0
Lostinspace

Force to deploy reserve, Small girl

Recommended Posts

I was checking the student rig I jumped last Friday. To me, a know nothing new jumper, the reserve pin seems to be held REALLY tight. I asked one of the instructors about it, he confirmed it was perfectly normal.

I have been in the hanging harness to practice cutaways, which does not extract a reserve pin.

I am only 5’0, … no muscle. If I have to deploy my reserve, assuming the RSL has not done it for me (ie pilot in tow), am I going to have the strength to extract the reserve pin. Is it hard?

Belinda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ask a rigger around there if there are any rigs going out of date, especially the student gear, and if you could pull the reserve handle on it before the repack. If nothing else, it'll give you some confidence.
---------------------------------------------------------------
There is a fine line between 'hobby' and 'mental illness'.
--Dave Barry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A reserve handle can have no more than 22 pounds of pull force. That's per FAA rules.

The pin is supposed to be held tight, it's a lot less chance of a premature deployment. But it shouldn't be so much that you can't pull it. There are plenty of small women in skydiving that have used their reserves.

What you might try doing, if it worries you that much, is to see if your rigger will let you fire off the reserve (on the ground) on one of the student rigs the next time the reserve is due to be packed.

That should give you a much better idea of what's in store for you.

In fact, go full tilt with it. Simulate an entire emergency. Throw out the PC, then follow with your full emergency procedures with the rig. :)
Sky, Muff Bro, Rodriguez Bro, and
Bastion of Purity and Innocence!™

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I had the same concerns, I was given the opportunity to pull the reserve on a rig needing a repack. It wasn't as bad as you might think, but it took some effort. I can imagine it would be more difficult if it was cold and I'd forgotten to wear gloves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is no way you should be jumping unless you are certain that you can do anything/everything necessary to save your life in any emergency situation.......

Sort it out before your next jump......its easy for a rigger to arrange a real reserve pull on the ground.....

Why have you neglected to mention this problem to your instructor before now???....Ask for gods sake, thats what instructors are for.....but no instructor can read your mind.....
My computer beat me at chess, It was no match for me at kickboxing....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To add to the topic...

If there isn't a rig that's out of date or about to be out of date, see if you can use one of the rigs anyways, specifically see if you can use the rig you normally use. You'll probably need to do this on a Monday or something like that and be prepaired to pay for a repack (if the rigger wants that) or atleast bring some beer for the rigger's troubles.

This is something that can easily be done for you, all you need to do is ask the instructors/S&TA and/or the school's rigger.:)
--"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I m 5'2 130 out the door and I had my first cutaway last weekend, I was terrified of it, all I had done at this point was handle touches and alot of muscle mental memory. My cutaway last weekend was from a spinner that put me on my back, I was amazed after I landed nicely under my pretty white reserve how easy it really was. My rig is equipped with an RSL, I know it beat me to my reserve handle, I was under my reserve in less than 5 seconds. I am really glad that I got it out of the way, & BTW, reserve pins are that tight, I have several rigger friends and have watched a few reserve pack jobs and yeah its right...:o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

To add to the topic...

If there isn't a rig that's out of date or about to be out of date, see if you can use one of the rigs anyways, specifically see if you can use the rig you normally use. You'll probably need to do this on a Monday or something like that and be prepared to pay for a repack (if the rigger wants that) or at least bring some beer for the rigger's troubles.

This is something that can easily be done for you, all you need to do is ask the instructors/S&TA and/or the school's rigger.:)



>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Yes!

I often invite junior jumpers to pull ripcords when reserves are due for repack.

Rob Warner
FAA Master Rigger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One rigger used to charge extra for repacks if he had to pull the reserve. Figured the jumper should do it for the practice.

When pulling the reserve, make sure you pull the handle straight down, the same direction the cable housing runs. There is some slack in the cable, of course, so you can back up and slam it straight down if you have to. Also, you can use two hands if you need to. Hit the gym and do a little weight training. A little bit of muscle will go a long way in our sport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
>assuming the RSL has not done it for me (ie pilot in tow), am I
>going to have the strength to extract the reserve pin. Is it hard?

Per design specifications it can be as high as 22 pounds. We've seen over 50 pounds pull force on rigs that were incorrectly maintained or packed, but that's rare. One big issue is - how does the rig fit you? If it's a good fit, you're not likely to have a problem. If the main lift web is loose, and easily comes away from your chest when you pull on it, it may make the pull harder - especially if you don't pull straight down because there's too much slack in the harness.

Nearly everyone can pull with 22 pounds of force, and most people can even deal with the 50+ pounds you can get with the improperly maintained gear we've seen. It's not usually a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...Nearly everyone can pull with 22 pounds of force, and most people can even deal with the 50+ pounds you can get with the improperly maintained gear we've seen. It's not usually a problem...

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

My second reserve ride almost turned into a crater due to a VERY hard reserve pull. I remember watching the rigger struggle to close the container. There was no test of the pull force; in fact, in a later conversation he simply told me he "didn't pull test" reserves. I got open around 400' after struggling to get the thing out since my chop at 2000'-ish. Got kicked off the DZ.

