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MotherGoose

How to learn to pack chutes . . .

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I was taught while I was still a S/L student. Ended up paying for most of my skydives as a packer while still a student.

I didn't pay anything for learning, just had guys hanging out and teaching me.

I guess times have changed that people have to pay some one to teach them how to pack [:/]

I'm always willing to teach some one for no charge.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. - Edward Abbey

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I don't know what you mean by endorsement.

My other is seek out ONE person who you want to learn from and ask them to teach you during NON jumping time. I prefer NOT at the DZ. 1 on 1, no distractions, and only one persons instructions to remember.

THEN once you have one way down, you can seek opinions and varitations from others and use them or not.

Trying to learn from multiple people is a real pain.

I've done this for people a few times and baked goods or beer is always welcome as a thank you. But I don't charge for it because no one could afford it.;) Too many people gave too much to time and effort to me over the years for me not to give some back.

This is "old school" but that's where I'm from.

All the better if it is an instructor to give you endorsement, but you can easily demonstrate ability to an instructor.

May or may not be available in your area.
I'm old for my age.
Terry Urban
D-8631
FAA DPRE

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Some combination, I think.

I took a class (which was required as part of my student program). The class was taught by a highly experienced packer/rigger in the evening. She spent 3-4 hours with a small group of students (3 or 4 of us, I think). We did complete pack jobs 3 times.

I'm a little slow, so after that class I still practiced a lot at the DZ. Instructors and other experienced jumpers were ALWAYS willing to help me out. That combination of a formal class (with written guides to take home with me) and lots of informal assistance really worked well for me.

I think (for me, at least) that if I didn't have the foundation of a class up front, I might have had more trouble. Everyone packs a little differently - if I'd learned to pack by getting a little bit here and a little bit there as people had down time, I don't think I would have learned as well.

I don't have a problem with paying for a class. Three hours of someone's time is something I have no issue paying for.

(Edit to add: In retrospect, the amount I paid for the packing class was probably too high considering I highly doubt the person who taught the class saw anywhere near that amount of money that was collected by the DZ for the class. But the general idea of paying for someone's time to teach it right, I still have no problem with.)
"There is only one basic human right, the right to do as you damn well please. And with it comes the only basic human duty, the duty to take the consequences." -P.J. O'Rourke

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There is one guy around here that has a Great program I think. He teaches students to pack in exchange for them packing his rig 5 times.

Basically he teaches them to pack on HIS rig (Supervising of course) and Jumps it and then has them do it again and again till they are confident in their packing.

He gets free pack Jobs, The Students learns to packs and gains confidence in their packs.

Best Idea I have seen.

Others will just teach you if you ask but I like peanuts plan better.

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Some combination, I think.
Instructors and other experienced jumpers were ALWAYS willing to help me out. That combination of a formal class (with written guides to take home with me) and lots of informal assistance really worked well for me.

I think (for me, at least) that if I didn't have the foundation of a class up front, I might have had more trouble. Everyone packs a little differently - if I'd learned to pack by getting a little bit here and a little bit there as people had down time, I don't think I would have learned as well.

I don't have a problem with paying for a class. Three hours of someone's time is something I have no issue paying for.



Well said Krisanne

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There is one guy around here that has a Great program I think. He teaches students to pack in exchange for them packing his rig 5 times.

Basically he teaches them to pack on HIS rig (Supervising of course) and Jumps it and then has them do it again and again till they are confident in their packing.

He gets free pack Jobs, The Students learns to packs and gains confidence in their packs.

Best Idea I have seen.

Others will just teach you if you ask but I like peanuts plan better.



OOOH I like that idea! I've hop n poped other student's student pack just to show them they are indeed doing it right, but that is a nice idea.

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I had no paid packing lessons. There are not any packers in some countries. You might receive 1-3 free packjob as a part of the FJC. If you want to jump, you have to pack, so if you jumped it, you have to pack it.

There was the old school in behind the iron curtain. You had to learn how to pack before you could start jumping. That is over for good.

I had really good teachers: instructors, skydivers and canopies. People can just show that path, their way, but you have to learn your own.

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or what about ask the packers some of them are nice and will help you learn to pack your f'ing 210 sabre 2 so they can focus on packign the sub 100s and making more oney with less sweat

Dave
http://www.skyjunky.com

CSpenceFLY - I can't believe the number of people willing to bet their life on someone else doing the right thing.

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There is one guy around here that has a Great program I think. He teaches students to pack in exchange for them packing his rig 5 times.

Basically he teaches them to pack on HIS rig (Supervising of course) and Jumps it and then has them do it again and again till they are confident in their packing.

He gets free pack Jobs, The Students learns to packs and gains confidence in their packs.

Best Idea I have seen.

Others will just teach you if you ask but I like peanuts plan better.



OOOH I like that idea! I've hop n poped other student's student pack just to show them they are indeed doing it right, but that is a nice idea.



Teaching in exchange for 5 pack jobs means that the students are being charged $25 worth of labor - so it is still in the category of "charging".

-
Mykel AFF-I10
Skydiving Priorities: 1) Open Canopy. 2) Land Safely. 3) Don’t hurt anyone. 4) Repeat…

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Some combination, I think.



This is an excellent reply so far . . . an official course with a structured training program is excellent and helps standardize the method, but upon completion, one should also seek advice from up-jumpers for various techniques, tricks and shortcuts to improving your newly learned craft.

I also strongly agree with NWFlyer about the % of the fee and what portion of it goes to the actual instructor . . . that opinion may get me in trouble.

