted their approach to suspects. After so many false leads, instead of investigating each one as possibly valid, they would look for the easiest way to eliminate that suspect...and move on to the next twenty tips or so. 

In the end, the FBI missed the most important clue of all. Who would be the kind of person that obviously knew how an NB-8 container worked...but who also came so poorly dressed for the occasion? To me, this points to a guy who had military jump experience, but had not jumped as a civilian, and had not jumped at all for a long time. Yes...that description *could* fit Kenny Christiansen. But it could also fit just about any veteran of a paratrooper company over the last twenty years PRIOR to the hijacking. A middle-aged man, with obvious experience in military jumps, (Mucklow testified that Cooper seemed to know what he was doing when he put on the parachute) who drank, who smoked, and who dressed like he didn't have much money for a decent wardrobe, even to do a most dangerous jump. A guy who said he wanted to go to Mexico, but knew the Pacific Northwest fairly well, and how to get a jet to fly as slow as possible...but got off the ride less than an hour after the takeoff from Seattle. 

CONCLUSIONS:
Cooper was a middle-aged guy who never saw a dropzone other than a military one, had not jumped in quite some time, and was desperate for money. Cooper never had the slightest intention of going to Mexico, or even Reno for that matter. He just said that to throw off any possible search, and probably didn't know that the crew...even if they were made to stay in the cockpit...would be able to figure out approximately when and where he jumped. The FBI had him pegged as a civilian jumper, which means they proceeded from a false assumption right from the start. If he had been a civilian jumper in his mid-40's, he would have at least worn the proper shoes. He would know to do that. This crime almost sounds like a guy who had been pushed to the edge by circumstances, knew how to use a chute but nothing much about crime, and his plan was probably hastily thought out over a period of no more than a few weeks prior to the crime. He was the luckiest guy on the face of the planet, and should have been caught, but wasn't. 

There is a lot of valuable information in these documents, especially in regards to the named suspects like Duane Weber, Rackstraw and McCoy. There is also a lot of information on the "unresolved" suspects like the Egg Harbor Suspect and the Shelton Lead, but you have to read through the documents and the redactions to find it.

To say that less information is better than more information is to confuse the distinction between the signal and the noise. More noise is fine, if one can find the signal contained therein.

#57 had more information on one of those unresolved suspects, and was of great interest.

 

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1 hour ago, Andrade1812 said:

There is a lot of valuable information in these documents, especially in regards to the named suspects like Duane Weber, Rackstraw and McCoy. There is also a lot of information on the "unresolved" suspects like the Egg Harbor Suspect and the Shelton Lead, but you have to read through the documents and the redactions to find it.

To say that less information is better than more information is to confuse the distinction between the signal and the noise. More noise is fine, if one can find the signal contained therein.

#57 had more information on one of those unresolved suspects, and was of great interest.

 

If there was anything of great interest, the FBI would have solved the case long ago. 

Personally, I would like to see any and all files from between 2006-until July 2016. At the rate the FBI is releasing these files, it will be years before they ever get that far. I will give you that there have been occasional entries in those files about relevant suspects, but none of those files really lead anybody to the true identity of the hijacker. 

It would help if they didn't redact the files so heavily as well. Geoff Gray somehow managed to get at least a portion of the UN-redacted files released to him. And he is a civilian. I have often wondered how exactly he managed that. He had a good source, but like all good reporters, he kept the source anonymous. And if he got SOME of the unedited files released, he probably could have gotten the rest. But...he told me once he was put off by all the craziness that surrounds the Cooper case, and decided to get out. 

EDIT: Even though some of you folks would never admit it, I know you want updates on the only other Cooper event currently scheduled this year...the Cooper Party in July. Situation is still the same. We're running the ad through June 5th. If we don't have enough interest in the event, I will cancel it and just invite everyone on the email lists to a private party, probably in the Olympics, and then delete the pages from the AB site, as well as the Quora and WordPress stuff. At this point, I can live with either option. Currently, we have three people scheduled to do presentations, and if I held the party next weekend, maybe 40 people would actually show up. Not enough yet to release the main budget. We will see what happens over the next two months. I told Greg the Techie Guy yesterday that a trip to the Oregon coast is out, and even if we don't get enough people to hold the main event...that we DO owe the people who have signed to go so far. Most are coming from the Seattle/Tacoma area, although a few are from Bend and Portland. So going to the Olympics instead would be a shorter drive for them. I have a feeling this is exactly how it will turn out. Eight weeks to Decision Day, and I just don't see us getting 120-150 people. Maybe 60 or 70 by June. 

