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DB Cooper

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Blevins wrote
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Here's something Cooper-related that just came out: They're going to write in Don Draper of Mad Men as the REAL DB Cooper, no kidding. Well, it's not for sure yet, but someone put forward this theory based on supposed clues from this season or something.



That would be a hoot.

The opening graphics show a guy in a suit tumbling in a frefall that looks like a skyscraper BASE jump. Don Draper drinks whiskey and looks enough like Cooper. I can see him schmoozing Tina. The current Mad Men series ends in 68. This could work.

Anyone watch Breaking Bad. I've never met Georger but can't you see him as Hesisenberg? Just kiddin G. ;)

377
2018 marks half a century as a skydiver. Trained by the late Perry Stevens D-51 in 1968.

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I watched Breaking Bad up until that episode where they used the guy in the wheelchair to do the hit. Nothing after that.

Don Draper would make a good Cooper. The smokes, the drink, and as 377 says, definintely the schmoozing with Tina. I think we can cut him from the suspect list, though. He would have had a lighter, not matches, and even if he HAD matches he wouldn't have eaten at SkyChef beforehand to pick them up. He would have had matches from the Hilton.


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Blevins wrote
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Don Draper would make a good Cooper. The smokes, the drink, and as 377 says, definintely the schmoozing with Tina. I think we can cut him from the suspect list, though. He would have had a lighter, not matches, and even if he HAD matches he wouldn't have eaten at SkyChef beforehand to pick them up. He would have had matches from the Hilton.



Good points Robert, but if Don saw a hot babe by herself in the Sky Chef you can bet be would have dropped in. Her phone number would be on the matchbook.

377
2018 marks half a century as a skydiver. Trained by the late Perry Stevens D-51 in 1968.

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This is a bit off-topic, but I think This Article could be one of the best regarding the recent crash in San Francisco.

Only two people were killed, thank God. Remember that. There have been many worse crashes, and you can see them here.

WARNING: It can be creepy and some are tough to listen to, or to read the transcipts. Maybe the people on board that flight got luckier than some, less lucky than others. Tell you this much. If I search out Priceline and it tells me that Asiana is the primary ticket to my destination, I'm shoveling out more money and taking another airline. I like William Shatner but I would have to say no to Asiana. :)


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RobertMBlevins

This is a bit off-topic, but I think This Article could be one of the best regarding the recent crash in San Francisco.

Only two people were killed, thank God. Remember that. There have been many worse crashes, and you can see them here.

WARNING: It can be creepy and some are tough to listen to, or to read the transcipts. Maybe the people on board that flight got luckier than some, less lucky than others. Tell you this much. If I search out Priceline and it tells me that Asiana is the primary ticket to my destination, I'm shoveling out more money and taking another airline. I like William Shatner but I would have to say no to Asiana. :)



Blevins, Don't be so fast to knock Asiana. This type of accident has happened to most airlines. Be patient and wait for the NTSB and Asiana investigations to be completed and an actual cause determined.

Robert99

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Robert99

***This is a bit off-topic, but I think This Article could be one of the best regarding the recent crash in San Francisco.

Only two people were killed, thank God. Remember that. There have been many worse crashes, and you can see them here.

WARNING: It can be creepy and some are tough to listen to, or to read the transcipts. Maybe the people on board that flight got luckier than some, less lucky than others. Tell you this much. If I search out Priceline and it tells me that Asiana is the primary ticket to my destination, I'm shoveling out more money and taking another airline. I like William Shatner but I would have to say no to Asiana. :)



Blevins, Don't be so fast to knock Asiana. This type of accident has happened to most airlines. Be patient and wait for the NTSB and Asiana investigations to be completed and an actual cause determined.

Robert99

I suppose that was a bit of a joke. Although the situation itself is not funny. Reports say the pilot may have had little experience with that type of aircraft. Coming in low, stalling, etc. you are right. Common causes of crashes.


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Based on what the National Transportation Safety Board and other sources have reported thus far, the pilots found themselves in the throes of an unstable approach—apparently below the proper glide path and at too low a speed—and failed to correct or abandon the approach in time. They initiated a go-around—a fairly routine maneuver, referred to by some people as an "aborted landing," in which the approach is broken off and the jet climbs away for a second attempt—but it was too late. How or why they got themselves in this position, and why they did not correct or abandon the landing sooner, remains unknown.

