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DB Cooper

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Boomshki,,,

Cooper's tie was "Dacron Polyester".. many of the found tie particles match those used in the manufacturing process for Dacron.. in other words, many of those rare particles were already on the tie when new. The rare tie particle chase is a bit of a red herring.

 

Tom Kaye needs to test another Pennys 1965 era "Dacron Polyester" clipon tie.. to determine which particles may have come from the manufacturing process.

 

FBI file 26 p 8570

Black Snap-On Tie and Tie Tack

An examination of the tie by the writers revealed noticeable amounts of dust in the inner knot area. In addition to the markings "3 Penneys”, two other labels were found as follows: "Snapper Pat. 2972750. It's a snap to snap on"; and "100% Dacron Polyester Washable RN 16484". From writers' experience in Theft From Interstate Shipment cases Penneys merchandise, it is known that the RN number is a manufacturer's code. Penneys headquarters will be able to determine where the was manufactured, when imported and which stores this tie. 

----

 

https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/55/b8/56/ea754678a56895/US2984576.pdf

Zirconia and hafnia sols or finely divided powders can be used as binding agents in a wide variety of applications. These can range from refractories in which the zirconia or hafnia serve to bind components together to plastic material in which they serve a similar function. Likewise, they can be used to bind organic acids or other organic compounds such as dyes

 

It is especialy effective with synthetic polyacrylonitrile fibers such as
"Orlon,” 'Dacron’ polyester, and nylon polyamide types. 

 

"Generally zirconia or hafnia particles will be used with refractory metal oxides and sulfides, refractory interstitial type compounds of carbon and nitrogen intermetallics of rare earths and refractory metals.

Refractory compositions including refractory metal oxides can be made with such oxides as aluminum oxide, barium oxide, beryllium oxide, calcium oxide, cerium oxide, chromic oxide, cobaltus oxide, gallium oxide, lanthanum oxide, magnesium oxide, maganese oxide MnO, maganous oxide, neodymium oxide, nickel oxide, silica niobium oxide, strontium oxide, tantalum oxide, thorium oxide, titanium dioxide and titanium suboxides such as TiO, stannic oxide, tungstic oxide, uranium dioxide, vanadium oxides, VO, VO2, VO2VO3, yttrium oxide, zinc oxide, and cadmium oxide. Of the above, zirconia and hafnia will ordinarily be used most desirably with alumina. silica, ceria, titania, magnesia, thoria and calcia."

 

 

 

 

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On 4/20/2019 at 1:04 AM, dudeman17 said:

Dropzone.com is a skydiving website. I'm a skydiver. I'm going to tell a story about skydivers. This happened some years ago.

For background, skydivers, like many adventure sports enthusiasts, like to video stuff. These days, those lightweight tiny Go-Pros are everywhere. But before they came about, back when those handheld camcorders were the thing, if a skydiver wanted to video stuff they had to set up a helmet with a camcorder mounted on the top. There's also a piece of skydiving gear that is known as a Dytter. It's a little thing about the size of a matchbook that you'd also mount on your helmet, and what it does is, you set it for a certain altitude and on the way down it beeps in your ear. You wouldn't want to rely on it for your life, but it's a handy little back-up reminder. Any skydiver would instantly recognize one, pretty much nobody else would.

Anyways, where I was living, there was a ski hill not far away. Small place, not too popular, but it had some good steep runs and I could be there in an hour. So one day, like many, I went there by myself to get some runs in. After one particular run, I pull up to the chairlift line and there were these four guys ahead of me, and one of them had a helmet cam on. Didn't recognize any of them, but I says, 'Gee, that's cool, got a camera there to film your friends skiing...' They kinda half-heartedly turned around, 'Yeah, sure..' turned back amongst themselves. 'But', I continue, 'just where on the hill does that Dytter go off?' They all quickly turned around, looked at me with much more interest. 'What? You know what a Dytter is? You jump?'...

Turns out they were jumpers from a different dropzone I hadn't been to, but we ended up skiing together for the day. I visited them at their dz, we all became friends. A couple years later, one of them went in. I was on his ash dive, and I cried...

 

Camaraderie over a shared interest. It's fuckin' cool. You guys should try it.

 

Anyway, I'm going to bed. Goin' jumpin' tomorrow...

Cool story Dudeman, but very sad to hear that one of your ski slope skydive buddies went in.

Camcorders and Dytters? When I started it was heavy WW2 surplus gun movie cameras that shot 16 mm film, not tape. Most of the gun cams required 24 volts DC to run, necessitating really heavy battery packs. There were a few 12 volt ones but they were very scarce and pricey. Developing 16 mm film was expensive, Every frame had to count. You didn't just leave it on and edit later. 

