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31 minutes ago, RobertMBlevins said:

You might be right if you were talking about FBI headquarters in DC, but I can assure you things are different at the Seattle office of the FBI. Believe it or not, and even though they won't reveal his (or her) identity, a case agent IS still assigned to investigate (wade through) the Cooper stuff. Yes, they still have a case agent assigned to Cooper. They've actually told me this. And only a few months ago. 

The public IS interested. I opened the Cooper Space at Quora in November of 2018. Six weeks later we had over 700 followers. 72,000+ plus people have viewed the KC video at YouTube, and the unedited report on him, a 53-page PDF with pictures, has been downloaded TENS OF THOUSANDS of times from the main AB of Seattle website since its release, and shows no sign of slowing down. Two movie production companies have partnered up to do the first ever, dramatic feature film on the Cooper case. Shooting hasn't started yet, but they still send me $2,000 bucks every February until they do...and the newest producer to sign on board has been in 17 movies and a TV series to date, none of which ever lost any money. (I met with him in Seattle this last January) The fifty or so illustrated articles on the case I have at WordPress average 300 unique visitors a day (or so) and have been for years. I still receive an average of 12-20 emails a week asking this question or that one about the case. Our Cooper Campouts are usually a sellout. (Although it is free to attend)

No...I wouldn't say either the FBI has totally given up on the case, or the public has completely lost interest, especially in the Northwest, although the FBI has said they do have to divert resources to more important matters. But that doesn't mean they wouldn't like to solve it, especially the folks at the SEATTLE office, who are almost legendary in wanting to see it (finally) closed. 

Or...maybe it was closed for ANOTHER reason...(I know this is arrogant, yes...but it HAPPENED)...and that's because they might already know who he is anyway. And just aren't saying it officially. 

One thing I do agree with you on these points is that sometimes people can become obsessed. For example, there is so much animosity going in Cooperland that *some* folks will spend half their internet life telling lies about OTHERS involved in the case, and go to almost any ridiculous length to discredit. Others hurt the case by failing to support things that could raise public interest in the case. Your best bet on how to deal with these things is to do what you do to help promote the case, and ignore the naysayers and the liars. B|

On a side note, five people are now signed to go on the latest Cooper Campout in late June. Anyone and everyone is invited, even if we've had 'issues' before. Internet stuff is one thing. Personal gatherings are another. I can tell you this much. No one has ever complained they didn't have any fun. Six weeks to go, and I think we will be able to fill the usual fourteen slots. I had doubts because this one is in Oregon, and all of the others were held in the Olympic Mountains of Washington, mostly near the Skokomish River area above Shelton. 

 

I was not aware there is still a case agent.  I can see your point about people in the Northwest being more into this case than other parts of the country.  Thanks for the information.  Do you know if the FBI has a profile for a suspect and has that changed now that he would be an old man?  What is different about a 40 year old hijacker now that he is in his 90's?  Does he act differently now, tell stories in a nursing home, give his grandchildren large sums of money?  Would something show up in his will, or in a foot locker in the attic? 

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'I was not aware there is still a case agent.  I can see your point about people in the Northwest being more into this case than other parts of the country.  Thanks for the information.  Do you know if the FBI has a profile for a suspect and has that changed now that he would be an old man?  What is different about a 40 year old hijacker now that he is in his 90's?  Does he act differently now, tell stories in a nursing home, give his grandchildren large sums of money?  Would something show up in his will, or in a foot locker in the attic?'

There is no good way to to answer your many questions. The truth is, I just don't have the answers. If you believe the Special Agent shown below in the picture, the reason they closed the case in the first place was because they discovered Cooper's identity and knew he was dead anyway. Jarvis is an 18-year veteran of the FBI who (at the time of the WordPress article about his revelation to Troy Bentz) worked out of Behavioral Profiling at the Quantico facility. He made this revelation about a month after the announcement on the closure. This revelation by Agent Jarvis is being used in the upcoming movie on the Cooper case, and the producers plan to name both Agent Jarvis and the witnesses involved, all of whom held security clearances at the time they heard Jarvis reveal what he knew while all of them were at...of all things...a Washington Nationals baseball game. 

 

JJarvis.jpg

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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Robert, I'm having trouble with your recent posts and your blog article.