In that case, it will be more booze, and less on the Amazon gift cards. (*laughs*) That was a joke. 

The truth is, I'm not even sure the four of us could handle it if we actually got the full crowd. (Greg, Gayla, Kyle, myself) And Gayla would only be hauling some of the gear, not staying for the weekend. Maybe we bit off more than we could successfully chew. Maybe just a smaller party in the Olympics, like we used to do for the Cooper Campouts, will work just as well. Only this time we're better equipped. ^_^ I'm starting to hope the ad fails, no kidding. I think Greg is too. We would do it if there is enough interest, but part of us now wishes there isn't enough interest. I think this whole thing would have been easier had not a pandemic swept America and killed a half million people so far. It has affected damn near everything on every level conceivable. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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50 minutes ago, Andrade1812 said:

The FBI couldn't *prosecute* the case, but that doesn't mean they didn't solve it. Based on what I'm seeing it looks like they believed they had a suspect they thought was Cooper, but couldn't prove it in court.

Well, Agent John Jarvis indicated to three confirmed witnesses (all with security clearances, all worked in the WA DC area) that the reason the FBI dropped the case was that they knew it was Kenny. But that doesn't make it true that Kenny was Cooper. 

If the FBI really had a viable suspect, they would have at least brought him in for some heavy-duty questioning. I don't know if you've ever dealt with the Feds on a legal level...but I have...and they are serious business. They can often bring someone who has resolved to lie to them right to Jesus, and in a quick-fast New York hurry. Was this alleged suspect ever brought in for questioning? And I don't mean a quick interview at the guy's door...but 'downtown' as they say. I was questioned in this way many years ago by the FBI, and even a supposed tough guy like me was scared shitless. 

They do that to people. 

EDIT: Which suspect are you referring to?

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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4 hours ago, RobertMBlevins said:

The FBI was heavily focused on the idea for years that Cooper was a regular skydiver who probably had a favorite dropzone. It never occurred to them that because Cooper was dressed so poorly for the jump, that Cooper might not have been a 'regular' in the skydiving world. 

People get a narrative in their mind, and no answer or additional information will sway it. This has been addressed. It would be no problem to jump in a suit. The only problem might be the tie slapping you in the face, and he left that behind. But many people have jumped in suits, including ties, either emulating Cooper, or for business card photos, or whatever. People have jumped in street clothes, Santa Suits, various other costumes, or buck ass naked. It's not a problem. As for the shoes, Flyjack has shown shoes that would fit the descriptions and be just fine, or you yourself have speculated that he might have had other shoes in that bag. Now, whether he was dressed inappropriately for the environment he landed in, that's another matter. But for the jump itself, no problem, just button the coat.

And it's not just you. There's a guy at the Forum who probably still envisions Cooper exerting definitive control over a non-steerable round, despite two experienced jumpers telling him no.

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1 hour ago, dudeman17 said:

People get a narrative in their mind, and no answer or additional information will sway it. This has been addressed. It would be no problem to jump in a suit. The only problem might be the tie slapping you in the face, and he left that behind. But many people have jumped in suits, including ties, either emulating Cooper, or for business card photos, or whatever. People have jumped in street clothes, Santa Suits, various other costumes, or buck ass naked. It's not a problem. As for the shoes, Flyjack has shown shoes that would fit the descriptions and be just fine, or you yourself have speculated that he might have had other shoes in that bag. Now, whether he was dressed inappropriately for the environment he landed in, that's another matter. But for the jump itself, no problem, just button the coat.

And it's not just you. There's a guy at the Forum who probably still envisions Cooper exerting definitive control over a non-steerable round, despite two experienced jumpers telling him no.

I will buy all of this because I know you have extensive experience in the sport. Still...I wonder why Cooper would dress like that knowing for certain he would be doing a night jump and it was close to December. Brrr. But okay, I will still buy it. And there's always the chance he wore long johns under that suit, I don't know. 