Reportedly, Flight 214's captain was new to the aircraft, and had accrued fewer than 50 total hours in the 777 prior to the accident. While much is being made of this, to me it's a red herring. Pilots transition from aircraft type to aircraft type all the time, and it's not uncommon for a pilot to have a limited number of hours in whichever plane he or she has most recently qualified in. But experience in a particular model and experience overall are different things. All airline pilots are highly trained and are highly experienced before they ever set foot in a jetliner cockpit.

he should have seen his Glide Slope (Glide Path) was off. should of had a cockpit warning of GS being too low?
did he realize past the point of no return to power up and go around?

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/transport/2013/07/asiana_airlines_crash_stop_blaming_sfo_s_runways_and_korea_s_pilots_for.html
"It is surprising how aggressive people get, once they latch onto their suspect and say, 'Hey, he's our guy.' No matter what you tell them, they refuse to believe you" Agent Carr FBI

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apparently he came in too low and slow. here is some video showing the crash...

http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/08/us/asiana-airlines-crash/index.html
"It is surprising how aggressive people get, once they latch onto their suspect and say, 'Hey, he's our guy.' No matter what you tell them, they refuse to believe you" Agent Carr FBI

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I'm not a pilot, but even I know that a pitch-up attitude at stall speed can result in a crash. I suppose maybe if he dropped the nose and went full-power, maybe there was a chance to abort. But...if he does that and can't get altitude because he's trying to gain speed...he could have easily plowed that 777 into something near the ground before he could gain altitude again. And that would have resulted in many more fatalities. (?)

I don't know. Most of the passengers were saved, which is amazing in itself. There have been SO many heartbreaking crashes. My vote for one of the worst was Alaska Airlines Flight 261. That was a heartbreaker for sure. Those pilots tried SO hard to save that plane. After that happened, there were some shake-ups in maintenance at that airline, which is no surprise. I flew one of their 737's down to Phoenix last summer. Nice bounce on the tarmac on arrival, but otherwise okay. :)


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mrshutter45

Based on what the National Transportation Safety Board and other sources have reported thus far, the pilots found themselves in the throes of an unstable approach—apparently below the proper glide path and at too low a speed—and failed to correct or abandon the approach in time. They initiated a go-around—a fairly routine maneuver, referred to by some people as an "aborted landing," in which the approach is broken off and the jet climbs away for a second attempt—but it was too late. How or why they got themselves in this position, and why they did not correct or abandon the landing sooner, remains unknown.

Reportedly, Flight 214's captain was new to the aircraft, and had accrued fewer than 50 total hours in the 777 prior to the accident. While much is being made of this, to me it's a red herring. Pilots transition from aircraft type to aircraft type all the time, and it's not uncommon for a pilot to have a limited number of hours in whichever plane he or she has most recently qualified in. But experience in a particular model and experience overall are different things. All airline pilots are highly trained and are highly experienced before they ever set foot in a jetliner cockpit.

he should have seen his Glide Slope (Glide Path) was off. should of had a cockpit warning of GS being too low?
did he realize past the point of no return to power up and go around?

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/transport/2013/07/asiana_airlines_crash_stop_blaming_sfo_s_runways_and_korea_s_pilots_for.html



Shutter is correct. According to some news stories, the new Captain had 10,000 hours of flying time in modern airliners. And this was probably just an incremental upgrade, not something as drastic as going from a DC-3 to a B-777.

In addition, news stories stated that the co-pilot had 3000 hours in the B-777. There was a Supervisory Training Captain on board and he may or may not have been acting as the co-pilot on the flight. Further, there probably was at least a third pilot on board due to the 10.5 hour length of the flight from Seoul.

Other news stories indicate that the ILS system for that particular runway was inactive. Meaning that the electronic glideslope was not in use. Nevertheless, there was undoubtedly glide slope information available from the visual glide slope lights.

About 20 or 30 years ago, a stretched DC-8 crashed into a park in Portland when it ran out of fuel while checking a potential landing gear problem. Both the co-pilot and flight engineer told the captain that they were almost out of fuel but he disagreed. Ironically, the captain survived but the co-pilot and flight engineer were killed in the crash.