Three security clearance holders and an FBI agent go to a ballgame. One of the SC guys has read your blog and has an interest in the case. He asks the FBI guy about it, and the agent noncommittally nods affirmation to the SC guy's suspicions, apparently comfortable doing so BECAUSE these guys hold clearances. So the next thing this guy does is betray the reason he holds a clearance by emailing a WRITER and blabbing what he's found out. I can kind of follow it that far, because the guy knows you've put a lot of work into it and might like to know that you could be right. But then YOU write a blog article and post here, naming names and showing a picture.

You've written several posts expressing disdain that a rigger would yank a reporter's chain, "Almost getting him FIRED!", then you potentially risk the jobs of three clearance holders and an FBI agent, ostensibly for personal vindication.

I'm pretty sure that's not consistent.

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When Troy first contacted me about his story, he was pretty reluctant. He asked me not to make his name public. I told him I could only make that promise for a year. So...I withheld his name and a few key details for over a full year as promised. Then...I finally went public about it and notified him about the article. He did not have any objections. (The Cossey thing is different. Cossey actually LIED to a reporter, saying the Amboy chute WAS Cooper's, and then later retracted that story when the angry reporter called him a second time.) 

It all happened because of a big coincidence. Troy had read Into The Blast, the sort-of incomplete book about Kenny Christiansen, just days prior to meeting Agent Jarvis. I guess he couldn't help himself. He HAD to ask Jarvis if he knew anything about Christiansen and his possible relationship to the Cooper case. If he hadn't seen the book, I'm pretty sure this incident would not have occurred. 

At first, the whole thing was pretty dicey. He thought I wouldn't believe him, so he sends me everything but the kitchen sink. The names of his friends, where they worked, their contact info, and even some personal references from his own workplace. Everything checked out as far as AB staff could tell. The only thing he got wrong was the score of the baseball game in his email, but I wrote that off as excitement. This was followed by some phone calls we exchanged. 

Troy's wife also got very pissed off at him, calling him a 'whistleblower,' and reminding him that THEIR kids did swim team with not only OTHER FBI agents' kids, but military family kids as well...and that he could lose his job. This is part of the reason I told Bentz I would keep his name out of it for a year. I actually went longer than that. He contacted me in late August 2016, about a month after the FBI closed the case. I waited almost 18 months. 

The Troy Bentz incident is not the first time someone has risked their career with the government to reveal a secret, or come forward with the truth, which in the long run of things is better than hiding a lie. Jarvis affirmed not just once, but TWICE, that the real reason the case was closed was because the FBI had discovered KC was the guy, and he was dead anyway. If Bentz' story is true, it even makes a sort of sense. It was only 14 months prior to the case closure that we send the Seattle FBI our 53-page report on Christiansen. Could they be related, the file and the closure just a year later? I don't know. But I did wonder about it. 

To be fair, it's also possible the agent was jerking everyone's chain, or just giving his own opinion. But it doesn't really sound that way. One thing is for sure. If the movie producers DO end up actually shooting this picture, and they use the Jarvis/Bentz story...someone, somewhere, is going to have to answer for it with the truth. The WordPress article has been out for an additional year and a half now. The Seattle FBI has been told about it. Jarvis was told about it, although I can't say he read my email. We used Jarvis' picture. Minnow Films out of London shot the whole story and used Jarvis' picture and Bentz' name during their documentary shoot last fall, and that will be coming out at some point. 

No one has contacted me telling me to take down Jarvis' picture, or to retract the story. His picture in the article is from his official FBI profile. Tell you the truth, I am more or less DARING them to respond to it. It is one of the most heavily viewed of the WordPress articles on Cooper. 

 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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(edited)

FOUND IT... I had it on my computer but forgot about it..

 

The 727 emergency aft airstair placard and door. This real image matches diagrams.

The Hicks Placard is inconsistent with this 727 emergency release placard.

Hicks placard looks too large and has the rivet/screw/fastener holes. The access door has none.

 

If the placard was attached on the wall above the access door then pieces trapped under the rivet/screw/fasteners would have remained and been noticed.

The placard looked too clean to be in the woods seven years.

The emergency aft airstair release placard part number also references the 737, early 737's had side aft airstairs built in.

