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Bigjakesrq

NEWBIE seeks advice

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Okay here is my deal. I'm a big guy. 6'3" 330lbs. Going to lose a lot of weight, but I'm worried it's still going to be an issue. I read a few threads on here regarding high weight jumps. From what I gather nobody will be will to do a tandem jump with me even at my best weight (275). That's the least I've ever weighed in my adult life. I'm a big guy naturally. When I weighed 275lbs very little of it was fat if any. All that being said, here are my questions. Please bare in mind I don't know very much about the sport aside from the fact I really want to get into it!



I don't really have a desire to do a tandem jump at all which from what I gather nobody is likely to do a tandem with me anyway. So if I take classes can I jump solo for my 1st jump?

Also assuming I get back to my target weight of 275, am I still going to have to buy my own rig in order to jump. I know that 275 is still on the high side for a jump weight. That's why I'm asking.

Please any advice aside from lose the weight(I working on that) would be helpful. Thanks you in advance for any help.

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There are some experts on here regarding larger guys, but my understanding is that at 275 you're going to have a hard time finding traditional sport gear that works for you (legally)

Tandem Weight Limit is 500 pounds including the tandem rig, any other gear, passenger and instructor. (Just fyi, some people have been known to be willing to take the heavy guys cause they are lower weight skilled/strong instructors.)
~D
Where troubles melt like lemon drops Away above the chimney tops That's where you'll find me.
Swooping is taking one last poke at the bear before escaping it's cave - davelepka

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I'm not sure how much a DZ would be willing to do for you, and I'm not sure it's ever been done before on a regular basis, but you might be able to jump a Tandem canopy solo.

I've seen experienced jumpers do that to do a check-out of new Tandem equipment, so I know it's possible. Likely for a student, or likely for a DZ to do that?? Might not be very likely. But the least you could do is ask :)

Best of luck.
PULL!! or DIE!!

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I know a guy that must be about 6'5", maybe even a touch more. His weight has to be pretty close to your stated ideal weight. Been jumpng a smallish tandem canopy; can't recall the harness & container mods that required. Big baggy suit of course.

He just bought his first rig. I think it has about a 280 in it for a main. There must be other big guys out there that can relate directly. If you want, PM me and I'll try to connect you via email.
" . . . the lust for power can be just as completely satisfied by suggesting people into loving their servitude as by flogging them and kicking them into obedience." -- Aldous Huxley

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See, the problem is that the TSO C23 requirements to which reserve parachutes are certified against specify a MAX EXIT WEIGHT of 255lbs. So, at 275 + ~30lbs of gear, you are looking at 305lbs! This is why there is a "problem" for bigger guys in the sport rig market and why many people in this class have to move to the tandem rigs, which are tested with different requirments.

(Disclaimer, I got the 255lbs number from a manufactor's website but I'm sure others will correct me if I am wrong)
http://planetskydive.net/ - An online aggregation of skydiver's blogs.

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Skydive Deland used to do AFF for big guys, they had a tandem rig modified with a boc and throw out pc. I dont know for sure if they still do, but anythings possible with the right amount of money. Give them a call, and ask for Bob Hallett.
good luck and Blue SKiEs


Ray
Small and fast what every girl dreams of!

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1. Lots of threads on this topic. Some recent. Re-read them.

2. One of the resources you might contact directly is “BIGUN” here on DZ.com

3. If your question is about training techniques alone (without regard to your size), Yes, students can jump solo for their first jump (no tandem).

4. If your question is about GEAR and your size… it gets complicated.

5. There are ways to do it. Consult knowledgeable instructors and riggers.

a. SOME tandem rigs can be modified for big students

b. SOME military surplus might be suitable (based on what the gear is and its condition).

c. SOME manufacturers make big guy gear.

6. It is really important that you understand something about the weight limits that you will read on gear.

a. The harness must at least as strong as the canopies (both the main and the reserve). (once again… work with a rigger)

b. As you look at canopies, you will see a “Maximum Suspended Weight” (MSW). That is exactly what it says… the most that we can hang under the canopy (body plus ALL gear). A canopy might have an acceptably high MSW but be totally unacceptable for you. Just because it won’t tear apart during deployment doesn’t mean that it is big enough for you to FLY it safely and comfortably. Wing loading (lbs of weight divided by sq ft of canopy) influences many important elements of canopy flight… such as canopy speed and altitude lost in turns. If you found a canopy that had an adequate MSW but was too small to give you safe “student” flight characteristics…. You would be at increased risk of crashing your canopy and serious injury or death. (Again, work with rigger and instructor to determine what is the right WL for you on a specific canopy).

c. All of the previous paragraph applies to BOTH the main and reserve canopies. Many experts believe that the reserve should have even lighter wing loading than the main…an even bigger challenge for you.

7. If you hope to learn by the Accelerated Free Fall method, I suspect that you will find that even if you can solve the gear issues, you may find that some small instructors won’t jump with you. The problem is that you may fall too fast for some instructors to be confident that they can keep up with you if you should get unstable in freefall. On the other hand, you may find some big AFF instructors who are confident that they can keep you safe. If you have trouble finding AFF instructors… you might want to consider “static line” or “instructor assisted deployment” methods of instruction. Static line would likely involve more gear issues… however with instructor assisted deployment you might be able to use your own rig.

8. Expect to spend $$$$ even faster than “typical” size students.

9. Welcome aboard!
The choices we make have consequences, for us & for others!

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