The investigators concluded that the other two cockpit crew members had not told the captain emphatically enough that they were running out of fuel. The FAA then went through some exercises about Cockpit Resource Management. Meaning that the crew needed to act as a team instead of having a captain and two subjects. I think this accident is going to come down to something like that.

On the matter of airline pilot training, I'll bet that Boeing has provided training to at least some Asiana pilots at the Boeing facilities in Washington state and probably has helped the airline with their own pilot training program (if they have one) in Seoul.

Robert99

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Robert99 says in part:

Quote

'Other news stories indicate that the ILS system for that particular runway was inactive...'
(San Francisco)



This cannot be good. I learned that from watching Die Hard the Second Edition. You remember. Snowmobiles, wintertime, a BOAC being fooled into crashing. That was a MOVIE. In reality this system should have been functioning on all runways, IMHO...just in case.

My next comment is not a joke. If you want to lighten things up a bit, just say you'd like to hear what happened between yours truly and that NWA stew back in January 1970 on a 747 flight between Seattle and Dulles. That was a memorable event, and was brought about due to fog. It went on past the actual flight and ended up at the Roanoke Hotel. Stuff happens. You know how it is. Fortunately, a parental figure rescued me in the morning.

It's off topic, but if you want to know the sordid details, say so. Otherwise that one remains private. :)


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RobertMBlevins

Robert99 says in part:

Quote

'Other news stories indicate that the ILS system for that particular runway was inactive...'
(San Francisco)



This cannot be good.



Blevins, As I also pointed out, in all probability the pilot had glide slope information from other equipment on that runway. And the weather looked unusually good even for San Francisco in the videos of the accident.

Robert99

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Same runway approach (28), same airport (SFO). foggy though. Once they got below 300 ft they had 3/4 mile visibilty, but splashed 2.5 miles short of runway 28.

Quote

Japan Airlines Flight 2 was a flight piloted by Captain Kohei Asoh on November 22, 1968.[1] The plane was a new Douglas DC-8 named "Shiga", flying from Tokyo International Airport to San Francisco International Airport. Due to heavy fog and other factors, Asoh mistakenly landed the plane in the shallow waters of San Francisco Bay, two and a half miles short of the runway.[2][3] None of the 96 passengers or 11 crew were injured in the landing.

The passengers all evacuated the plane on lifeboats. The plane came to rest on solid ground 10 feet below the water, leaving the forward exits above the waterline. It was not severely damaged and was recovered 55 hours after the incident,[4] transported to the airport on a barge.[5] United Airlines refurbished the aircraft for service at their maintenance base at the airport, at a cost of roughly $4 million USD.[6] The aircraft was returned to JAL on March 31, 1969,[4] where it was renamed "Hidaka" and continued in service to JAL until 1983.

Japan Airlines still flies from Tokyo (Haneda) to San Francisco, today using a Boeing 777 instead of a DC-8.


Captain Asoh was a veteran pilot with roughly 10,000 hours of flight time, 1,000 of them on DC-8s. During World War II he served as a flight instructor for the Japanese military.[1] His first officer, Captain Joseph Hazen, had similar flight time, but little DC-8 experience. Captain Asoh attempted an automatic-coupled Instrument Landing System (ILS) approach, something neither of them had done before on a recorded DC-8 flight.

The cloud ceiling was 300 feet, with visibility of 3/4 of a mile, and there was little contrast between the sky and the calm waters of the bay. As a result once the plane descended below the clouds, the mistake was not recognized in time to correct it before hitting the water.

The US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) review of the incident found that:


"the probable cause of this accident was the improper application of the prescribed procedures to execute an automatic-coupled ILS approach. This deviation from the prescribed procedures was, in part, due to a lack of familiarization and infrequent operation of the installed flight director and autopilot system."

The "Asoh defense"[edit]

Asoh, when asked by the NTSB about the landing, reportedly replied, "As you Americans say, I fucked up."[1] In his 1988 book The Abilene Paradox, author Jerry B. Harvey termed this frank acceptance of blame the "Asoh defense", and the story and term have been taken up by a number of other management theorists.[7]



A friend who flew DC 8s for JAL told me that the procedure for initiating a coupled ILS approach with the DC 8 autopilot of that era was unusual in that you had to descend slightly below the glide slope, climb into it and engage the coupler. If you tried it from above, the autopilot would not hold the glide slope.