 

Conclusion, unlikely the Hicks placard came from NORJAK.

 

NORJAK 727 SN 18807 built 10/22/65

this image from 727 SN 18998 built 03/13/66

 

727EMERGRELDOOR.jpeg.4a994eef98ebe6e2f025b128f9595cf8.jpeg

 

placard1.jpg.48c5781d58b1c5d2667c0d78d6bed857.jpg

Edited by FLYJACK

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19 hours ago, RobertMBlevins said:

When Troy first contacted me about his story, he was pretty reluctant. He asked me not to make his name public. I told him I could only make that promise for a year. So...I withheld his name and a few key details for over a full year as promised. Then...I finally went public about it and notified him about the article. He did not have any objections. (The Cossey thing is different. Cossey actually LIED to a reporter, saying the Amboy chute WAS Cooper's, and then later retracted that story when the angry reporter called him a second time.) 

It all happened because of a big coincidence. Troy had read Into The Blast, the sort-of incomplete book about Kenny Christiansen, just days prior to meeting Agent Jarvis. I guess he couldn't help himself. He HAD to ask Jarvis if he knew anything about Christiansen and his possible relationship to the Cooper case. If he hadn't seen the book, I'm pretty sure this incident would not have occurred. 

At first, the whole thing was pretty dicey. He thought I wouldn't believe him, so he sends me everything but the kitchen sink. The names of his friends, where they worked, their contact info, and even some personal references from his own workplace. Everything checked out as far as AB staff could tell. The only thing he got wrong was the score of the baseball game in his email, but I wrote that off as excitement. This was followed by some phone calls we exchanged. 

Troy's wife also got very pissed off at him, calling him a 'whistleblower,' and reminding him that THEIR kids did swim team with not only OTHER FBI agents' kids, but military family kids as well...and that he could lose his job. This is part of the reason I told Bentz I would keep his name out of it for a year. I actually went longer than that. He contacted me in late August 2016, about a month after the FBI closed the case. I waited almost 18 months. 

The Troy Bentz incident is not the first time someone has risked their career with the government to reveal a secret, or come forward with the truth, which in the long run of things is better than hiding a lie. Jarvis affirmed not just once, but TWICE, that the real reason the case was closed was because the FBI had discovered KC was the guy, and he was dead anyway. If Bentz' story is true, it even makes a sort of sense. It was only 14 months prior to the case closure that we send the Seattle FBI our 53-page report on Christiansen. Could they be related, the file and the closure just a year later? I don't know. But I did wonder about it. 

To be fair, it's also possible the agent was jerking everyone's chain, or just giving his own opinion. But it doesn't really sound that way. One thing is for sure. If the movie producers DO end up actually shooting this picture, and they use the Jarvis/Bentz story...someone, somewhere, is going to have to answer for it with the truth. The WordPress article has been out for an additional year and a half now. The Seattle FBI has been told about it. Jarvis was told about it, although I can't say he read my email. We used Jarvis' picture. Minnow Films out of London shot the whole story and used Jarvis' picture and Bentz' name during their documentary shoot last fall, and that will be coming out at some point. 

No one has contacted me telling me to take down Jarvis' picture, or to retract the story. His picture in the article is from his official FBI profile. Tell you the truth, I am more or less DARING them to respond to it. It is one of the most heavily viewed of the WordPress articles on Cooper. 

 

The Kenny Christanson story is interesting, but there are a number of suspects who supposedly have the FBI attached to them.  The Rackstraw team says they have FBI backing them up, so does the Reca group, the Sheridan Peterson guy says he spoke to a FBI agent who thinks Peterson could be Cooper. 

Why could you only promise to keep Troy's name secret for a year?  I think it would be great for you to do a movie, it would help you get people interested in the case.  Regardless of how interested some people are, I just don't see the nationwide interest in this case.  Maybe you can change that.  When I search for D.B. Cooper, most of what I find is about Robert Rackstraw.

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8 hours ago, FLYJACK said:

FOUND IT... I had it on my computer but forgot about it..

 

The 727 emergency aft airstair placard and door. This real image matches diagrams.

The Hicks Placard is inconsistent with this 727 emergency release placard.

Hicks placard looks too large and has the rivet/screw/fastener holes. The access door has none.

