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ManagingPrime

"hundred jump slump" experience?

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Having almost 3500 jumps in 7 years, I'm not sure what you're referring to.
:P

Haven't felt it. Even being out a few months with life, knee surgery, and recently after buying a house...I still yearn for the sky like nothing else.
well...almost...:P

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Hit it and I'm still trying to figure out the source of it. What's the experience with the hundred jump slump?



Are you feeling that you aren't getting on jumps/loads with others of sufficient skills to have successful/challenging/making progress on skills type of jumps?
People are sick and tired of being told that ordinary and decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I’m certainly not, and I’m sick and tired of being told that I am

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I've noticed it in other people, and I think the reason it didn't happen to me was joining a 4-way team around that point.

Just at the point where the progression curve can flatten out and motivation can flag, that suddenly gave me a whole new mountain to climb.

I'm still climbing it (and the rockier, pointier mountain that is 8-way)!

Even if it's not your thing long-term ('turning points looks boring blah blah blah'), a season learning even Rookie 4-way can turbo-charge your general skydiving, and your skill.
--
"I'll tell you how all skydivers are judged, . They are judged by the laws of physics." - kkeenan

"You jump out, pull the string and either live or die. What's there to be good at?

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Hit it and I'm still trying to figure out the source of it. What's the experience with the hundred jump slump?



I know exactly what you are talking about. I think that there are people who jump in order to "achieve" something and to prove to themselves that they can do it. I stopped jumping at just over a hundred jumps - admittedly meeting my wife was 90% of the reason.

There were a number of people who hung-out at the club, who had magically stopped at 100 jumps. I personally feel it is the point where you no longer see yourself as a student (hence the famous saying 100 jump wonder). A client of mine stopped jumping at just over 100 jumps as well - he feels that he has ticked the skydiving box and other things have his interest now.

The problem for me is skydiving is like crack, I can't hear a cessna without looking up and dreaming, I can't see blue sky without my heart being drawn to the sky. I can't get into a commercial airliner without working out freefall times, looking for outs, noting that we are at pull altitude etc.

So after 15 years of nagging my wife I will be back and hopefully not for another 100 jumps.

My advice is if you enjoy skydiving carry on and do what excites you. There is nothing wrong with just going out to the dz every now and again to do a couple of jumps when it takes your fancy either. Sure like that you will never progress like committed guys do - but so long as you are having fun. My only disclaimer on this, is jumping infrequently does mean that you are not "current" so stay ultra conservative in your skydiving.
Experienced jumper - someone who has made mistakes more often than I have and lived.

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It is when you think you have done enough that you think you have the basics down and want to get on the "hot" loads.

Problem is that with 100 jumps, you do not have the basics down and still make mistakes. This prevents you from getting on the "hot" loads and that is frustrating. You want to do something and think you are good enough and should be allowed, but you are not allowed.

You think that the only way to prove yourself is by those guys letting you on the "hot" loads, but they will not do it.

When you do make mistakes, it hurts your self pride.

So at around 100 jumps you:

1. Think you are better than you are.... And when you screw up that pisses you off.

2. Think that you should be allowed on the hot loads but are not invited.

3. You get upset that others will not let you use their skydive for your learning.

4. Have done enough that you think you can "check the box".

We had the same issue when I taught martial arts.
By the time a guy got to blue belt we had the "Blue belt blues".

I had it.... I just jumped right through it.
"No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms." -- Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson Papers, 334

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But life gets in the way sometimes, slumps can occur for many reasons. Maybe some get to 100 and figure things should be different/better and get discouraged. Dunno. :)



Think that's it. The desire to jump has not deminished, but life has thrown a lot at me and now that I'm not 100% obsessed with skydive I'm trying to figure out where it fits. It's frustrating. :S

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I'm not obsessed with it like I was in my twenties either. But it's still my favorite hobby/sport/pastime. It's also been a powerful motivator when I was doing rehab from surgery (wanting to jump again) and the source of some of my most fascinating friends and adventures. I'd tell you to proceed at whatever pace you like. No need to turn your back on skydiving just because you're going through a rough spot. :)

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I haven' heard that term in a while! :D

Back when it was only a sport, it took a couple of years to reach the 'triple digit fidget', you had your instructional ratings and a C license and were probably working on a rigging ticket...the next milestone was a D and a couple more years away.

You had lots of time, money and hangovers invested and started to question the reasoning...:$

Back then Goldwingers were rather few and far between, getting to jump with a couple of 'em tended to wash away the 100 jump slump, ya quickly realized that compared to a real sky-god...you didn't even know, what you didn't know! :D










~ If you choke a Smurf, what color does it turn? ~

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I'm not obsessed with it like I was in my twenties either. But it's still my favorite hobby/sport/pastime. It's also been a powerful motivator when I was doing rehab from surgery (wanting to jump again) and the source of some of my most fascinating friends and adventures. I'd tell you to proceed at whatever pace you like. No need to turn your back on skydiving just because you're going through a rough spot. :)


I agree, I had a shoulder surgery 1 month ago and all i think about is skydiving, I havent reached the hundred mark yet but im doing rehab and physical therepy with a goal of getting beack in the air. That is making me work twice as hard as i would otherwise

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Answer) Get coach rating. Have slot paid for. Problem solved.




:D:D:D:D:D:D:D

Although, it would be nice to be at a DZ that isn't saturated with coaches, riggers and instructors.B|
"I may be a dirty pirate hooker...but I'm not about to go stand on the corner." iluvtofly
DPH -7, TDS 578, Muff 5153, SCR 14890
I'm an asshole, and I approve this message

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I have experienced jump slumps several times. Usually not long after reaching some goal (A license, B license, Coach Rating) and having to find a new goal to achieve. Once I got over it by setting a goal (C license) another it was a random conversation with a couple of people at the jump center who were encouraging me and didn't even know about it.
POPS #10623; SOS #1672

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I agree, I had a shoulder surgery 1 month ago and all i think about is skydiving, I havent reached the hundred mark yet but im doing rehab and physical therepy with a goal of getting beack in the air. That is making me work twice as hard as i would otherwise

I'm 14 months past my rotator cuff repair, lookin' swoll and feeling great. B|

Keep me posted on your rehab progress. I used to look at all my skydiving pics on the wall while I'd do all those painful damn exercises. The desire to get back in the air was a HUGE incentive.

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When I've heard the term used it seems to be implied that it's a lag in jumping as compared to past frequency, with some kind of correlation to 100ish jumps. B|



if anything id say there is a sub 100 jump slump.
it took me about a year to make my first hundred jumps and then the next 200 after that only took me about 6 months.
Jump more, Bitch less.

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