After this incident, I always checked the ripcord prior to the first jump of the day by gently pulling the ball end and verifying that the pins would slide in the loops. My last cutaway was a piece of cake, with an open reserve above 1000'.

What's the point in having a steerable reserve if you don't open high enough to steer toward anything?

Cheers,
Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I was checking the student rig I jumped last Friday. To me, a know nothing new jumper, the reserve pin seems to be held REALLY tight. I asked one of the instructors about it, he confirmed it was perfectly normal.

I have been in the hanging harness to practice cutaways, which does not extract a reserve pin.

I am only 5’0, … no muscle. If I have to deploy my reserve, assuming the RSL has not done it for me (ie pilot in tow), am I going to have the strength to extract the reserve pin. Is it hard?

Belinda



It's not that hard. Use both hands if you have to, though. If you have a pillow reserve, remember to peel before you pull (just like the cutaway).

I practice on nearly every plane ride. Feel for hackey, put hands on handles, pretend peel and pull cutaway, pretend peel and pull reserve. I was pleasantly surprised at how instictive it had become when I really needed it.

edit to add... it's good to gain some muscle because it helps tremendously in flying, using risers, and not tiring out after only a few jumps. Get out there and workout:D

-A



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

verifying that the pins would slide in the loops.



Good point, but you don't have to pull on the far end of the cable. You can just try grab the base of the pin and try to slide it a bit. You can get a good idea of the force required.
People are sick and tired of being told that ordinary and decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I’m certainly not, and I’m sick and tired of being told that I am

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
B|

yes you will most definatly don't worry, and once you have to pull your reserve you'll feel completely comfotable with your equipment and your ability to handle the situation, just remember don't be that person that lost thier head when they needed it, stay calm, cool and collected do what you've been taught and you will have a 5.0 landing balls of the feet, thigh, butt, pull up muscle and roll...B|
it's all in your ablity to stay in control of the situation.
AIRBORNE
Send lawers, guns and money!!!!!

The shit has hit the fan!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm fairly small 5'2" 125 pounds. When I started jumping I was big into weight training but have totally quit working out over the past 3 years. I also brok my left arm/elbow last year. I had a high speed mal last w/e and was totally able to pull my reserve with one hand. I was prepared to loop my right hand around the handle if necessary and had even practiced doing that in case of a hard pull, but thankfully it wasn't.

PLEASE, make sure to do a practice pull. Gear up totally. Actually throw out your PC (just trash pack the main), have someone shake your harness violently (from behind is better) then cutaway and pull the reserve. That will give you confidence that you can handle the situation.

Good luck and be safe.

--
Hot Mama
At least you know where you stand even if it is in a pile of shit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I'm fairly small 5'2" 125 pounds.(and dead sexy) When I started jumping I was big into weight training but have totally quit working out over the past 3 years. I also brok my left arm/elbow last year. I had a high speed mal last w/e and was totally able to pull my reserve with one hand. I was prepared to loop my right hand around the handle if necessary and had even practiced doing that in case of a hard pull, but thankfully it wasn't.

PLEASE, make sure to do a practice pull. Gear up totally. Actually throw out your PC (just trash pack the main), have someone shake your harness violently (from behind is better) then cutaway and pull the reserve..



OUCH:D:D:D
Dont have them standing behind when you pull the reserve, it could really fuck up their day:D:D:D
You are not now, nor will you ever be, good enough to not die in this sport (Sparky)
My Life ROCKS!
How's yours doing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

All fear has been removed.

I got to use the metal handle the other day. One hand, and I don't remember feeling any resistance.

I also don't remember seeing my reserve open. I pulled and the reserve was over my head.



Glad to see everything worked out. Congratulations on handling it.B|

Sparky
My idea of a fair fight is clubbing baby seals

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In live tests run by Jumpshack on hundreds of live subjects, Female produced 26 to 118 lbs of force with one hand and 58 to 248 lbs with two hands.

Even the weakest can easily pull the required 22lbs max pullforce on a reserve pin.

:)
I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hey belinda! congrats on getting this part over with! at my dz we have a simulated area should we ever face this --- but we aren't in freefall --- that would be hard to simulate i guess :$ I am about the same size as you (5'4/100lbs) and was of scared I woyuldn't be strong enough.. so I'm glad to read your post. Can I ask your WL & canopy size? did you pack? What kind of mal did you have?
stay safe girly:)

If the world didn't suck, we'd all fall off!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It really is not that interesting. If you guys really want to hear, I will share.

Wee, you’re probably better off hearing about malfunctions from your instructors. I only know enough to be reasonably safe and not hurt myself under a relatively large canopy.



Thank you all for being so nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oh trust me--- i ask and ask and ask. i'm an asker and totally nosy when it comes to mals because what if it happens to me?? if i ever have one--- ya'll will get a play x play. i'll be waiting for my call from 20/20 to share my story:ph34r:
no seriously, dont feel like you have to tell what happened. i just feel better after learning from others. for some reason, reading it from the manual is different than hearing it from somebody and how they handeled it.:)

If the world didn't suck, we'd all fall off!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

0