 

If the placard was attached on the wall above the access door then pieces trapped under the rivet/screw/fasteners would have remained and been noticed.

The placard looked too clean to be in the woods seven years.

The emergency aft airstair release placard part number also references the 737, early 737's had side aft airstairs built in.

 

Conclusion, unlikely the Hicks placard came from NORJAK.

 

NORJAK 727 SN 18807 built 10/22/65

this image from 727 SN 18998 built 03/13/66

 

727EMERGRELDOOR.jpeg.4a994eef98ebe6e2f025b128f9595cf8.jpeg

 

placard1.jpg.48c5781d58b1c5d2667c0d78d6bed857.jpg

How could there possibly be a part from a 727 right where the D.B. Cooper plane flew over?  Could it have been planted?

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(edited)

JJG78 says in part: 

Quote

 

'The Kenny Christanson story is interesting, but there are a number of suspects who supposedly have the FBI attached to them.  The Rackstraw team says they have FBI backing them up, so does the Reca group, the Sheridan Peterson guy says he spoke to a FBI agent who thinks Peterson could be Cooper. 

Why could you only promise to keep Troy's name secret for a year?  I think it would be great for you to do a movie, it would help you get people interested in the case.  Regardless of how interested some people are, I just don't see the nationwide interest in this case.  Maybe you can change that.  When I search for D.B. Cooper, most of what I find is about Robert Rackstraw...'

First, I don't think the FBI is backing anybody up, including our efforts at AB of Seattle to solve the case. Prior to the Marla Cooper fiasco, the Seattle FBI office was pretty upfront and forthcoming with almost anyone who contacted them about the Cooper case. They would freely answer questions and take phone calls. Then Marla came along and everything changed. The FBI went out on a limb, calling her uncle a good suspect, and then frankly were made fools of. After that, they started going with the official line on most information requests, etc. However, even to this day many of the folks who hang around Cooperland still love her even though she caused some damage to the efforts of other Cooper investigators. They found out none of the members of her family would back her story, even though they were there with the uncle and Marla over the time of the hijacking and supposedly witnessed the things Marla said occurred. She also forgot about the Tina Bar money and kept changing her story. Long ago and far away, I suppose. 

The Rackstraw people got a lot of publicity due to their TV show D.B. Cooper - Case Closed? but it was poorly done and a complete zero when it finally came to cable. They got an interview with Tina Mucklow and instead of showing her a group of photos with most of the known suspects included, they showed her one with five unknown people alongside Robert Rackstraw. Then, they showed her a video of Rackstraw speaking out front of a courthouse a couple of years after the hijacking. Mucklow totally blew off Rackstraw as Cooper, saying it wasn't him she saw on the plane. Colbert and the Rackstraw people got really pissed off and hinted that maybe Mucklow was getting old or something. They also approached Adventure Books staff and asked for everything we had on Christiansen, which we provided. They ignored all of it. Their BEST chance to actually solve the case, or at least eliminate ALL the popular suspects would have been to show Mucklow the main suspects and let her go public once and for all. They were afraid to do that, because they had a book coming out the same week as the TV show was due to air, so they took the chicken's way out and got burned when Mucklow told them Rackstraw was a negative. The production company that made the show was later raided by the FBI when their own accountant tried blackmailing them. It was a disaster from start to end.

Later, I got a confirmation from Billy Jensen, the New York reporter, the young guy on the Colbert team who appeared on the show. He said he wanted nothing to do with Colbert, Rackstraw, or the show any longer, and had voiced his doubts privately to them that Rackstraw was the hijacker. However, Colbert did have the heavy media behind him, and that's probably why he still shows up heavily in Cooper searches. Later, I did cartoons on both the Rackstraw production, as well as Marla. The LMNO Productions company cartoon pokes fun at the fact that ex-FBI agents were involved in the show, and that REAL FBI agents showed up at LMNO on a raid after the Cooper program aired. The Marla cartoon is about certain Facebook posts Marla made after she contacted the FBI and pointed the finger at her uncle. 

Cooperland...what can you do? Sometimes it gets weird. B|

 

Marla1.jpg

whichfbi.jpg

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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On 5/11/2019 at 11:58 PM, dudeman17 said:

Robert, I'm having trouble with your recent posts and your blog article.

