0
howardwhite

Camera people

Recommended Posts

This photo, scanned from Howard Gregory's "The Falcon's Disciples," shows three well-known camera dudes and a legendary pilot etc.
Art Armstrong is flying his C-185, with strut-mounted Nikon.
In the door is Chip Maury, with a 16mm Bell and Howell movie camera, helmet mounted Nikon, and hand-held 4x5 K-20.
Below him is Luis Melendez, with Nikon on helmet and holding a 4x5 Speed Graphic. Lyle Cameron is on the step, with a 16mm KB3A movie camera and KB10 still camera.

(Chip is now retired from a long career as a Navy and civilian photographer and photojournalism professor. I hope to see him this summer.)

HW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow! That's an early morning jolt!

The people, the airplane, the canal, ...

The stories, the memories, ...

Thank you, Howard.

I haven't seen Chip Maury since the
nationals in Plattsburgh in 1970.

Please say hello for me.

Skr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Since the thread title is "Camera People," wonder how many people knew Mike Sisemore in Oklahoma who used to jump one of the ABC Wide World of Sports cameras on his helmet (circa late 70's - early 80's)... Mike had to finally give up skydiving around 1983 as the camera had blown his neck and knees out. About every two years, Mike has an "Old Skydivers" reunion at his place on the lake that we jump into
Nobody has time to listen; because they're desperately chasing the need of being heard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Love old photo threads . . . and I hope this isn’t too much of a hijack.

Here's a few that ran in the now defunct Los Angeles Times.

Wiggins: This shows Mary Wiggins about to make her 13th jump in 1931. The paper made a big deal about jump #13 being the, "jinx jump."

Lobe: Also from 1931 this shows gear manufacturers were never shy about plastering their name all over our gear. (I do like the shoes though . . .)

Haystack: This one is from 1977 and shows Evel Knievel and his plan to exit an airplane and land in a haystack without using a parachute. I suppose it's a good thing for Jeb Corliss that Evel never followed through . . .

NickD :)BASE 194

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ask and you shall receive a double-header, from the same wonderful Howard Gregory book.

(I was at a DZ yesterday rooting through an old storage shed and found a pristine copy of the original El Cap movie that Carl showed at a USPA BOD meeting ages ago. Now I just have to find a projector.)

Pictures are from El Cap.

HW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Ask and you shall receive a double-header, from the same wonderful Howard Gregory book.

(I was at a DZ yesterday rooting through an old storage shed and found a pristine copy of the original El Cap movie that Carl showed at a USPA BOD meeting ages ago. Now I just have to find a projector.)

Pictures are from El Cap.


Thanks Howard. It's amazing when what the camera man does dwarfs what his subject is doing...

HW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Howard,

Thank you for the pictures, I'm copying and sending them around.

I started jumping in Darbydale Ohio in August 1969 with the Columbus Skydivers. They were still pissed off about the name change from PCA to USPA and some thought the movie "Gypsy Moths" was state of the art Skydiving. One of the jumpers (John Simpkins) had a collection of Skydiver magazines and Parachutist from day one, I borrowed them all and studied the early days. The club had a collection of old 16mm movies too. It was a fun crowd that did more partying then jumping.

I switched to Xenia Ohio in 1970---the Beech came by and I got on.
I Jumped with the guys who invented Skydiving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Same picture as attached to original post, but this time in color, from Sky Diver.

HW

Quote

This photo, scanned from Howard Gregory's "The Falcon's Disciples," shows three well-known camera dudes and a legendary pilot etc.
Art Armstrong is flying his C-185, with strut-mounted Nikon.
In the door is Chip Maury, with a 16mm Bell and Howell movie camera, helmet mounted Nikon, and hand-held 4x5 K-20.
Below him is Luis Melendez, with Nikon on helmet and holding a 4x5 Speed Graphic. Lyle Cameron is on the step, with a 16mm KB3A movie camera and KB10 still camera.

HW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There was (according to Poynter) a Crossbow "snap on" model which was similarly convertible. And I think my first pig, which I bought in 1967 as I was about to start putting out static line students, was a Strong container on a Pioneer harness which had D-rings. It was not convertible.
I'll look for pictures.

HW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's free!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0