People should never mistake me for someone who is an official expert on the Cooper case itself. Before I worked with Skipp Porteous, I was running a sci fi mag and cranking out sci fi stories and the occasional book. Also sci-fi. Before 2009, I didn't know any more about DB Cooper than your average Northwest guy, and spent all my free time hiking, camping, and fishing. To counter the lies regarding my relationship with Porteous, I got along great with him and he invited me to visit him in Morro Bay, California more than once. But then he started getting ill with that aphasia stuff and the poor guy went downhill from there pretty quickly. Within a few months he could hardly use a keyboard and his messages were hard to interpret sometimes. We exchanged messages almost up until the day he died, and his family members are still Facebook friends. Those things you read about him hating the book, etc and wanting nothing to do with me are just fables. The reasons we never met in person were because he lived in New York for most of the time I knew him, and because I was too busy to travel to Morro Bay after he moved there after his divorce from Hannah. And then when I finally considered making the trip (it's 1,200 miles), he got sick, and then his girlfriend there broke up with him, and he ended up in Florida with his family, where he died. It's too bad, because I wish I had taken the time to accept his invitations. I have sometimes felt guilty about that. 

Quote

 

EDIT: Which suspect are you referring to?

There are two, the man from Shelton, and the man from Egg Harbor.

 

Not real familiar with these two. So many suspects...

Oh...no big deal but I found out the case of 52 books that were printed up via Espresso Machine weren't done in New York. The Lightning Source report I got today says it was in Italy. I did not know they had the machines going there. Who the hell in ITALY would want 52 copies of Blast? And why? Another mystery for the record I guess. I know some folks will want me to 'prove' this, so here is a picture from the report. I blanked out our account number at LSI. These reports come in individually each month, for each market in which you had sales. Most sales come from US, Great Britain, or European market. Some from Australia or Asia, and rarely from South America. Italy counts as European sale, of course. 

 

TheItalianJob.jpg

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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Brrr indeed. My guess is that he dressed the way he did so as not to stand out in the terminal and the plane. The fewer people that take note of him, the fewer people that can describe/recognize him. The long johns would certainly be a good idea. And his exposure time in the air wouldn't be all that long, even if he opened right away, and certainly less if he was experienced and freefell down before opening. One thing I'm not sure about is the elevation of the ground below him. Subtract that from the 10k msl the plane was at, and that's his actual jump altitude.

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It is common theme/claim that Cooper wanted to jump in the PNW. Mexico was a ruse.

Nobody has any evidence for that..  none.

 

 

He asked to fly to anywhere in Mexico for fuel, don't land in US for any reason.

He INITIALLY asked for airstairs to be lowered in flight. He changed the demand when Reno was in play.

The pilots said "American" currency and Tina said he told her "US" currency, that suggests an international influence.

Cooper was described as Latin in appearance and characteristics. The FBI considered a Mexican connection.

He was not dressed for the PNW climate or weather that night.

He gave no flight path. The chute was virtually un-steerable.

Cooper really had no way to target an LZ.

 

Those factors indicate that Cooper initially planned to jump much further south... he adapted and decided to jump sooner when Reno was in play. 

Being on the plane landing in Reno with the money and no passengers and authorities waiting would have made the decision to jump earlier than planned an easy one. That is why he changed his demand to airstairs down on takeoff. He changed his plan. He wanted out ASAP..

 

If Reno wasn't in play,, once the plane was further South closer to his initial LZ, Cooper would have given precise flight path instructions. That never happened because his plan changed.

 

 

Edited by FLYJACK

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The FBI admitted in the mid 70's that there wasn't enough evidence to convict anyone unless Cooper co-operated. Given the age, Cooper is certainly dead. But, that was pre-DNA. Today, the only way to solve this is with new DNA which is virtually impossible to get.. 

Finding any chutes now is useless. The FBI didn't have the serial numbers and Cossey can't ID them now.

Conclusion, this can't be solved to a "legal" threshold, the best we can do is a "public" standard. 

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Somewhat to my surprise, I just received (by snail mail) a response to a FOIA request that I had submitted on 09.18.2020, regarding the "sled test" film. Instead of the standard rejection letter (of which I now have quite a collection), the FBI sent me the five pages below. I believe that the photos are familiar from n467us.com and from Ralph Himmelsbach's book, but I'm not sure that the two cover pages have been released before. The redacted name is presumably Capt. Thomas Spangler. I don't know what to make of the phrase "These will not be used".

The five photos have only two variants. I have the impression that the tail number N467US has been drawn by hand on one image, and airbrushed out on another.

