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Rover

More Gropro footage - be careful out there!

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Someone needs to make a snag proof box for these fuckin little "harmless" cameras! >:(



The one right in the center.
"I may be a dirty pirate hooker...but I'm not about to go stand on the corner." iluvtofly
DPH -7, TDS 578, Muff 5153, SCR 14890
I'm an asshole, and I approve this message

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That's a long reserve ride :D

True, also some pretty decent HD flying:ph34r: although that rip cord smacking into your face might suck a bitB|
You are not now, nor will you ever be, good enough to not die in this sport (Sparky)
My Life ROCKS!
How's yours doing?

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Just a matter of time.:o[:/]

Someone needs to make a snag proof box for these fuckin little "harmless" cameras! >:(



This had noting to do with it being snag proof or not.
It's about awareness.
Know how you can activate someones reserve...
But this can also happen with a ContourHD, Sony, hand or foot.
That's why many people opt for soft handles. They make a trade off between a snag proof reseve handle, of an easier pull.
"The 'perfect' parachute jump was thought to be one where the opening shock and touchdown were simultaneous" -Lyle Cameron, ~1965
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Falling-With-Style.com

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THANK you..


Would this have happened with a soft reserve?



Most likely not. Although I have to wonder if the reserve handle was dislodged before it was caught on the GoPro. If it was seated properly and there were 3 inches of 3/4 inch velcro holding the thing in place, I'd expect the GoPro to bend a little, or the guy's head to be yanked as the velcro was getting ripped apart.

Edit: I guess not. It looks seated, but it's a pretty big handle. I'm going to have to get a GoPro and see if I can get it in my smaller D-ring.

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Guns dont kill people.......


Clearly not the camera fault.... Why are they trying blame the product (sure things can be done to make better), but its not its fault!
BAD set up. FF with silver is a no no with lots of people.

EDUCATE THE PEOPLE

Take some f(*&(*& responsibility PEOPLE

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BAD set up. FF with silver is a no no with lots of people.



So if you have a soft reserve handle, you're telling me it's OK to shove my top mounted camera helmet into your handle before exit? That's what it sounds like.

Let's be clear on a few things - no matter what sort of handle you have on any part of your rig, do not let anyone grab or place a body part on or in the vicinity of that handle. Soft, d-ring or loop, it does not matter. Keep hands and anyting away from them.

Extremities are for grips, end of story. Arms and legs, and if you can't make it work with those grips, then make another plan. No type of handle is fool-proof, so don't jump with a fool who thinks it's OK, or neccesary to 'get up in your business'.

As to the GoPro issue, is certainly is an issue. Before the Gopro, camera helmets were that much more expensive, that much heavier, and more prohibitive for jumping on every jump. Yes, camera technology and camera flying mentality has been heading this way for year, but the GoPro has really pushed the 'POV' idea of camera flying over the edge, and the number of people jumping cameras for no other reason than 'just because' has gone up sharply.

How does this relates? Why the hell would the base of a tube dive wear a camera? What sort of shots are you going to be able to get, what sort of lighting and composition are you going to be able to do with a 20ft tube trailing off your foot? The answer is obvious, but never the less, the camera was there and in interfered in the jump in a big way.

All involved were LUCKY that things turned out how they did. A slight error in exit timing could have put that PC or reserve right into another jumper.

Everyone claims they'll just 'turn it on and forget about it', well, it seems that's what the base did in this instance, and that was the problem. If you're going to jump with a camera, do it right. Be aware of your equipment and what you're doing, and leave it on the ground when you're not able to give it it's due consideration.

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Again the soft reserve would have helped.



Maybe, but it doesn't fix the real problem that the jumpers were not aware of their (and others) handles.

Beyond that, a soft handle introduces more problems that are harder to fix. It's easy to tell people not to touch your handles. You have control over than, and can dirt dive and door jam scenarios that don't involve people getting close to handles.

It's not easy to control the specifics of a malfunction situation, because by definition, things are not going to plan. The location, accesability, and your avbility to grip or leverage the soft handle may be comprimised in a malfunction scenario. The rigid and looped nature of a D-ring will minimize these risks, and ensure that you have every advantage available to you when the unexpected or unplanned should happen.

People who argue that soft handles avoid snags are looking at it backwards. You want a handle you can snag when you need it, and when you don't, structure your activites to protect your handles. It's basic skydiving, and looking at it the other way is bastardizing the process.

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Guns dont kill people.......


Clearly not the camera fault.... Why are they trying blame the product (sure things can be done to make better), but its not its fault!
BAD set up. FF with silver is a no no with lots of people.

EDUCATE THE PEOPLE

Take some f(*&(*& responsibility PEOPLE




yep
*I am not afraid of dying... I am afraid of missing life.*
----Disclaimer: I don't know shit about skydiving.----

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>Again the soft reserve would have helped.

True, it may have.

But if you get a reserve pulled in freefall you end up under a reserve. If you need to pull your reserve but cannot you end up dead. Is that worth the tradeoff? Maybe, maybe not. Personally, being able to easily open my reserve when I need to, even with thick gloves, or after getting hit hard, or if the handle is soaking wet, or with a broken hand, outweighs the risk of someone opening my reserve with their Gopro. (And to reduce the odds of _that_, just avoid jumping with people with Gopros.)

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But if you get a reserve pulled in freefall you end up under a reserve. If you need to pull your reserve but cannot you end up dead. Is that worth the tradeoff? Maybe, maybe not.



I know some camera jumpers who go for a soft handle because they spend most of their jumping lives climbing around aircraft doorways out on to the camera step. While they take care not to snag their handle on anything, the risk with a D handle is higher. If they had the reserve deploy and hook over the tail of the plane, they, the plane and potentially everyone in it could be royally fucked. You pays your money and you makes your choice.

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I think I found a pretty good snag-free solution to fly a small hd camera; Let me know what you think:
Doesnt work with an HD Pro, but it will work with a flip or sony bloggie or even a smart phone.
Buy one of the jogging cases that people strap ipods to their upper arms with. Cut it down so it straps tight to the inside of your left wrist with the lens facing the same way as your palm. Cut a small 1/4" dia hole for the lens to see through. If you wear a jumpsuit with the elastic wristbands, slide the sleeve over the bottom part of the strapped-on camera to the point where it doesnt obstruct the lens.
This setup is as impossible to snag as it gets; The altimeter on the back of your hand is 10 times as likely to be a problem.
It also faces the ground in a box, and a slight twist of your wrist will let you sneak in a quick mug.
Under canopy, the images is rotated 90 degrees with your arms raised to the toggles, but still very easy and natural to have aimed forward or turn left and right. You just need to rotate the image afterwards in movie maker or whatever video editing software you have.
(Of course I would never jump this with my lack of experience)
-XTO

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