Overall, I'd just like to say that I am a bit puzzled at the lack of regulation involved in this facet of the sport. I consider packing to be a VERY important part of skydiving, and why there is no standardized training method for all jumpers is questionable to say the least. Opinions ???
You think you understand the situation, but what you don't understand, is that the situation just changed.

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Overall, I'd just like to say that I am a bit puzzled at the lack of regulation involved in this facet of the sport. I consider packing to be a VERY important part of skydiving, and why there is no standardized training method for all jumpers is questionable to say the least. Opinions ???



In general I dont think most skydivers want more rules and regulations.

There are MANY packing methods (Flat Pack, Pro Pack, Psycho Pack) and all are acceptable. The last thing we want is FAA and/or Other Agency regulating how we pack our mains.

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Just a quick note about mentoring . . . it was a lot easier to "mentor" when the skydiving community was a fraction of the size that it is today. It seems to me that there are a lot of new jumpers coming up and there just aren't enough instructors to go around to take these people under their wing for free and show them the ropes. And as for up-jumpers that aren't instructors . . . that's a dying breed at my DZ . . . and the ones that are around aren't in the spirit of giving.
You think you understand the situation, but what you don't understand, is that the situation just changed.

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There are MANY packing methods (Flat Pack, Pro Pack, Psycho Pack) and all are acceptable. The last thing we want is FAA and/or Other Agency regulating how we pack our mains.



How about the USPA . . . why not let skydivers set some rules about skydiving ?? No one wants the Feds in the picture . . . some skydiver-sanctioned rules would be nice, no??
You think you understand the situation, but what you don't understand, is that the situation just changed.

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I was taught by one of my friends and packers at my DZ in about 15 minutes...

I just asked if there was something I was a little foggy about a little later. I knew all the saftey do's and don'ts. The stuff like better control for bagging just came with practice.

Knock on wood, but I have pretty good results thus far.

Set the brakes, uncollapse and later quarter the slider, walk the lines, flake the cells, control the fabric. It isn't rocket science. :D
"The restraining order says you're only allowed to touch me in freefall"
=P

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Overall, I'd just like to say that I am a bit puzzled at the lack of regulation involved in this facet of the sport. I consider packing to be a VERY important part of skydiving, and why there is no standardized training method for all jumpers is questionable to say the least. Opinions ???



Packing your main isn't that complicated. Stow the brakes on landing and uncollapse the slider. Lines in the middle, fabric outside, slider against the stops, don't push the nose in. Cock the pilot chute. Make sure there's no canopy between bridle and D-bag gromit. Close according to the manufacturer's instructions, keeping the pin between your pull-up cord and closing loop on extraction to prevent premature wear. The parachute will open reliably. If it's a modern design it'll do so comfortably.

You might not have a collapsible pilot chute & slider on your first gear... but thinking about it could make it a habbit. Like CGUMPS with U for undercarriage on final in a Cessna 172 without retractable ger.

Added training packing is just going to make it quicker and less work. What sort of training and techniques are effective will depend a lot on the individual and gear involved.

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There are MANY packing methods (Flat Pack, Pro Pack, Psycho Pack) and all are acceptable. The last thing we want is FAA and/or Other Agency regulating how we pack our mains.



How about the USPA . . . why not let skydivers set some rules about skydiving ?? No one wants the Feds in the picture . . . some skydiver-sanctioned rules would be nice, no??



They're more like 'guidelines' than actual rules :D

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How about the USPA . . . why not let skydivers set some rules about skydiving ?? No one wants the Feds in the picture . . . some skydiver-sanctioned rules would be nice, no??



NO.
Guidelines maybe.. But we have too damn many rules now. And who is going to enforce these Rules??

Too many rules now.

Skydiving is a Big Boy sport. We dont need other people doing more thinking for us. Each DZ is free to set thier own rules.

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Knock on wood, but I have pretty good results thus far.



This is exactly my point !! Should new jumpers be taught to pack with enough confidence to have to "knock on wood" when they are done?? HELLO?? I want to be taught by EXPERIENCED people with many hundreds or thousands of packs so that I am not leaving anything to chance.
You think you understand the situation, but what you don't understand, is that the situation just changed.

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Knock on wood, but I have pretty good results thus far.



This is exactly my point !! Should new jumpers be taught to pack with enough confidence to have to "knock on wood" when they are done?? HELLO?? I want to be taught by EXPERIENCED people with many hundreds or thousands of packs so that I am not leaving anything to chance.



Relax! It'll open.

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Skydiving is a Big Boy sport . We dont need other people doing more thinking for us. Each DZ is free to set thier own rules.



Im sure you are gonna hear about that from some sky-chick Anyhow, I agree with you that we don't need more regulation . . . just STANDARDIZATION !!! Let's get the world's top skydivers together at a big meet to discuss standardized methods for training, packing, equipment, etc. Is that getting people to think for you?? NO . . . its letting experience guide you down the right path.
You think you understand the situation, but what you don't understand, is that the situation just changed.

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was a lot easier to "mentor" when the skydiving community was a fraction of the size that it is today. It seems to me that there are a lot of new jumpers coming up and there just aren't enough instructors to go around to take these people under their wing for free and show them the ropes.



in case you haven’t noticed, This sport is shrinking not growing. I think the fading of the mentoring system is partially to blame.

And yes, You’re correct. It is SAD that there are not enough mentors to go around. The Coach rating requirement has alot to do with that..

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