Steve Snyder made the first commercially successful audible altitude alert called the PARALERT. It had inadequate volume, I rarely heard mine amidst the freight train roar of freefall. 

Good to see fellow skydivers posting. We seem to bitch a little less than regular folks.

377

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These suggest Cooper was right handed.. he did drink and smoke while seated so he likely switched hands at times.  Maybe that is why Tina lit his smokes for him... one free hand usually the left one.

 

"when he was moving toward the aft lavatory.  He was carrying the attache case on its side in his left hand with his right hand in the case."

"right hand inside the briefcase at all times"

 

 

cooperlavrighthandbomb.jpeg.5c1ec81aec974ca7abf1fe3d6e77055a.jpeg

cooprighthandbrief.jpeg.3fac857f31a872af5d9edc97d0ae3aea.jpeg

 

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Again, the case resting in the seat to the right of DBC necessitates him using his right hand.

DBC walking to the lavatory holding the case in his left hand may be suggestive of favoring his right hand, but this is entirely predicated upon the entire motion of him sliding out of his seat, standing and moving toward the back. In other words, if the right hand was in the case at the beginning of this procedure, it is likely to stay in the case thereby not indicating anything other than that which was practical.

The case in a completely neutral position sitting upon his lap invites his natural tendencies to display themselves. The fact that the left hand was observed by Bill Mitchell as discussed in his contemporaneous 302 is notable.

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6 minutes ago, EJU said:

Again, the case resting in the seat to the right of DBC necessitates him using his right hand.

DBC walking to the lavatory holding the case in his left hand may be suggestive of favoring his right hand, but this is entirely predicated upon the entire motion of him sliding out of his seat, standing and moving toward the back. In other words, if the right hand was in the case at the beginning of this procedure, it is likely to stay in the case thereby not indicating anything other than that which was practical.

The case in a completely neutral position sitting upon his lap invites his natural tendencies to display themselves. The fact that the left hand was observed by Bill Mitchell as discussed in his contemporaneous 302 is notable.

Cooper was drinking, he put the case on his lap to switch to his left and drink with his right hand. MITCHELL,, "THE SUBJECT WAS NOT NOTICED UNTIL HE SPILLED A DRINK"

If Cooper was left handed he would have placed the case on his left side. Using the fact that case was placed on the right side to negate a right handedness is poor logic. He likely placed it on his right and chose his seat to facilitate his use of his more dexterous right hand. 

 

Cooper was more than likely right handed.

 

 

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11 minutes ago, FLYJACK said:

Cooper was drinking, he put the case on his lap to switch to his left and drink with his right hand. MITCHELL,, "THE SUBJECT WAS NOT NOTICED UNTIL HE SPILLED A DRINK"

If Cooper was left handed he would have placed the case on his left side. Using the fact that case was placed on the right side to negate a right handedness is poor logic. He likely placed it on his right and chose his seat to facilitate his use of his more dexterous right hand. 

 

Cooper was more than likely right handed.

 

 

I absolutely disagree. Cooper would not have the case sitting in the chair on the aisle for two primary reasons.

First, Flo and Tina used the seat.

Second, the case is susceptible to being neutralized by someone in the aisle.

The smart option for Cooper was the window seat to his right. 

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8 minutes ago, EJU said:

I absolutely disagree. Cooper would not have the case sitting in the chair on the aisle for two primary reasons.

First, Flo and Tina used the seat.

Second, the case is susceptible to being neutralized by someone in the aisle.

The smart option for Cooper was the window seat to his right. 

nonsense, he could have picked a different seat like on the other side of the isle.

He chose that seat to have the case on his right side, he could have chosen a seat to have his left hand in the case.

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I keep seeing references to a 28 ft Conical.  E.g.: "Sounds like to me that Cooper jumped with the 'military back pack parachute' the 28 foot conical, belonging to Hayden."

There was no 28 ft Conical, only a 26 ft Conical. The 28 ft canopy was a C9 mil surplus round.  

377

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Ha, I remember Paralerts. I've never worn an audible, could never fathom the idea that you should need one. (Though I have always thought that they should design one with a snooze button.) The best altimeter on the planet is... the planet. That's the one that will never break down and lie to you. I jumped for years without any altimeter, put one back on when I got instructor ratings. I use an altimaster analog, they're easy to see, never need batteries, and they're easy to adjust - when I'm doing AFF I always sync mine with the student's at their pull altitude on the way up.

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