377
2018 marks half a century as a skydiver. Trained by the late Perry Stevens D-51 in 1968.

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From my retired smoke jumper friend:

Quote

Mark,
Nice to see a civil discussion, and Sheridan surfacing again.
Something you are aware of but maybe not the board in general is that ...
- Sheridan was in SE Asia during the time the 727 was being "jumped".
- Air Asia purchased 3 727's from Boeing in the mid 1960's,
N5055, N5093 and N5092.
- one would think that SAT 727 N5092 as posted by mrshutter45, post #44529, was in Saigon when Sheridan was. That photo was taken at Nha Trang in 1968.
Certainly this one was,
http://www.flickr.com/photos/aodcurator/4059675378/
- Sheridan worked for Pacific Architects and Engineers (PA&E) in Cu Chi, 1966 - 1967.
PA&E was owned by Pacific Corp, a holding company that also “owned” AA, Air Asia, SAT among others, i.e.. a CIA front.



Pretty good detective work on the 727.

377
2018 marks half a century as a skydiver. Trained by the late Perry Stevens D-51 in 1968.

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377

From my retired smoke jumper friend:

Quote

Mark,
Nice to see a civil discussion, and Sheridan surfacing again.
Something you are aware of but maybe not the board in general is that ...
- Sheridan was in SE Asia during the time the 727 was being "jumped".
- Air Asia purchased 3 727's from Boeing in the mid 1960's,
N5055, N5093 and N5092.
- one would think that SAT 727 N5092 as posted by mrshutter45, post #44529, was in Saigon when Sheridan was. That photo was taken at Nha Trang in 1968.
Certainly this one was,
http://www.flickr.com/photos/aodcurator/4059675378/
- Sheridan worked for Pacific Architects and Engineers (PA&E) in Cu Chi, 1966 - 1967.
PA&E was owned by Pacific Corp, a holding company that also “owned” AA, Air Asia, SAT among others, i.e.. a CIA front.



Pretty good detective work on the 727.

377



Pretty lofty stuff!

Could fall under the same heading as: interdimensional
beings


Why would you opt for becoming an interdimensional being
hijacker
when all you have to do is give Howard Hughes or
the New York Times a call, and sell a few interdimensional
trade secrets
? Hell the CIA would pay a fortune for these!
Easy money. Then you could BUY Tibet vs. housing your
family in a mud hut in it!

If money was all the hijacking was about.

Woo woo. Woo woo. Chuck Barris call home! The mice are lose
in the attic AGAIN! Strange sounds in the bell tower again.
Sheridan is the devil. Sheridan is the devil. The DB Cooper
Hijacking had its roots in CIA activity in South East Asia


And by 1980 inflation would reduce that paultry $200k ranson
to barely enough to finance a wedding or pay for burying the
family pet or Grandpa ... which shows terrible financial planning
on the hijacker's part!

Sheridan is the devil. Sheridan is the devil.

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georger

***From my retired smoke jumper friend:

Quote

Mark,
Nice to see a civil discussion, and Sheridan surfacing again.
Something you are aware of but maybe not the board in general is that ...
- Sheridan was in SE Asia during the time the 727 was being "jumped".
- Air Asia purchased 3 727's from Boeing in the mid 1960's,
N5055, N5093 and N5092.
- one would think that SAT 727 N5092 as posted by mrshutter45, post #44529, was in Saigon when Sheridan was. That photo was taken at Nha Trang in 1968.
Certainly this one was,
http://www.flickr.com/photos/aodcurator/4059675378/
- Sheridan worked for Pacific Architects and Engineers (PA&E) in Cu Chi, 1966 - 1967.
PA&E was owned by Pacific Corp, a holding company that also “owned” AA, Air Asia, SAT among others, i.e.. a CIA front.



Pretty good detective work on the 727.

377



Pretty lofty stuff!

Could fall under the same heading as: interdimensional
beings


Why would you opt for becoming an interdimensional being
hijacker
when all you have to do is give Howard Hughes or
the New York Times a call, and sell a few interdimensional
trade secrets
? Hell the CIA would pay a fortune for these!
Easy money. Then you could BUY Tibet vs. housing your
family in a mud hut in it!