Three security clearance holders and an FBI agent go to a ballgame. One of the SC guys has read your blog and has an interest in the case. He asks the FBI guy about it, and the agent noncommittally nods affirmation to the SC guy's suspicions, apparently comfortable doing so BECAUSE these guys hold clearances. So the next thing this guy does is betray the reason he holds a clearance by emailing a WRITER and blabbing what he's found out. I can kind of follow it that far, because the guy knows you've put a lot of work into it and might like to know that you could be right. But then YOU write a blog article and post here, naming names and showing a picture.

You've written several posts expressing disdain that a rigger would yank a reporter's chain, "Almost getting him FIRED!", then you potentially risk the jobs of three clearance holders and an FBI agent, ostensibly for personal vindication.

I'm pretty sure that's not consistent.

Totally agree with above.

Here are some points that need to be considered regarding this "revelation":

1. Agent Jarvis was not involved in the DB Cooper investigation, period. So why would he have any inside info on the case? Did the FBI send a memo to all of their employees letting them know they solved the case, but was just going to drop it since the perpetrator was dead? Highly doubtful. So then, how did Jarvis get this info?

2. According to Blevins own article, Jarvis never mentioned Kenny Christiansen by name. He only nodded his head when his name was mentioned.

3. Why would the FBI go public with LD Cooper, a dead suspect who they called their "most promising suspect", but then decide that it wasn't worth naming Christiansen as Cooper, once they "solved" the case.

4. Jarvis had no secret intel or no secret knowledge on the case. He knew what the public knew and what Ayn Dietrich-Williams said in an email to Bruce Williams: Prior to closing the case, the FBI spent the previous 5 years looking into LD Cooper, a dead guy that they thought was DB Cooper. When they were unable to prove LD was in fact DB, the case was closed.

So, with the above in mind, isn't is possible (likely even) that Jarvis, not being overly familiar with case, knew that there was a dead guy that the FBI thought was Cooper, and they closed the case after completing their investigation on the guy. He probably didn't remember the guys name, again because he doesn't work on the case and only has a passing knowledge of the case and some of the details. It comes up in conversation and he says, "Yeah, the guys dead so they just closed it". Someone says, "You mean it was Christiansen". he says "yeah, that guy". Same reaction he would've had if they had said Cooper, or Weber, or McCoy. Why? Because it was small talk between friends and he really doesn't know anything special or sensitive regarding the case.

 

Bottom Line: If the case was solved, the FBI would absolutely make it known. 

Edited by ParrotheadVol

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13 hours ago, JJG78 said:

How could there possibly be a part from a 727 right where the D.B. Cooper plane flew over?  Could it have been planted?

Simple, the Cowlitz sheriff was convinced the placard came from Cooper but the FBI wasn't and they had to walk it back..

This article plus the images/info I found convince me that it is very unlikely the placard came from Cooper.  This is the crazy nature of this Cooper case, what at first seems to be a fact just isn't.

 

Eugene Register-Guard Jan 19,1979

Decal’s link to hijacker discounted

"SEATTLE (AP) - a heavy plastic placard found in a heavily forested area of southwest Washington could have dropped off any passing Boeing 727, not necessarily the plane skyjacked by the legendary D.B.Cooper, officials acknowledge.

The FBI said Thursday the placard could have dropped from a plane during a re-enactment of the incident six weeks after the 1971 hijacking.

Cowlitz County Sheriff Les Nelson said the placard was of the type posted next to the rear exits of 727’s and added, “It’s one in a million that any other plane could have lost it in the area in which D.B. Cooper jumped.”

The FBI, however, said the placard, posted on the outside of the jetliner, could have dropped off almost any 727 that flew over southwest Washington during the past eight years.

Ray Mathis, FBI spokesman in Seattle, said the hijacked plane was used in a simulation of the hijacking, and, “we noticed the decal was missing after that, but not before.”

Those placards have been known to fall off on the runway,” added a Boeing spokesman.

It was disclosed Wednesday that an elk hunter found the notice last November about 12 miles east of Kelso.The discovery was kept quiet while FBI and Cowlitz County sheriff’s detectives tried to verify the placard’s origin.

