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Mindcake

First mal/reserve ride

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This is debatable. If there is enough altitude, I sure would try to fix any problem with the main rather than save that altitude for the remote possibility of a problem with the reserve. I don't plan for trouble with reserves(but then again I pack my own). As a plus it's easier to find your main if it doesn't drift too far...

I agree altitude is a big factor in knowing when to cutaway. In this case 3000 feet to fix a none spinning malfunction in my opinion is to long. Waiting till you get to 2000 feet to cutaway to find your main parachute I think is not appropriate. I personally would use that time to make or fix any situations that may occur with my reserve. You should always plan on the worst case scenario at all times, but hope for the best. this is one reason that hook knives are worn. Would you use your hook knife on your main??? or your reserve??? Please keep in mind that reserve parachutes are still parachutes and still have the possibility to have a malfunction.

with rigs equipped with an RSL(or just the possibility of fitting one), the side with no RSL should be released slightly before the other side to ensure a clean cutaway before reserve deployment.
As stated by the skydiver who cutaway, he said that he cartwheeled when he released his main parachute was this caused by one side releasing before the other. what is the correct length of reserver cutaway cable from the reserve housing gromet to the end of the reserve cutaway cable on both risers of the three ring system. Is it different for a rig with out a RSL. Please any information would be greatly appreciated thanks.
Blue Skies

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The length of the cable depends on the rig and its maker. Some have long cables of more then 4 inches, others have 3 inches or less sticking out. As for the difference, I was thinking most systems I've jumped was at about 3/4 -1 inches different. And no, this is not an RSL specific thing, its for all rigs by a maker have that difference.
Yesterday is history
And tomorrow is a mystery

Parachutemanuals.com

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Quote

Quote




it was the first time I actually looked at the plane after jumping and I thought it was bitchin!.

How did you get on free fall with out seeing the plane what program did you take sounds like you shouldn't have been doing your first free fall if you had not seen the plane before this jump how could the jump master know if you where jumping out of the plane with your eyes open or closed and if your head was down not a good arch position to be in.



WOW! :o Ummm... Here we go! As a student (and we all have our own unique joys & fears)...

We don't usually have time to smell the freefallin' daisies. Our Jedi Masters, or instructorsB|, demand performance... Alti aware! Stable this, head up this.. left turn that.. etc. It's great, because it challenges you each time, and keeps you busy.

Personally I probably glimpsed at my mothership a few times... sometimes it was from below as I looked up for my approaching instructor, or various other wacked views. Was it foremost in my mind? Hell no, I had a job to do. :)

The hop and pop was another story... It's your grad jump, and all you're gonna do is leave, count, and POP! I know that for me.. my Jedi Master at the time- the infamous SkySlut- told me he'd be giving me a hand signal and that I'd better watch him as I fell- and remember the hand signal he gave me, or else they'd have me drawn and quartered on the hanger roof!

Talk about the frickin' bomb! :D That was one hell of a cool jump. And this was the first time that the plane was pretty much the only thing that had my attention during my 3 sec f.f. (other than my responsibilities, of COURSE! :P) So ya remember it perfectly! :ph34r:

I, for one, will be checkin' out my jumpship more often now.. she's a beaut! ;)

---
** Blue Skies, Yellow Mustard. **
It's like a farmer, out-standing in his field.

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I did that too on my hop and pop. Hand signals that is. The DZO came up on the load with us, and was talking about how he usually gives the thumbs up, then we just gotta repeat it as we're falling away from the strut.
So I climb out, check out the smiley face on the underside of the wing (chin up), let go and as I'm falling I automatically give him the thumbs up, but wait a sec! What's this!? He's fingering me and grinning hugely, seeing that he's fooled me. So I switch from the thumbs up to a big double "F U 2!" and go back to arch and pull on time. Great jump, I'll always remember seeing him and a huge grin coming across my face as I thought "Ha! You jackass!" We had some good laughs about that later on the ground. That was the jump when I really learned to relax some.

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I was given the "okay" signal on my hop/pop... which I later found out meant soooommmething else! ;) "You're flyin' like an bleep-hole." Hahaha. Different interpritations, but same signal. B|
The other grad jumping on my load after me received the "DRINK MORE BEER" signal. :D

---
** Blue Skies, Yellow Mustard. **
It's like a farmer, out-standing in his field.

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I was not the last to leave the plane but everyone behind me was involved in a tandem (tandem master/student or video) and they took some time to exit after me. I still checked my air space and could see the drogues of the tandem rigs some distance away. I was subsaqently told that I was ok because of my 5,000 ft alt when I pulled but that one should never exit at 14,500 and pull at 9,000 but rather hop'n'pop at whatever alt or wait until 6,000 ft or under, is this correct? The explanation that the air at higher alt allows you to fall at a faster rate and this could really bang you on the opening seems plausable but is it correct? any input would be appreciated.

Thanks for everyones constructive criticisim, it greatly improves my knowledge and allows me to formulate my own opinion when many people respond with their opinion

Don´t belive the hype

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Mindcake,

I did this a couple of times: exit at 12.5k, practice sit-exit & hold for a few secs, then back to belly, wait a few secs, then pull and fly around for a looong time :) I didn´t really notice any difference in opening w/pulling at 3.5k but then I jumped a soft-opening Spectre at the time. Of course I DID notify everybody that I was opening that high.

ciel bleu,
Saskia

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You did well...
It's a good idea to give yourself a mental cut-off point (do this on the ground), where if you find yourself in trouble with a low speed problem, you'll be prepared when that height comes round.

Re. RSLs:- It seems to me that we see people killed
worldwide every year where an RSL or AAD would have saved them. Very few (although there are some) are in a situation where the RSL/AAD contributes to the problem. So taking the RSL off or
swithching off an AAD requires a decision based on
a full appreciation of the consequences good or bad.

You're only as good as your last malfunction drill...
Practice and stay current on the ground - it could be really useful one day.

Blue Skies Every Day

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