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Anvilbrother

I don't have 200 jumps but I brought it on a jump to see what would happen..

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Not a camera a chest mounted heartrate monitor with watch type recorder. My rate was 118 just before exit, and 170 after deploying and clearing airspace. Always wondered how what it would be, now I know ;)

Postes r made from an iPad or iPhone. Spelling and gramhair mistakes guaranteed move along,

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Isnt 170 almost life threatning?



No, my best (or is that worst) is 184 on a skydive.
What i feel very strange is that my heartrate is lower on CRWjumps.

Just geting my gear on gives me a heartrate at ~110 :$
However calm you might feel, you cant hide it from the monitor

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Hi Chad,

Every now & then someone posts here interested in doing some 'study' of jumpers/anxiety/etc.

The first article I ever read on the subject was ~1965 in PARACHUTIST. The results of that study were that the point of highest anxiety on a jump was just when you pull. They authors alluded it to your not knowing if your canopy would open/open properly or not.

Looks like nothing has really changed in the last 45 yrs. :P

JerryBaumchen

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Exactly the same for me it was about 110 gearing up for a 6 min call, 130 in the plane at takeoff, back down to 100 while climbing. jumprun was around 130, after deployment it was 170 and my wriststrap hit the stop button after I made a turn under canopy and stopped recording. I imagine it went down a good bit under canopy then came back up on final since we had a no wind landing that jump , and I knew I needed to time the flare right and run it out.

Postes r made from an iPad or iPhone. Spelling and gramhair mistakes guaranteed move along,

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I've seen, first hand, three times, guy with heart rate 300 bpm. For couple of minutes that is.
Heart condition or not, still walking around. Or running.



I somehow seriously doubt that, or consider it quite a phenomenon. then again, if you've seen it with you're own eyes it's kinda hard to contradict..;)

normal going max heart rate however is somewhere just above 200 bpm, depending on age and such, so to me 300 seems a bit to high to sound believable..

but fun stuff, I think I'll wear my Polar for one of next jumps to see what part of the jump really excites me the most.. I think it might be the ride up and the last couple of mins before the door opens..

alex.

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I am sure it happened. And the guy lives.
Has nothing to do with jumping but chemicals.

Point is, jumping seems like natural, comparing to what humans can come up with..
and continue living.

There's variety in the garden.
I saw it, I know it. :o
What goes around, comes later.

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I've seen, first hand, three times, guy with heart rate 300 bpm. For couple of minutes that is.
Heart condition or not, still walking around. Or running.



I somehow seriously doubt that, or consider it quite a phenomenon. then again, if you've seen it with you're own eyes it's kinda hard to contradict..;)

normal going max heart rate however is somewhere just above 200 bpm, depending on age and such, so to me 300 seems a bit to high to sound believable..

but fun stuff, I think I'll wear my Polar for one of next jumps to see what part of the jump really excites me the most.. I think it might be the ride up and the last couple of mins before the door opens..

alex.

mine has been 270+ on several occasions from exercise
You are not now, nor will you ever be, good enough to not die in this sport (Sparky)
My Life ROCKS!
How's yours doing?

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mine has been 270+ on several occasions from exercise

Exercise? That's what David Carradine called it too. :P


Seriously, I'd like to try one of those monitors. I consciously try to control my excitement levels on jumps for better performance. I wonder if it works on my heart as well as my brain.

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I absolutely believe it. I always have a crazy fast heart rate - I have worn those and I was typically over 200 before jumping out of the plane (and that was as an experienced jumper!) I actually went to a doctor after I wore one during exercise.. I typically am about 80 sitting still - walking it goes up fast and after 30 seconds of jogging I hit 200 easy.. The most I ever saw on a heart rate monitor was 280 ( theoretical max was 220-my age!) Admittedly I was always good at sprinting but long distance killed me but I'm sure it was because of my heart rate..

Back when I had good insurance and I went to a doctor and did a full-blown treadmill cardio test and stuff and walking on the treadmill I was at a heartrate of 190 (not joggging - walking!!!!) when they stopped it. I was concerned but the doctor just shrugged and told me I just had a fast heart rate...

If I jog for 2 minutes my heart rate will be mid-200's... If I sprint I'm sure it would be higher..

(And I was around 33 when I did all those tests)

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Jerry--

I think i read a study a while ago thab said when your new to jumping your HR is highest at or jist before and as you stay with the sport that trend shifts to just before opening generally.
Thanatos340(on landing rounds)--
Landing procedure: Hand all the way up, Feet and Knees Together and PLF soon as you get bitch slapped by a planet.

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I hope yall with the super fast rates don end up with some kinda chest pain complaint in the back of an ambulace with a rate like that. Lol. Youd prolly get your ass cardioverted in a hurry. Lol. After about 170ish it all looks the same on a monitor. Lol. So FYI you better explain that that is normal before you get the shock of your life. Lol :ph34r:
Thanatos340(on landing rounds)--
Landing procedure: Hand all the way up, Feet and Knees Together and PLF soon as you get bitch slapped by a planet.

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Seriously, I'd like to try one of those monitors. I consciously try to control my excitement levels on jumps for better performance. I wonder if it works on my heart as well as my brain.




We had plans to have a "competition" at the DZ, and the rules was very easy, highest heartrate lose :)Finding the DZ chicken. :D
But now that we have a monitor, nobody seems to want to try it :D

Yes you can in some way control your excitement, as i said when i geared up my rate went up.
But just taking a few deep breaths and "not thinking" lowerd it again to ~90.
But when my friends started pointing at my gear and saying "That dont look right", it went up to ~130 even if i knew there was nothing wrong with my gear as i had done a proper inspection before gearing up (as i always do).

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Isnt 170 almost life threatning?




0 is a tad worse:P



Better for SOME people I know.

Isn't Twardo inthe negatives by now?
I'm not usually into the whole 3-way thing, but you got me a little excited with that. - Skymama
BTR #1 / OTB^5 Official #2 / Hellfish #408 / VSCR #108/Tortuga/Orfun

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Ham radio operators have put together radio telemetry gear for jumpers that transmits their heart rate, blood oxygen level, position, altitude, etc and mountain top ham radio repeaters automatically upload it to the Internet at

www.aprs.fi

HR of 170 isn't uncommon after exit.

See a screenshot below of an automatically generated Google Earth telemetry map of an 18K HAHO jump (pulled at 16K) made st Skydive Monterey Bay in March of 2010. You can see a telemetry data tag next to one of the jumper position icons.

We used fingertip pulseox sensors, decoded the data and transmitted plain text telemetry on the 2 meter ham band national APRS channel (144.390 MHz).


377
2018 marks half a century as a skydiver. Trained by the late Perry Stevens D-51 in 1968.

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Let's hear some low numbers.

At rest (not sleeping), I'm almost always below 50, and have been as low as 42.
" . . . the lust for power can be just as completely satisfied by suggesting people into loving their servitude as by flogging them and kicking them into obedience." -- Aldous Huxley

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