A person identifying himself as D.B. Cooper hijacked a Northwest Orient plane Thanksgiving eve on a flight between Portland and Seattle. He received $200,000 and jumped from the plane. Authorities have seen neither Cooper nor the money since."

 

placardquestioned.jpeg.351ea790335acdf1685ff9fb85484125.jpeg

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5 hours ago, FLYJACK said:

Simple, the Cowlitz sheriff was convinced the placard came from Cooper but the FBI wasn't and they had to walk it back..

This article plus the images/info I found convince me that it is very unlikely the placard came from Cooper.  This is the crazy nature of this Cooper case, what at first seems to be a fact just isn't.

 

Eugene Register-Guard Jan 19,1979

Decal’s link to hijacker discounted

"SEATTLE (AP) - a heavy plastic placard found in a heavily forested area of southwest Washington could have dropped off any passing Boeing 727, not necessarily the plane skyjacked by the legendary D.B.Cooper, officials acknowledge.

The FBI said Thursday the placard could have dropped from a plane during a re-enactment of the incident six weeks after the 1971 hijacking.

Cowlitz County Sheriff Les Nelson said the placard was of the type posted next to the rear exits of 727’s and added, “It’s one in a million that any other plane could have lost it in the area in which D.B. Cooper jumped.”

The FBI, however, said the placard, posted on the outside of the jetliner, could have dropped off almost any 727 that flew over southwest Washington during the past eight years.

Ray Mathis, FBI spokesman in Seattle, said the hijacked plane was used in a simulation of the hijacking, and, “we noticed the decal was missing after that, but not before.”

Those placards have been known to fall off on the runway,” added a Boeing spokesman.

It was disclosed Wednesday that an elk hunter found the notice last November about 12 miles east of Kelso.The discovery was kept quiet while FBI and Cowlitz County sheriff’s detectives tried to verify the placard’s origin.

A person identifying himself as D.B. Cooper hijacked a Northwest Orient plane Thanksgiving eve on a flight between Portland and Seattle. He received $200,000 and jumped from the plane. Authorities have seen neither Cooper nor the money since."

 

placardquestioned.jpeg.351ea790335acdf1685ff9fb85484125.jpeg

Excellent find, Flyjack. Now they say (whoever 'they' is) the placard was mounted on the OUTSIDE of the jet? If so, this only confirms I made the right decision by canceling my proposed search of the placard area. "These placards have been known to fall off on the runway," added a Boeing spokesperson. Oh, brother. Here's another quote, from Shakespeare:

Quote

"Much ado about nothing."

Oregon, here I come. I need a vacation, that's for sure. 

Quote

 

Episode 12 of The Cooper Vortex is up now. DB Cooper Survived the Jump with Marty Andrade.

https://pod.link/1439712498

Let me know what you guys think!

 

I think it's good. That's what I think.

All 12 episodes of the Cooper Vortex are coming along for this trip, via flash drive and the big stereo. Other items include the movie with Treat Williams, and the two minute promo reel on the (hopefully) upcoming movie on Cooper. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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4 hours ago, The Cooper Vortex said:

Episode 12 of The Cooper Vortex is up now. DB Cooper Survived the Jump with Marty Andrade.

https://pod.link/1439712498

Let me know what you guys think!

This is an outstanding podcast with Marty. I think it's the best one so far. I encourage all to check it out.

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10 minutes ago, EJU said:
5 hours ago, The Cooper Vortex said:

Episode 12 of The Cooper Vortex is up now. DB Cooper Survived the Jump with Marty Andrade.

https://pod.link/1439712498

Let me know what you guys think!

This is an outstanding podcast with Marty. I think it's the best one so far. I encourage all to check it out.

I dunno. I thought the one about Christiansen was pretty good. (*insert evil laugh here*)

Actually, they've all been pretty good so far. I have all of them except this latest one downloaded onto a flash drive. I will add it later today. I envision them as more entertaining being blasted out from big speakers in the middle of nowhere. There are enough of them available now to do a modest marathon at high volume. B|

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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On 5/13/2019 at 9:48 AM, ParrotheadVol said:

Bottom Line: If the case was solved, the FBI would absolutely make it known. 

