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ever been told you messed up someone's jump?

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OK, I feel bad -- we should have noticed. I jump at Spaceland, and generally a fair amount with newbies, but I'll admit that much of this year we were doing 10-way.

So -- next time I'm out there and you see me, feel free to let me know who you are. Because I'm by no means regular enough to know everyone as they come up.

One thing to consider (and this holds true for anyone trying to figure out where they belong on a dz) is that if you show up early, it's easier to become a part of one of the informal day-groups that seems to form. If you show up at 1PM, well, often groups are already formed, and they look like they're all set up, and they might have the next jump planned -- etc. etc. etc.

I pretty much look like my picture, and hang out in the packing room at the far end (i.e. far from the student packing area).

Wendy P.
There is nothing more dangerous than breaking a basic safety rule and getting away with it. It removes fear of the consequences and builds false confidence. (tbrown)

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Thanks for saying that, because I jumped by myself for probably 100 jumps after I finished the STP program with only a couple of jumps in between with another person.I was so worried about ruining someone elses jump that I chose to jump alone. I used the time to become more comfortable in the air; however, I wish I would have spent some of that time with other people.
Brian




Look for the old guy with all the red-white & blue gear, I'm down there quite a bit and always jump with n00bs....mostly because, they don't have enough experience to know how bad I am! ;):ph34r:










~ If you choke a Smurf, what color does it turn? ~

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....
.... i'm here to have fun! belly jumpers seemed to have lost how to do that. IMHO.



Hey, careful there! I'm a vivid belly flyer, enjoying every second and never felt bored. Don't know what perhaps you lost but, I did not forfeit anything in the air and still know how "to do that" ;);)

Jump with me, I'll show you B|

dudeist skydiver # 3105

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... its actually one reason why i stopped doing belly for the most part. its too structured and people got to butt hurt when something didnt go perfect, i'm not here to be a monkey, i'm here to have fun! belly jumpers seemed to have lost how to do that. IMHO.



Well, in fairness to whoever you were jumping with, you are terrible.

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That is really funny. I guess I don't really make an impression. I have jumped with you before, Wendy. I am even pretty sure that you were on my SCR (not 100% though). And I have seen you many times at the DZ, and I am also sure you have seen me and would know who I am if you saw me. I think I will put my picture on here when I get off of work. Thats why no one would jump with me, they didn't know I existed. J/K. For the record, I don't have that problem anymore.

Brian

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I jump at a very small single C182 DZ.

Daily jumps go completely wrong and a single point isn't made. Sometimes I do 10 jumps in a row with an A licensed jumper and only make a single dock from 10k.

Nobody takes offense, we offer advice and get straight back onto the load with said jumper.

Lifes too short to be a points nazi.

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With really low jump numbers, I was invited on a 6-way. We left the Blackhawk, it was my turn to do a 180, outface. I just didn't know how to turn at the time while staying de-arched. I just stayed in place. The organizer de-briefed me and was saying "Just turn dude, turn! Oh well.... That's why I'm willing to jump with low timers now. I don't care if they screw up. Any jump is a fun jump as long as we're safe.

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Then you ARE the Brian I was thinking you might be. I'll ask next time. I don't see you there all that often, but at Nationals I'll admit I was busy.

Wendy P.
There is nothing more dangerous than breaking a basic safety rule and getting away with it. It removes fear of the consequences and builds false confidence. (tbrown)

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i recently heard a couple of newer jumpers discussing a RW jump one of them had been on with some seasoned jumpers. and they mentioned being worried the other jumpers would tell them they messed up thier jump because they turned the wrong way for a point.

does this ever happen or was it the jumper's performance anxiety?




A. the guy fucked up
he should be telling the organizer and other jumpers that he fucked up, before the organizer can tell him....
at that level, he should know what to do to correct it and tell the organizer that ... he might get another chance

B. he did not fuck up ...
if he didn't, he should never admit he did .. EVER, no matter what

C. he fucked up, but the organizer thought he fucked up in a way totally different from the way he actually did (maybe organizer saw someone else and thought it was the fuckee)
stick to your story ... organizers aren't GOD..

been there ... done that

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People screw up all the time. That's life.
The hardest part of this sport when you're low time is figuring out if you screw up or someone else did. Alot of people point fingers to cover their own mistakes.
But, assuming one of these guys did make a mistake, so what. I jump with a mix of experience/skill levels all the time. Being more experienced, that should put the pressure on ME to design a dive that allows people with a lower experience/skill level to be successful. And when thing go to shit, it lets me do the kind of flying i would never do on a "good" skydive, like back-sliding 100' to offer a leg grip, or making a turn using my ankle for a pivot point to end up where I need to be.
This is the paradox of skydiving. We do something very dangerous, expose ourselves to a totally unnecesary risk, and then spend our time trying to make it safer.

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Yes I have been told that, especially early on in my jumping career. Then someone filled me in on the following advice:

Something that I have told low-time jumpers is to be breathtakingly honest with yourself and others when it comes to your abilities. You don't want to inflate what you can do, get on a really serious jump and have it blow up in your face due to your actions. Inversely you want to get on more challenging jumps to learn and grow as a jumper.

So by being honest with yourself and others, experienced jumpers know what they are "getting into" when jumping with you. That also gives them the opportunity to help teach you something and help you grow as a jumper, instead of simply assuming you can already complete that skill.

There are a large number of jumpers who want to help low time jumpers learn, jump and have fun doing it. There are also a number of jumpers who want to be on challenging skydives that have a very high success rate. Getting put with the former is fun. Getting put with the later too early on in your skydiving career can and will run jumpers off!
--"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."

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I had a wanna-be camera jumper tell me that I "took too long in the door" on my first AFF years ago after he had an off-airport landing. My two instructors and I made it back.
He never relented. It was funny for a couple years to see people's expressions as he recounted the story many times around the bonfire.
Roll Tide Roll

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I had a wanna-be camera jumper tell me that I "took too long in the door" on my first AFF years ago after he had an off-airport landing. My two instructors and I made it back.
He never relented. It was funny for a couple years to see people's expressions as he recounted the story many times around the bonfire.

It did he not make it back? If i was him i wouldnt exactly be retelling a story where a person on their FIRST JUMP EVER made it to the rigHt spot and he the "experienced camera guy" couldnt. Lol.
Thanatos340(on landing rounds)--
Landing procedure: Hand all the way up, Feet and Knees Together and PLF soon as you get bitch slapped by a planet.

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I just got my license. I want to jump w/ other people to improve my skills and have fun. To do that, I am going to do a couple of things:

1. Be honest w/ everybody about my experience so they know what they are getting into (I guess we are relatively a smaller DZ, so I think most people know that already).

2. Start small and build. I've only done one jump w/ somebody since getting my license. It was a 2 way and we worked on simple turns. It was good, successful and confidence building. I plan to stick w/ that kind of dive for a while.

Given that, if somebody told me I messed up his/her jump, I don't think I'd be inclined to jump w/ that person again.
"What if there were no hypothetical questions?"

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