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JustRelax

rerigging a brake line twist

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discovered I had rerigged myself into a line twist. Jumped it twice.

A full time rigger reconnected my chute to its risers and then I got my brake lines lengthened and the people who did it reconnected it. But I didn't double check this myself before I jumped it.

On packing I found the brake line was twisted around the other lines. I did a canopy check up high, and on looking up it seemed fine. The twist must have been low down so it didn't cause a problem.

So the lesson is always double check and rerigging.

ANyone else have a situation like this?

________________________________________
Taking risk is part of living well - it's best to learn from other peoples mistakes, rather than your own.

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Plenty of people have untied knots in their brake systems at 2,000 feet. I've had a couple myself.

Some people have doubtless tried and given up and done something else.

And some have tried and ended up in the incidents folder. :(

Last time I moved a canopy to different risers, I tried wrapping my brake lines around everything else. The DZO-rigger unscrewed it for me on the ground because he was watching. :$

-=-=-=-=-
Pull.

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Plenty of people have untied knots in their brake systems at 2,000 feet. I've had a couple myself.



That's not what he's talking about from what I read. It sounds like the brake line was wrapped around the line group, then run through the guide ring and attached to the toggle.

You're not correcting that mistake mid-flight.
Sky, Muff Bro, Rodriguez Bro, and
Bastion of Purity and Innocence!™

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That's not what he's talking about from what I read. It sounds like the brake line was wrapped around the line group, then run through the guide ring and attached to the toggle.



I know, that's not something that just "unties". I was mentioning both the "really bad" brake misrouting and the "not so bad" misrouting (like passing the toggle between the upper brake line and the riser and then stowing it regularly) at once.

I was just responding to a question of "has anyone else done something like this" and my answer was "I've done some almost-as-bad things I chose to fix in the air, and I did this on the ground but got it fixed before I jumped."

My problem in both cases was twofold:
1. There's sure a lot of lines!
2. The screwups aren't always visually obvious.

-=-=-=-=-
Pull.

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discovered I had rerigged myself into a line twist. Jumped it twice.

A full time rigger reconnected my chute to its risers and then I got my brake lines lengthened and the people who did it reconnected it. But I didn't double check this myself before I jumped it.

On packing I found the brake line was twisted around the other lines. I did a canopy check up high, and on looking up it seemed fine. The twist must have been low down so it didn't cause a problem.

So the lesson is always double check and rerigging.

ANyone else have a situation like this?



If you don't do a line check every single time you pack, you are leaving out a very important step.

I run the lines up, separately, from the links and toggles to the canopy before I sort out the nylon. It's fast and easy, costs you nothing, and it catches such things as misrouted lines, walk-throughs, and so forth.


Blue skies,

Winsor

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Are you saying when you do your line check you do each line? That would take a lot of time.

I normally, put the sets of lines from each riser separately through my fingers and again with the barake lines. This seems to be enough for packing. But I do do an individual line check after re-rigging (used to be after I rerigged - but now I have learned my lesson, after any rerigging)

________________________________________
Taking risk is part of living well - it's best to learn from other peoples mistakes, rather than your own.

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