You all assume Cooper was a folk hero and this was a one off for him.  The truth is he was a career criminal and serial killer.  There are other high profile cases still open that he is responsible for.  They also may not disclose who he was so others do not copycat.

cooper_dr_zodiac.jpg

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(edited)

I did read Parrothead Vol's entire analysis of the Troy Bentz incident. PV makes a lot of assumptions, including what an FBI agent would do, or would say...or what the FBI itself would do in certain situations. A LOT of assumptions. And that's what they are. Assumptions. 

I could have embellished Troy's story a bit. I didn't. I published his first email just as it arrived in my box. I told his story just as it happened. I have spoken to him extensively on the phone in this matter. I gave Agent Jarvis' name and published his official FBI photograph. I don't hold anything back, which means anyone who chooses to do so could attempt to verify Bentz' story. At some point, I think someone WILL, especially if this situation ends up in a movie. Someone is going to check it out.

I don't make any particular conclusions about it, although I point out that Agent John Jarvis worked in Behavioral Profiling in Quantico, and that could make him privy to certain information. You have to wonder why the FBI decided to suddenly close the case in July 2016 and announce they were sending all the evidence to the Smithsonian. Why would they do that? Ever heard of them doing this for any other unsolved case? They do have OTHER unsolved cases, and they haven't closed those, and certainly haven't divested themselves of the evidence to boot. Why did they pick Cooper to do this? Then they say that if new evidence comes forward, they will still listen. It's weird. It doesn't make a lot of sense. And the month after all this happens is when Troy Bentz comes forward with his story. Coincidence? Maybe. Or maybe both Bentz and Agent Jarvis are telling the truth. 

The Troy Bentz story is what it is. It exists. It is there. Names, dates, all provided. I don't make any more (or any less) out of it than what it is. The movie producers in LA, with whom I have a confidentiality agreement (still) going, are heavily in favor of using Bentz' story in any movie about Cooper, and were convinced the evidence is strong enough to put it on film. If you don't believe the story, then this is the best way to find out the truth, because sooner or later someone with a bit more journalistic pull (like say a reporter from the New York Times, for example) is going to get to the truth of the matter. Cooper investigators should WANT this to happen, not go into denial or try to explain it away without interviewing the principle folks involved. 

Wouldn't YOU like to know the truth? I sure would. It's been 18 months since I went public on the Bentz/Jarvis story and that article just sits out there like a big gorilla, waiting for someone to verify its accuracy. And sooner or later...someone WILL. 

Updates on the Cooper Campout to the area SE of Eugene, June 21-24:  

  • We're going to marathon the Cooper Vortex episodes through the big portable stereo.
  • Greg the Techie Guy is coming and bringing his Toyota Tundra. We (Nissan owners) decided not to hold that against him. 
  • I don't think we will fill all 14 slots this time, but that's mainly because all the other Cooper Campouts were held in the Olympics of WA state, and Eugene is a little too far to travel for this one. Some of our 'regulars' said they couldn't make it that far. No problem. It's a five hour drive from the Puget Sound area. 
  • We contacted some relevant people in the Portland area and invited them along. 
  • So far looks like only six people, and that includes Greg and myself, are coming. But there is still about five weeks to go and we'll probably pick up a few more. 
  • We usually do a small gift for everyone who goes to these campouts. This time it is a tactical flashlight with the Cree bulb and a big bag of jerky from Costco. 
  • Unlike the previous campouts, we will do video and stills that will be made public. On the others, we didn't publish anything to Facebook or the like. (Some people didn't want their pictures posted publicly) But since members of the Infamous Nissan website are involved, that's where the media will end up later. 
  • If you are reading this now and kicking around the idea of attending, please don't wait until the last minute to do so. We're meeting at a central spot and caravan-ing to the camp location. 

Below: Blast From the Past. From the very first Cooper Campout: We used the small Envizen TV/DVD player unit to watch movies and do video games. After that, we went to the 32 inch TV. Now we use a ten foot wide screen and a media projector. The good old days of simplicity replaced by ridiculous creature comforts, I'll admit. B|

VideoInDaWoods.jpg

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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(edited)
54 minutes ago, ParrotheadVol said:

Yes, I made some assumptions. You've made quite a few of them over the years as well. I don't think I need to list them here.

Name just ONE person who hasn't 'made assumptions' in the case. Everyone has at one time or another. What is important is that when you DO find the truth on matters, that you present those as accurately as you can, and without bringing personalities into the whole thing. 