If money was all the hijacking was about.

Woo woo. Woo woo. Chuck Barris call home! The mice are lose
in the attic AGAIN! Strange sounds in the bell tower again.
Sheridan is the devil. Sheridan is the devil. The DB Cooper
Hijacking had its roots in CIA activity in South East Asia


And by 1980 inflation would reduce that paultry $200k ranson
to barely enough to finance a wedding or pay for burying the
family pet or Grandpa ... which shows terrible financial planning
on the hijacker's part!

Sheridan is the devil. Sheridan is the devil.

that would be this pic.....

http://www.utdallas.edu/library/specialcollections/hac/cataam/Leeker/aircraft/jets.pdf
"It is surprising how aggressive people get, once they latch onto their suspect and say, 'Hey, he's our guy.' No matter what you tell them, they refuse to believe you" Agent Carr FBI

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Quote

1966 - 1967.
PA&E was owned by Pacific Corp, a holding company that also “owned” AA, Air Asia, SAT among others, i.e.. a CIA front.



Anyone remember a dumb broad telling you 2 of the Boeings were purchase by an organizations in FL and TX.

I do not even remember the details on this now - not even the yrs. This has dragged on for 17 yrs now. You guys are probably not even referencing JMWave, but I do know Duane had connections to JMWave (he pointed out the place the office used to be and spoke about the GUYS).., FL and the TX connections (you know this Georger). I stated it before and I restate it. Hell, the research on that was filed away yrs ago and I have NO idea where to even find it in all of the mess.

Yes, Georger I also know that a LOT of thing related came out of TX.
Ed Huran, John Collins, Tommy Gunn and Tony Wong! The paintings that Tony did of a compound - one designed to keep others out and not anyone in - was very significant. Looked very very much Like the picture of the Compound shown in the magazine Soldier of Fortune with the picture of the guy with a barrel between his legs. The only thing Duane left in a safe deposite box which I had NO knowledge of until after his death - That stupid magazine, but there had been more!

The magazine he showed me in the very beginning before the shop was robbed was the very same story & pictures - he showed me in the magazine in 1990. Then in 1995 after he died was a 1994 issue with the same story in it and the same pictures.

Remember the shop was robbed in early 1990 after Duane made his little trip to Omaha to retrive whatever it was he kept in the Box. He immediately went to the workshop and looked behind the door - and said "Damn they got it". He never told me what IT was. Some one wanted what he had behind that door badly enough to scale the back wall and pull the window unit out. NOTHING else in the shop was disturbed! Duane did NOT contact the police.

Stange way to commit a burgulary and some old glass was NOT the bounty he was after!

Stange the way Jo puts little messages meant only for certain individuals to understand with in the text of a post!

Georger knows what the message is hidden in the text! Oh! I forgot you might not have KNOWN their real names - you were just the pen pusher for the Front!

Strange the way YOU never react when I make these comments. I make a peep about certain other things and you go off your rocker - but when I hit the nail on the head - you never say ONE word! Everyone is gone now or almost dead - nothing left to protect other than a name and no one cares!
Copyright 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 2013, 2014, 2015 by Jo Weber

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Sheridan Peterson is or was a reasonable suspect for the Cooper hijacking for a few reasons yes, but I have seven non-technical, more or less common-sense other reasons to discount him.

1) Eye color. There are several pictures available showing Sheridan with blue eyes. Ken Christiansen has been discounted sometimes due to having 'hazel' instead of the brown reported by stewardess Flo Schaffner. It might be possible to mistake hazel for brown. They are somewhat similar, depending on the shade of hazel. However, missing blue eyes and calling them brown is a bit of a stretch. If the hijacker had blue eyes, then this would call into question any other details on the hijacker reported by the stewardesses, especially Schaffner. In other words, if they missed that, you have to wonder about the remainder of their testimony.

2) There is pretty good evidence Sheridan was actually in Tibet at the time of the hijacking. He had a child born there the year before the hijacking, and there is testimony from the female doctor there that Sheridan was in attendance for the birth.

3) The FBI has investigated him and found nothing linking him to the hijacking.

