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high altitude jumping

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There is a little bit more to it than just taking the plane higher. 40 thousand feet is in a league all it's own. Do a search on "high altitude" and "HALO", you will find a good deal of information that will open your eyes to all of whats involved.
"It's just skydiving..additional drama is not required"
Some people dream about flying, I live my dream
SKYMONKEY PUBLISHING

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You are other skydiving dorks are the reason I dont post on here. You are almost as bad as some of the people on basejumper.com. Thats who I am. Im an asshole BASE jumper.

You trying to compensate for something else with your lifted Titan?

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You are other skydiving dorks are the reason I dont post on here. You are almost as bad as some of the people on basejumper.com. Thats who I am. Im an asshole BASE jumper.

You trying to compensate for something else with your lifted Titan?



what the hell are you talking about? I was sticking up for you.

yeah you got it right, everyone with a lifted truck is compensating for something else.

sorry us "skydivers" are not as cool as you basejumpers. At least we would be smart enough to do a search on a topic thats pretty well documented before posting.

HERE IS A LESSON FOR YOU IN FORUMS: when you see someone replied, take the 3 nanoseconds it takes to see who they replied to before you open your mouth.
Moriuntur omnes, sed non omnes vixerunt.

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yup, you are right. Totally read that wrong. Sorry man. My bad.

It is pretty well documented I know. But mostly from 30,000. Then there is always the stratos missions that never happen.

My bad dude.

I actually have a lifted Tacoma too haha.

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I understand that. Hypoxia, blah blah blah. But under 40,000 you dont need a pressure suit. I am wrong? Obviously its gonna be expensive...




First thing thats gonna limit this is the O2 equipment you will need for something that high. Civilian skydiver set ups will not suffice, it would have to be all military grade O2 equipment. I will skip covering all of the other issues I and others have discussed on this topic and go right to the heart of your question. I am still amazed how people think that going higher is no big deal and that they can do it with O2 equipment built using parts from ACE hardware.

Simple answer, you would have to be able to pressure breath and the additional altitude is not worth the risks involved.

As one ascends, it would be desirable to maintain the O2 pressure in the lungs as though they were at sea level.

This can be accomplished by simply breathing supplemental O2 up to 34K feet. At this altitude 100% O2 is required to maintain normal blood oxygenation. Above this altitude, up to 40k feet, 100% O2 under normal pressure will not fully oxygenate the blood but will provide acceptable protection from hypoxia. Above 40k feet, even 100% O2 is not enough. Therefore, to prevent hypoxia we must deliver oxygen to the lungs under increasing pressure to force it into the bloodstream. Some common problems of pressure breathing are:

1. reversed cycle breathing
2. Speech and communication difficulties.
3. Hyperventilation if done improperly

Problems at very high pressures:

1. mask leakage at 25mm
2. Pain behind the ears at 40mm
3. Lung over expansion at 60+ mm
4. Stagnant hypoxia due to reduced blood circulation (because of over expanded lungs)


The other dangers that increase exponentially that make the extra altitude not worth it is as you continue to ascend is the risk of decompression sickness and evolved gas disorders (Henry's Law)

1. The Bends
2. Skin manifestations
3. Chokes
4. Central nervous system manifestations


The factors that influence DCS are:

1. Rate of ascent, altitude and duration of exposure
2. Physical activity
3. Age and body fat
4. Individual susceptibility
5. cabin pressure ( above flight level 180 incidence of DCS increases)
6. Previous injury
7. Poor circulation
8. Dehydration and fluid intake
9. Extreme temperature
10. Diving prior to flight
11. Diving after flight
"It's just skydiving..additional drama is not required"
Some people dream about flying, I live my dream
SKYMONKEY PUBLISHING

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Has anyone here been interested in or looked into getting a HALO load going above 30G? Either by plane or balloon? And no im not talking about 100,000 feet here. But upwards of 40G.



Upwards of 40k you would technically need a partial pressure suit and anything above 50k a pressure suit helmet would be required which I doubt many people would offer. So perhaps 49k....classification extreme ;) Just out of curiosity, how much $$ would anyone estimate 45k to be if able to take?

HALO jumper offers up to 30k....perhaps you could talk to them about upwards of 40k and if they would allow it and have the equipment? http://www.halojumper.com/jumps_offered.html

Sorry Format buddy, but we both need at least a D license to even begin to think about doing above 40k jumps[:/]
For info regarding lift ticket prices all around the world check out
http://www.jumpticketprices.com/dropzones.asp

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Thats good info. Ive seen some of your posts already on these boards.
I never said that going higher was no big deal. If it is possible to jump above 30 and below 40 without pressure breathing, I was posting to see if anyone on these forums had experience with it. You seem to.
I have read of people jumping from 38000 from a balloon using civilian gear. Obviously cost and weather are just 2 factors that play into doing something like that. I assume that it is rarely done then because people do not want to take the risk and spend the money. And have the experience to do it.
Just something that interests me. Thanks for the advice.

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HERE IS A LESSON FOR YOU IN FORUMS: when you see someone replied, take the 3 nanoseconds it takes to see who they replied to before you open your mouth.



I will borrow the money needed for you to come over here. Come on, drinks and food and bed are free for you (for a week), just bring your big mouth and make me happy listening to it live.
You can punch me too, no sex.

This is really a friendly invitation, I have a spare room :)
What goes around, comes later.

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I have not, but it's something I'm interested in too. Not 40k, but more like 30k feet...

Not sure what part of the country you're in, but I know they periodically go to 30k in west tennessee, and I think also in Davis, CA. I believe the cost is something around $250-$300.

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HERE IS A LESSON FOR YOU IN FORUMS: when you see someone replied, take the 3 nanoseconds it takes to see who they replied to before you open your mouth.



I will borrow the money needed for you to come over here. Come on, drinks and food and bed are free for you (for a week), just bring your big mouth and make me happy listening to it live.
You can punch me too, no sex.

This is really a friendly invitation, I have a spare room :)


I'm all set, thanks for the invite. As far as punching you is concerned, I have a feeling other people have that covered.
Moriuntur omnes, sed non omnes vixerunt.

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Jumping above say 21 000 ft can causes very serious safety problems. This is why for such jumps at or near 30 000 ft, you should get a high altitude seminar with pro (at the WFFC such seminars were offered at 350.00$, the duration was three hours on evening and the jump was scheduled very early the following morning). That wouldn't guarantee the jump for you had to show a blood saturation of 97% or more at altitude or you couldn't jump. Seminars were dealing with related topics like hypoxia signs, physiological changes in case of hypoxia and how to recognize them, oxygen on board and bottle management, oxygen mask...etc, not a fluke at all. Remember that you lose 3.6 degrees F for each 1000 ft with respect to the ground temperature. At 30 000 ft the temperature will be 108 degrees F less than the one at the ground in ordinary weather conditions. Check with some DZ offering this kind of services
Learn from others mistakes, you will never live long enough to make them all.

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