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ifell

Signing jumps

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I've always gotten all my jumps signed off by another jumper. I do, however, log all my jumps in a given day on one line of my logbook to save space*. Technically once you have a D license you only need to get a jump signed off once every 6 months to be considered "current" no matter where you go, but I get my book signed off anyway because it's cool to have the record.

* I started logging that way about 1000 jumps ago because I started going through logbooks too quickly.

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I could be wrong here but I thought I was told by someone that the person signing off has to have a higher license than you.



your wrong. no but seriously, it just has to be a licensed person, i signed off a D license before and thats as legit as him signing mine.
JewBag.
www.jewbag.wordpress.com

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I'm not so sure it even has to be a licensed jumper. It's just supposed to be someone who witnessed the jump. I've got a couple of autographs from the helicopter pilots in my book. I also have the tandem students sign my book when they're writing down their address for the video.
"If it wasn't easy stupid people couldn't do it", Duane.

My momma said I could be anything I wanted when I grew up, so I became an a$$hole.

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I'm not so sure it even has to be a licensed jumper. It's just supposed to be someone who witnessed the jump. I've got a couple of autographs from the helicopter pilots in my book. I also have the tandem students sign my book when they're writing down their address for the video.



the pilot is allowed to sign off too.

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I'm not so sure it even has to be a licensed jumper. It's just supposed to be someone who witnessed the jump. I've got a couple of autographs from the helicopter pilots in my book. I also have the tandem students sign my book when they're writing down their address for the video.



From the SIM...

C. Logging jumps for licenses and ratings

1. Skydives offered as evidence of qualification must have been:

a. made in accordance with the USPA requirements in effect at the time of the jump

b. legibly recorded in chronological order in an appropriate log that contains the following information:

(1) jump number

(2) date

(3) location

(4) exit altitude

(5) freefall length (time)

(6) type of jump (formation skydiving, freeflying, canopy formation, style, etc.)

(7) landing distance from the target

(8) equipment used

(9) verifying signature

2. Jumps for license and rating qualifications must be signed by another licensed skydiver, a pilot, or a USPA National or FAI Judge who witnessed the jump.

3. Jumps to meet skill requirements must be signed by a USPA Instructor, Instructor Examiner, Safety & Training Advisor, or a member of the USPA Board of Directors.
Chuck Akers
D-10855
Houston, TX

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The other reason to have people sign is also a great reason to log in the first place: posterity. What kind of memories come up when you look at your Pro-Track at jump 378? "Hmmmm.... well, I exited at 13,200'.... my average fall rate was 121... I pulled at 3000'...."

I look at back at my log book and, "Oh cool! That's the 22-way I did in Lake Wales! That was an awesome jump. Lew Sanborn and Dave DeWolf were on that one. I've got their signatures!" B|
May the (relative) wind take your troubles away...

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it's a great idea to keep a written log book,, right from the start..:)it's a good thing.. that licenses, ratings, etc need proper documentation....
Plus it's a wondeful diary and after a while, an important keepsake...

As for the signatures,, yes, qualifying jumps need to be correctly endorsed but if a jumper reaches the numbers where most of that is acomplished, then why not enjoy asking for signatures from others...B|

Pilots for sure....;) They've earned those ratings, and numbers,, and like jumpers have them memorized,, and signing a jump is a
"Piloty", sort of thing...

but also ask for signatures, from non jumpers, or guests on the dz, or T1 and T 2 newbies who are at the DZ that day...:|

If i have seen a student, more than 2 or 3 times, and notice that they seem to be getting interested in this sport,,, by asking them to sign a jump or two,, i might be that nice further incentive towards encouraging that person to "come join us " and become a regular...

If the 'entourage' of a tandem person has been on site for a while and some conversations have occured,,, it's nice to ask one of those folks to sign off a jump....or a youngster or a child...( keep a crayon handy for those :ph34r:;) )

after all there are No "Log book police" out there and it IS a personal journal...

keep track of as much detail as you like and keep them safe...
Electronic log books are a great idea..saving your jumps that way is a fine option...
both is better....

jmy

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I'm not so sure it even has to be a licensed jumper. It's just supposed to be someone who witnessed the jump. I've got a couple of autographs from the helicopter pilots in my book. I also have the tandem students sign my book when they're writing down their address for the video.



I believe the jump pilot can also sign your logbook, complete with license #.
"Mediocre people don't like high achievers, and high achievers don't like mediocre people." - SIX TIME National Champion coach Nick Saban

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On the other side of the issue - I was honored the first time I was asked to sign someone's log book. I asked if I could.



I know exactly what you mean -- the first time someone asked me to sign their logbook (we'd just done a two-way) I felt so excited. I had just earned my A license the week before and I didn't even have a license number yet. The next time I saw him I had to ask for his log book so I could fill that in :)
A funny story: One of the guys I jump with once did a demo jump for Jimmy Carter. He has a picture of his landing on that jump hanging up in his house. Also in the frame is a copy of his logbook entry for that jump, which was signed by Carter. Apparently, he must have sent a copy of the entry (or maybe the original, I'm not sure) to the USPA, because at some point someone from the USPA wrote on it something like "not a valid signature -- needs a license holder."

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So what is the difference between:

2. Jumps for license and rating qualifications

3. Jumps to meet skill requirements

Obviously I know what a license requirement is, but what is a skill requirement? Can someone give me an example?



Skill requirement jumps are those on which the jumper demonstrates a skill needed for a license or rating, such as doing a figure 8, a 2-point 8-way, landing a certain distance from the target, etc.
Chuck Akers
D-10855
Houston, TX

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