720110 164-81-1A p1.pdf 720110 164-81-1A p2.pdf 720110 164-81-1A p3.pdf 720110 164-81-1A p4.pdf 720110 164-81-1A p5.pdf

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21 hours ago, RobertMBlevins said:

Well, Agent John Jarvis indicated to three confirmed witnesses (all with security clearances, all worked in the WA DC area) 

 

You bring this up a lot. A security clearance does not make a person any more honorable or any less of a liar than anyone else. I live within 20 minutes of a Nuclear Facility. It's the facility where the atomic bomb was developed, and it's the same facility that several years ago hijackers threatened to crash a plane in to. I even worked there for a short period of time myself (you guessed it, scrubbing toilets). It employs several thousand people in this area. I know several people that work there, more than I could possibly name. Everyone that works there has to have a security clearance. There are several of them that I wouldn't trust farther than I could spit, and several that I would not believe even if they told me something I knew to be true. The security clearance only means that they have been deemed not a threat to sell or give away secret information. That's all. So please quit with this narrative that because these individuals had a security clearance, that their story becomes much more believable. It doesn't.

Edited by ParrotheadVol

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8 hours ago, ParrotheadVol said:

You bring this up a lot. A security clearance does not make a person any more honorable or any less of a liar than anyone else. I live within 20 minutes of a Nuclear Facility. It's the facility where the atomic bomb was developed, and it's the same facility that several years ago hijackers threatened to crash a plane in to. I even worked there for a short period of time myself (you guessed it, scrubbing toilets). It employs several thousand people in this area. I know several people that work there, more than I could possibly name. Everyone that works there has to have a security clearance. There are several of them that I wouldn't trust farther than I could spit, and several that I would not believe even if they told me something I knew to be true. The security clearance only means that they have been deemed not a threat to sell or give away secret information. That's all. So please quit with this narrative that because these individuals had a security clearance, that their story becomes much more believable. It doesn't.

This story is QUITE believable, which is the problem you and some of your friends at the Cooper Forum have going about it. Troy Bentz, a decent man with a wife and two children, is an engineer working in R & D for the US Navy. His two friends are basically in the same jobs, but at a different location in DC. We tried finding holes in their story, as well as their characters, (we even ran our own background checks on them) and we could find absolutely no reason to disbelieve their story. 

johnjarvisFBI.jpg.549d062c38b0882cfba1b71f353cd9ba.jpg

Your living near Oak Ridge has nothing to do with this situation. Or even our combined experiences with toilets for that matter. And I have no intention of 'quitting this narrative'. In fact, it is discussed heavily, with names and all details included, in my upcoming book Cooperland. Troy Bentz' wife was very angry with him for even coming forward to us and giving us all the information he did. You have to remember that these three men testified that a high-ranking FBI agent indicated to them that Kenny Christiansen was indeed Cooper, and even indicated the reason it was not announced publicly:  Because Christiansen was dead anyway. One added bit that may or may not be coincidence is this: If what Agent Jarvis said is true, then the FBI closed the case exactly one year after they received our 54 page report on Christiansen and Bernie Geestman, along with the other things they received in that package. (Mostly photos, documents with notes, etc on a CD disk.) 

You understand that all three of these men could be fired from their jobs and lose their clearances...as well as their careers...for coming forward? Do you grasp the depth of this risk? Why would they do that? To pull my chain? To get a laugh? To get in trouble with the FBI for going public with a big lie about an FBI agent who had been (at that time) with the Bureau for more than 15 years, and worked in Behavioral Profiling at Quantico? The correct answer is NONE OF THE ABOVE.

Bentz' wife warned him that their kids did swim team with not only active duty personnel's families, but the families of FBI agents as well. Yet Bentz was brave enough to lay out what happened that day very well. And then his two friends backed up his story as well. He was not afraid, although he asked me to keep his name out of it for a year if I went public on this story, which I did for him. But yes...I eventually went public. 

Bentz and I exchanged quite a few emails, and some phone calls regarding this allegation. In the end, I am sure it happened just the way he and his two friends said. The real question here isn't whether Bentz and his friends just made up a story to impress little old me. The REAL question is whether Special Agent John Jarvis was in possession of information not generally known outside the higher-ups in the FBI. The fact that all three men actually NAMED Jarvis as the person who told them this information is significant. It wasn't like they claimed, 'some guy in the FBI told us'. They actually named him because at least two of the witnesses knew Jarvis personally. Prior to the revelation, Agent Jarvis had even discussed some of the more high-profile cases he had worked on when he was a field agent. It is extremely unlikely he lied to his friends, especially being a long term veteran of the Bureau with a job such as he had in profiling at the FBI. It is much MORE likely that he was indeed privy to certain information that even the general rank and file did not know. 