4) The way the hijacker was dressed does not support the Sheridan theory. Improper shoes, a suit, etc. This more supports either a suspect with very little jump experience, or one who had not jumped in a long time. A third possibility is that the hijacker WANTED to look like that because he wasn't planning on staying aboard the 727 after it left Seattle any longer than it took to reach a reasonable altitude to make a quick jump. Petersen was an expert skydiver and Mucklow did not report that the hijacker switched shoes or any other clothing before putting on the chute. In other words, it's hard to imagine Sheridan jumping in dress shoes and a suit, especially if he traveled thousands of miles to Portland to do the hijacking. IMHO it just doesn't fit his known chute experience.

5) In order for Sheridan to be the hijacker, he would not only have to reach the ground safely, but somehow make his way all the way back to Tibet without being detected.

6) It is possible that the hijacker died in the jump. If Sheridan was the hijacker, this would discount any possibility that the hijacker died in that jump, since Sheridan is still alive. So if you believe strongly that the hijacker died, then neither Sheridan or Ken Christiansen are your man because both were certified 'alive' after the hijacking.

7) The selection of the dummy chute: The fact that the hijacker popped the only good reserve chute available to him to use for its paracord, instead of the marked dummy chute, does not point toward an expert skydiver like Sheridan. Again, like the manner in which the hijacker dressed for such a jump, this points more to either a novice or a guy who had not jumped in a long time.

That's just my two cents take on it. Try to understand here. I'm not saying it was Kenny, I'm mostly pointing out why I don't believe it was Sheridan. He is certainly interesting, though. Even today. I sent him an offer not long ago to publish his 800+ page anti-war book for him. No answer on that yet. :)


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377

From my retired smoke jumper friend:

Quote

Mark,
Nice to see a civil discussion, and Sheridan surfacing again.
Something you are aware of but maybe not the board in general is that ...
- Sheridan was in SE Asia during the time the 727 was being "jumped".
- Air Asia purchased 3 727's from Boeing in the mid 1960's,
N5055, N5093 and N5092.
- one would think that SAT 727 N5092 as posted by mrshutter45, post #44529, was in Saigon when Sheridan was. That photo was taken at Nha Trang in 1968.
Certainly this one was,
http://www.flickr.com/photos/aodcurator/4059675378/
- Sheridan worked for Pacific Architects and Engineers (PA&E) in Cu Chi, 1966 - 1967.
PA&E was owned by Pacific Corp, a holding company that also “owned” AA, Air Asia, SAT among others, i.e.. a CIA front.



Pretty good detective work on the 727.

377



The Paper Trail that says he was in SE Asia, is not too heavy in the "evidence" arena. That is if he did have SOG type creds. I know of a few MACVSOG folks who had paperwork showing them to be at bases in other countries, as they sneaked around a different country all together, I even know of one who attended a wedding back in the NW, but winked and said, he was in Loas, had paperwork to prove it even. But He was in the wedding photos. Strange huh?

Maybe some one has Pics of the man in SE Asia during the hijacking?

Matt
An Instructors first concern is student safety.
So, start being safe, first!!!

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As to point 1, it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best.

Point 2, a year is a long period of time if the Doc said he was there at the time of the actual hijacking, you may have a point.

Point 3, they can still circle back if they find more evidence, a lot of times the best suspect is the right suspect, even if they move on to others, just to rule them out.

Point 4, Sheridan did a jump dressed just like this right? The order to take off with the stairs down supports your assertion he was planning on leaving quickly. I have seen people jump in wedding outfits, dress shoes and all, so he foot wear? That is no big deal.

Point 5, if he had SOF connections, easily done, at least back then.

Point 6, Correct.

Point 7, actually, if he is looking for paracord, he would know the dummy would be a poor choice. If he was sure it was an all "on the main" ride, he didn't have a plan for the reserve anyway. He seems to have had a risk reward plan in effect.

So far, he is the only one who has the actual training, experience, and audacity. All the rest, can't even be placed in the training (confirmed at least).

Matt
An Instructors first concern is student safety.
So, start being safe, first!!!

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matthewcline

As to point 1, it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best.

Point 2, a year is a long period of time if the Doc said he was there at the time of the actual hijacking, you may have a point.