There have been efforts over the years to try and shut out some voices in the Cooper case. Sometimes this was even partially successful. That is no longer the case, whether some people like it or not.

At Dropzone, everyone is on a level playing field, and ALL voices are heard. To a very few people out there in Cooperland, this worries them to a degree because they no longer have total control over the general discussions on the Cooper case. And there is a moral to this as well. The more you try to squash other peoples' voices, the more the public wonders why you would bother with that, and the more the illusion of 'control' slips away from you. 

EDIT: There is another small point I would like to mention. Infighting and negativity between the major folks, the big fans of the Cooper case, is counter-productive. Preaching to the choir is useless. What the public wants to see (in my humble opinion only) is mutual support and cooperation regarding any and all publicly-oriented events that have to do with the Cooper case. 

Right now, there is a lack of that going, and down the road it's going to hurt anyone trying to organize major events with the Cooper name attached. A convention, for example. Or videos uploaded to YouTube. I have invited Eric to join as a contributor (to give another example) at the Quora Space on Cooper. Any video he posts there would then go out automatically to over 700 followers. This is why Darren from the Vortex podcast joined, and maybe why he gets so many downloads on his episodes. I can't say for sure, but he's getting a lot more downloads than Eric does views to his videos. The lesson here is simple. I believe in supporting people and events in the Cooper case, as long as they deal straight with others and don't bring personal attacks into the mix. I have not seen Eric or Darren engage in any of that. I believe both of them have a real desire to help solve the case, and to promote events related to the case. 

if it ends up that the public is no longer interested, then you are left just preaching to the same people who know all the stories anyway. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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4 hours ago, ParrotheadVol said:

I can recall one time in particular when an attempt was made to, "shut out some voices in the Cooper case". Last November I think it was.

With that, I will now bow out of this discussion.

Nothing like trying to drop an ugly stick into the discussion, saying nothing about it, and then 'bowing out'. You have said exactly nothing, although I know the incident you are referring to. That was the fault of certain people who were slated to speak at last year's convention, who thought it was okay to spend their time prior to that convention saying the most ugly things about one particular suspect on the internet. And some of the places where they did that, I was not allowed to defend against those allegations. Allegations= Things you would not want said about you or anyone you know.

I reacted to all that by contacting the venue where the convention was due to be held and asking them to send a reminder to the organizers that if these same people were planning to bring up these false allegations at the convention itself...with the public...that they should NOT do this, since these allegations were unproven and a key witness put the kabosh to them as well. The venue saw it our way and canceled. We did not ask them to cancel, nor did we expect it. However, once they did we decided to leave the issue alone. We figured the people involved got the hint. You want to talk about dirty tricks in Cooperland that go nowhere, hurt efforts with the public interest in the case, future Cooper events? That was a classic example. 

Edited by RobertMBlevins

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What about DNA? Can't they find DB Cooper that way?  One more reason to show that the FBI really does not care about the case.  Some YouTube videos and podcasts aren't going to be enough to get this case in the public eye again.

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2 hours ago, JJG78 said:

What about DNA? Can't they find DB Cooper that way?  One more reason to show that the FBI really does not care about the case.  Some YouTube videos and podcasts aren't going to be enough to get this case in the public eye again.

The FBI has a DNA sample taken from the tie left behind by the hijacker. It is only a PARTIAL sample. And I am absolutely not an expert on DNA. I probably know as much as the average person and that's it. I made a couple of inquiries with the Seattle office of the FBI concerning this 'partial sample'. Agent Fred Gutt told me that the current sample held by the FBI cannot positively identify a suspect. He went on to say that if a suspect's full DNA profile is done (more expensive than your over-the-counter DNA test) it can ELIMINATE them from contention, but cannot positively match that person as being the hijacker. 

This is where the FBI's loss of the Raleigh cigarette butts comes into play. Had they not misplaced them, a full DNA profile could have been taken from them. Then...if you had a suspect's DNA, it would be an easy matter to see if that suspect was a match to the DNA from the butts. 

But...they lost them. Gutt has also said that the FBI would no longer pay for additional DNA profiling on suspects submitted for their attention, simply because the FBI had no interest in spending more money on the Cooper case. 

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