I can tell you this much. The decision to close the Cooper case did not come from the Seattle office. That's just where it was announced to the press. That decision to close came from someone a bit higher-up in DC. I know this based on two facts. An admittance that this was what happened from Agent Fred Gutt in Seattle. And because several FBI offices were actively involved in the Cooper case, not just Seattle. 

Quote

"Some in this office think he's a good suspect. Others believe there are better suspects..."

(Special Agent Fred Gutt in Seattle, referring to whether Christiansen had been dismissed as a suspect in the Cooper case. They received the full report on Christiansen about a year later.)

I suppose I should ask the obvious question. Would you blindly question this allegation as much as you do if it were Bruce Smith who had received the initial contact from Troy Bentz? I very much doubt it. 

But there are differences between myself, Bruce, and Eric Ulis. 

I do not allow people using the same names as some people appearing this year at the Cooper Con to make filthy comments about others on my own websites. That is foolish. Maybe you should question that occasionally. If Cooper Con gets about the same attendance as last time, some of your own participants will be to blame. You guys do absolutely no self-policing on either facts, or common sense at all. Or very little. It's possible that some of these people may need a hard lesson in manners to get the point. In other words, that you can't expect people to take you seriously as a legitimate investigator/speaker/book author in the Cooper case. 

And I, unlike Eric, do not simply make things up about a suspect in order to prove my point, and then expect people to follow me like the Pied Piper of Hamelin, without questioning those lies. 

And the really funny thing is that none of you question these things as much as you question me. Which in my mind means I must possess more character than you.

Even I draw the line somewhere. It's doubtful that the theater will be a sellout, but it is possible that attendance, partially due to the pandemic, will be even less than the last time. You don't help yourselves by failing to set standards. It just makes the entire group look childish, and unprofessional. 

And by the way...the more over-the-top negativity that happens in Cooperland with my name, or the names of my friends attached to this...the more books I sell. We broke all records for sales between March 2020-March 2021. So I suppose you are doing me a favor. But you certainly don't establish yourselves to be taken seriously, or to encourage people to drop over twenty bucks a seat to hear you talk. B)

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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A number of suspects have FBI agents in their corner. If there was one suspect that had all the agents in his corners, I’d give it some attention. But there isn’t. This case has investigators that are practically PhD level into Cooper. Frankly, they know more about the case than most if not all the FBI agents. These agents had many other cases that they were on. They moved on or came to the case late. Outside of Blevins, I don’t think a single Cooper researcher thinks there is any chance that Christianson is Cooper. None. That suspect has only created noise in the system and taken away focus from the case. 

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28 minutes ago, CooperNWO305 said:

A number of suspects have FBI agents in their corner. If there was one suspect that had all the agents in his corners, I’d give it some attention. But there isn’t. This case has investigators that are practically PhD level into Cooper. Frankly, they know more about the case than most if not all the FBI agents. These agents had many other cases that they were on. They moved on or came to the case late. Outside of Blevins, I don’t think a single Cooper researcher thinks there is any chance that Christianson is Cooper. None. That suspect has only created noise in the system and taken away focus from the case. 

We're not talking about what investigators believe. Many of them involved in the case either have their own favorite suspect, or they have personal issues going. That is easily proven. 

It's not whether Cooperland believes KC is Cooper. It is what can be proven, and where the truth is. It is the only thing that matters. The sheer volume of personal attacks only proves they are worried. There's nothing like investing years of emotional garbage in a single point, and then finding out you might have been wrong the whole time. 

1 hour ago, Andrade1812 said:

Jarvis was a profiler? Did he ever work on, or was he ever otherwise assigned to the Cooper case?

Ask him. 

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2 hours ago, RobertMBlevins said:

We're not talking about what investigators believe. Many of them involved in the case either have their own favorite suspect, or they have personal issues going. That is easily proven. 

It's not whether Cooperland believes KC is Cooper. It is what can be proven, and where the truth is. It is the only thing that matters. The sheer volume of personal attacks only proves they are worried. There's nothing like investing years of emotional garbage in a single point, and then finding out you might have been wrong the whole time. 

Ask him. 

So you don't know? I'm confused...

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7 hours ago, ParrotheadVol said:

Maybe someone that's having a Cooper campout, and needs to build a really big fire??

Very funny. It was probably a bookstore or some retailer in Italy.