Point 3, they can still circle back if they find more evidence, a lot of times the best suspect is the right suspect, even if they move on to others, just to rule them out.

Point 4, Sheridan did a jump dressed just like this right? The order to take off with the stairs down supports your assertion he was planning on leaving quickly. I have seen people jump in wedding outfits, dress shoes and all, so he foot wear? That is no big deal.

Point 5, if he had SOF connections, easily done, at least back then.

Point 6, Correct.

Point 7, actually, if he is looking for paracord, he would know the dummy would be a poor choice. If he was sure it was an all "on the main" ride, he didn't have a plan for the reserve anyway. He seems to have had a risk reward plan in effect.

So far, he is the only one who has the actual training, experience, and audacity. All the rest, can't even be placed in the training (confirmed at least).

Matt



Sheridan is the devil. Sheridan is the devil

it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best. it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best.

eye witness testimony is the devil.

You can lead a horse to water but you can't lead the water
to the horse.

Close the door before it closes itself.

Mulholland Drive is on Muholland Drive.

Carnap on Carnap:
http://www.ams.org/journals/bull/1938-44-03/S0002-9904-1938-06694-3/S0002-9904-1938-06694-3.pdf

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georger

***As to point 1, it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best.

Point 2, a year is a long period of time if the Doc said he was there at the time of the actual hijacking, you may have a point.

Point 3, they can still circle back if they find more evidence, a lot of times the best suspect is the right suspect, even if they move on to others, just to rule them out.

Point 4, Sheridan did a jump dressed just like this right? The order to take off with the stairs down supports your assertion he was planning on leaving quickly. I have seen people jump in wedding outfits, dress shoes and all, so he foot wear? That is no big deal.

Point 5, if he had SOF connections, easily done, at least back then.

Point 6, Correct.

Point 7, actually, if he is looking for paracord, he would know the dummy would be a poor choice. If he was sure it was an all "on the main" ride, he didn't have a plan for the reserve anyway. He seems to have had a risk reward plan in effect.

So far, he is the only one who has the actual training, experience, and audacity. All the rest, can't even be placed in the training (confirmed at least).

Matt



Sheridan is the devil. Sheridan is the devil

it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best. it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best.

eye witness testimony is the devil.

You can lead a horse to water but you can't lead the water
to the horse.

Close the door before it closes itself.

Mulholland Drive is on Muholland Drive.

Carnap on Carnap:
http://www.ams.org/journals/bull/1938-44-03/S0002-9904-1938-06694-3/S0002-9904-1938-06694-3.pdf

You said zip on the Cooper case there. It was another 'gee, look how educated and smart I am' post.

I will think of you however, every time I take a nap in my car. :S


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RobertMBlevins

******As to point 1, it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best.

Point 2, a year is a long period of time if the Doc said he was there at the time of the actual hijacking, you may have a point.

Point 3, they can still circle back if they find more evidence, a lot of times the best suspect is the right suspect, even if they move on to others, just to rule them out.

Point 4, Sheridan did a jump dressed just like this right? The order to take off with the stairs down supports your assertion he was planning on leaving quickly. I have seen people jump in wedding outfits, dress shoes and all, so he foot wear? That is no big deal.

Point 5, if he had SOF connections, easily done, at least back then.

Point 6, Correct.

Point 7, actually, if he is looking for paracord, he would know the dummy would be a poor choice. If he was sure it was an all "on the main" ride, he didn't have a plan for the reserve anyway. He seems to have had a risk reward plan in effect.

So far, he is the only one who has the actual training, experience, and audacity. All the rest, can't even be placed in the training (confirmed at least).

Matt



Sheridan is the devil. Sheridan is the devil

it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best. it has been proven over and over, eye witness testimony is flawed at best.

eye witness testimony is the devil.

You can lead a horse to water but you can't lead the water
to the horse.

Close the door before it closes itself.

Mulholland Drive is on Muholland Drive.

Carnap on Carnap:
http://www.ams.org/journals/bull/1938-44-03/S0002-9904-1938-06694-3/S0002-9904-1938-06694-3.pdf

You said zip on the Cooper case there. It was another 'gee, look how educated and smart I am' post.

I will think of you however, every time I take a nap in my car. :S
Quote



You arent worth replying to!

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