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passing out

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I did a tandem skydive about 3 years ago. I think about doing it again often since then, but I want to learn to skydive by myself this time.

Problem is I got this fear of passing out during freefall. Do they have safeguards so you dont kill yourself if you happen to passout?

Thanks

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I did a tandem skydive about 3 years ago. I think about doing it again often since then, but I want to learn to skydive by myself this time.

Problem is I got this fear of passing out during freefall. Do they have safeguards so you dont kill yourself if you happen to passout?

Thanks



No.

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Technically there's your AAD which should deploy your reserve if it needs to. The thing is, if you're concerned about passing out in freefall... skydiving probably isn't for you.

Do more tandems?
I really don't know what I'm talking about.

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Technically there's your AAD which should deploy your reserve if it needs to


Although it more than likely would, jumping relying on it is a mistake IMO.
And an AAD will not make a difference if passed out under your main.

"For once you have tasted Absinthe you will walk the earth with your eyes turned towards the gutter, for there you have been and there you will long to return."

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Problem is I got this fear of passing out during freefall. Do they have safeguards so you dont kill yourself if you happen to passout?

I found it's a common question and fear by many newbies. I get asked that. I wondered that too. You get over that fear rather quickly (you should, if you really want to skydive).

And there's always the AAD to automatically deploy, if worse does come to worse. It's not failsafe but it does help many newbies get over the initial fears, whether the regulars like it or not....

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The chances of simply passing out while in freefall are extremely remote. However, all student jumpers' gear is equipped with an automatic activation device (AAD) to deploy your reserve canopy at about 800 ft if you don't have a survivable main canopy over your head by then.

This having been said, skydiving instructors understand that first-time jumpers often have sensory overload and the "fear factor" to deal with until they have a couple jumps under their belts. Therefore, each of the 3 most common methods of training new jumpers is designed to minimize the effect of this factor.

1. In Static line or Instructor-Assisted Deployment (IAD) jumps, all the student does is exit the aircraft, and the main canopy is automatically opened for him/her immediately, with full inflation occurring in roughly 4 seconds.

2. In tandem jumps (as you have experienced), including "working tandems" in the Accelerated Freefall Progression (AFP) method, your Tandem Instructor is responsible for deploying the canopies, so "student freeze" is not really an issue. Most "tandem progression" programs have you do 2 or 3 tandem jumps first, to get your senses accustomed to experiencing freefall, to learn basic stable body position, and to introduce you to a couple basic maneuvers (such as controlled turns and forward movement) before moving you on to further training.

3. In Accelerated Freefall (AFF), on your first 2 or 3 jumps you will have 2 instructors holding onto you from the moment you exit the aircraft through the entire jump, keeping you in a stable body position during freefall. Although you'll be trained to deploy your own canopy, each instructor can (and will) deploy one of your canopies for you if it appears you're overloaded and need the assistance. On later AFF jumps, you will have 1 instructor exiting the aircraft with you.

Dropzone.com has a dropzone locator function to help you find drop zones close to your home. Use it, and then call or visit a couple drop zones directly. (This is much better than using any kind of so-called "referral service") Speak to the drop zone's owner or instructors and ask them to explain their student programs to you. (Weekends are very busy on DZ's, so they may have more time to speak with you on weekdays.)

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Is there any reason you would think you might pass out in freefall? If there is then perhaps taking up skydiving isn't a great idea - seek medical advice. If there isn't anything in particular about your medical history which would suggest a pre-disposition to falling unconscious at random times or under stressed conditions then I think you might simply be imagining a risk which isn't really there... or at least isn't really that great.

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I think the possibility to pass out in freefall is extremely limited (except that you are a person who passes away often in normal live, then definitely skydiving, driving a car, pilot etc is not for you). But as mentioned above, in the very unlike case that you pass out, you still have the chance to survive if you jump with an AAD, which I think is obligatory for students in the US.
Michi (#1068)
hsbc/gba/sba
www.swissbaseassociation.ch
www.michibase.ch

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I dont have a history of passing out in everyday life,so it probably won't be a problem.Just something to think about I suppose. In the end nothing is going to stop me from jumping again. The excitement of jumping supercedes any fear I might have of passing out.

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If you passed out during a tandemjump, but you don't have a history of passing out in your daily life, you don't have to worry. It happens sometimes that tandempassengers passes out (some tandemgear is more prone to this than other).
If you still doubt about it, see a doctor.

I have made 5 tandemjumps as a passenger and 2 of them I didn't like. The harness was quite uncomfortable (PS I was allready a tandeminstructor at that moment).

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Technically there's your AAD which should deploy your reserve if it needs to


Although it more than likely would, jumping relying on it is a mistake IMO.
And an AAD will not make a difference if passed out under your main.



Agreed. Additionally an AAD will not prevent you from hitting the side of a building, landing in trees or water or frapping in without a flair. Nor does reserve deployment always insure inflation in time. Anyone with a current history of fainting should not be skydiving at all, including doing tandems.

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