As far as the answer to your other question, I am not a reporter. Any further investigation into the Bentz allegation needs to be done by a professional. I just presented what was available, but I have also said I would be more than happy to reveal full details to any legitimate reporter who inquires, in case they want to check the story. This one, since it involves a reasonably high-ranking FBI agent, needs to be explored by someone with the proper access and credentials. You could say it is above my pay grade. (Edit: NO, I do NOT know if Agent Jarvis worked on the Cooper case.)

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"Always with the negative waves, Moriarty...always with the negative waves..."

I do hope you guys get decent attendance to the Cooper Con this year, but your negative stuff is going to end up blowing up in your faces if you don't get your act together...especially when you want more to get in the door than I usually pay to watch a live-performance musical at the local theater. Right now, you have Eric saying he thinks they can sell out 500 tickets, but the last time he didn't even fill a hundred seats. I got that report from someone who was actually there. And what he said was that 'maybe' a hundred, if you count the people on stage. What I see happening is that all the ticket holders will show up the first day, and then on the second day...some of them will stay home. So starting out with a much stronger crowd than the last time would be good. 

I told the guy at the Kiggins in my last email that Adventure Books of Seattle would like to support Cooper Con, even though none of us will be there in person. But that certain participants' behavior on the internet makes it difficult for us to do so. I also suggested that Cooperland support both scheduled events, (Cooper Con and Cooper Party) because we get to go first and it would be easy for us to endorse the other on several levels and venues...even with the media...thereby increasing attendance to BOTH events. Especially YOUR event, since we go first. But who knows? Maybe you don't need any free advertising or support from us. Maybe everything will be fine going on your own, while talking smack about anything we do this year. :handok:

Or maybe it won't be fine. No way to tell just yet. But there's no use in not taking advantage of every opportunity to sell a seat that you can get. 

However, I see some of you folks as SO stubborn...you would rather look out on a bunch of empty seats in November rather than consider any kind of cooperation. Okay. We will see what happens with that approach. And there is something you should know. We actually hope you succeed. We don't WANT you to fail. One thing happened after the last Cooper Con, even though attendance was only poor-to-fair. We sold a lot more books the following month. If you managed somehow to play to a packed house, this would be good for us, and on an even bigger scale. On the other hand, I am not so greedy for book sales that I would support something where non-cooperation, negativity and personal attacks on others for months beforehand are a big side agenda. I have to draw the line here. 

As John Wayne said in the movie, The Alamo:

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"Hold on there, mister. You don't get no lard lessin' you boil the hog..." 

 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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(edited)

Reading the one-way street (yawn, usual stuff) responses by Shutter today over at the Cooper Forum, I am constantly amazed at the lengths he will go to try and make everything I post in the case sound bad. He even looked up the script to the Alamo movie and corrected me on that. 

It was a paraphrase, ding-dong. Of course I know the line wasn't exactly as I stated. I've seen the movie, just like about every other American, more times than I can count. ^_^

He also thinks I should be pounding on the doors of media and reporters with the Bentz allegations. Andrade thinks he could get Joe Biden's phone number easier than he could get Agent Jarvis' number. I guess Andrade never heard of email. Most FBI agents can be reached by contacting the FBI agent assigned 'media' at whatever office the agent in question works at. You have the media agent forward your email to the agent in question. And if you think I'm going to contact Agent Jarvis on my own, not a chance. I'm just some guy from Seattle and nobody special. You want the press to investigate the Bentz allegations? Then create a report based upon it and send it to the nearest local media. Why should I do your work FOR you? I never said I was a 'Cooper Investigator'. I write books, I edit books, I clean homes, I go out in the wilderness occasionally. I make a pretty good living doing that and I am fine with it. Well...I don't get paid for the wilderness stuff...but if I did I would do that full time. ^_^

You guys bad-mouth just about everything I have done...or WILL do...and you mostly do this using either Bruce Smith's Mountain News with phony identities...or at Shutter's place, because you know that I cannot respond to your (frankly) baloney at either place. You've known about the Bentz allegations for over two years now, and not once did any of you contact me personally like a regular person with some friggin' MANNERS and ask for details. That means email, not insulting, challenging posts on the internet. I do not respond well to that. You can't have your cake and eat it too. 

I went to my Cooper WordPress today and saw I accidentally deleted the article I did about the Bentz allegations, (was going to edit it) so now I suppose I will have to rewrite it and repost it at some point. You can get your basic information from there if you wish. But I'm not going to release the names of the other two witnesses, or where they work, or anything about them in that article. You guys have a real bad habit of going behind peoples' backs and causing trouble. I won't go into details, but we all know this is policy for some of you. On the other hand, every time I come out with something interesting, you want everything and right now...and you want it only at Dropzone. Forgettaboutit. Some stuff I am just NOT going to put out on the internet. 

When November comes and you find out that not only did we not support Cooper Con this year, but instead published a few things about some of the participants beforehand...instead of trying to help you ungrateful jerks fill the seats...you will have brought this on yourselves. I have plenty of justification to do this, but I hesitate to do it because a full house at Cooper Con benefits everybody involved in the Cooper case. Yes, even me. Not that some of you don't deserve to have us come down on you like a load of bricks, because you do deserve that. EU's alleged behavior at the 2019 event, the constant barrage of hateful comments on Smith's website, (a main speaker for Cooper Con who actively supports these comments?) the outright theft of Sheridan's book in violation of copyright, MORE hate spewing at Smith's site by people who are actually scheduled to appear at Cooper Con, yada yada yada...it's a damn big list that goes on and on. I'm lately trying to overlook these things in the interest of the common good. But you don't make it easy for me to do that. No worries. It is unlikely I will bother with showing the public your true nature, if for no other reason because a successful Cooper Con is beneficial to AB of Seattle as well. 

However, if you can't fill the seats in November, then maybe for once you will admit I was probably right when I said cooperation between the only two events scheduled for the 50th anniversary was a good idea. But you guys can't put that hatred in your back pockets and do what you need to do. You are not hurting us. You are hurting yourselves. The book on KC continues to sell (a full ten years after its release) at record rates, and if I held the Cooper Party a week from now, we would still get maybe 40-50 people to show up. Who knows how many people we will have lined up by June 5? Or, as Greg says, how many people will simply drive up that weekend and jump into the fun. That general area north of Mt. Rainier is extremely popular on weekends. We will get drop-ins, I'm sure. The ad is also still running on it, and will continue to run until at least June 5, and three or four inquiries about it come in each week, plus the folks who contact us who saw the information about it at Quora or WordPress, or maybe the main AB of Seattle website. You aren't stopping anything. You aren't even slowing us down. 

You should take advantage of the fact that AB probably CAN help you fill those 500 seats that EU wants to sell out. But you probably won't. You always let your emotions get in the way of common sense, or what is best. You've been doing that for years. Why should you change up now? B) 

This is pretty much your last chance, Cooper Fans and Folk. After the 50th anniversary passes, if you haven't made a big hit down in Vancouver, you never will. At this point, I don't see where anything has changed from the last time. And there is the pandemic to deal with...now you have to convince people who are reluctant to gather in groups anyway that they should cough up $21.50 to attend. There is already a built-in reticence to unnecessary group gatherings as it is. You need all the help you can friggin' get. If you don't score a hit THIS year...it could be the last time Eric coughs up the money to do another Cooper Con. We've been promoting the Cooper Party since last November, so we know how tough it is to get people to commit to some group gathering, for whatever reason it is. And we're not even charging money. We're actually offering nice prizes and free food, and still...it's only been the last 4-6 weeks where we finally started getting some real interest from people. The pandemic has not made it easy, and you will be no exception. When you discuss these things among yourselves, remember the Prime Directive:  Shutter's opinion means next to zero because he is not paying for a plane ticket from Florida to attend. HE is not spending his hard-earned money (like some of you are) to drive to Vancouver. He is not spending his money on a hotel room. He is operating from a simple dislike of me personally, and couldn't care less how many people are in the audience when you step up to the podium. He has no commitment to Cooper Con except for allowing comments on your participation, and a thread on the event. But even that isn't too great, because any links you guys post to your 'stuff' is only seen this way by the public, also a 'Shutter Thing':

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'You are not allowed to view links or pictures. Register or login.'

Just saying. 

No skin off my nose, but in my humble opinion you guys need every bit of assistance you can get to ensure you aren't disappointed, or feel at the end you wasted your time and money. Start doing what is best for YOU, and ignore the opinions of people who have a built-in agenda. AB is (*probably*) doing the Cooper Party in July and then we are pretty much out of the Cooper biz after that anyway. At least with the public activities stuff. Maybe a final, smaller campout later to our most trusted friends and fans...and yes...we do have them. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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