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adrenalinejunki

breathing during freefall

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I make a point every jump to see if I breathe in freefall, but I keep forgetting to remember....what was I talking about?:P




LOL, hmmm, there wouldn't happen to be anything special IN those deep breaths would there?



My Karma ran over my Dogma!!!

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I am the same way! I feel like I am suffocating if I have strong wind blowing in my face. I really noticed the problem on my first tandem in Hawaii, I was not at all nervous but I could not breathe due to the force of the wind in my face. I tried an indoor skydiving flight recently and had the same problem; it's definitely not anxiety, it's something physical...narrow sinuses maybe. I have the same trouble breathing when I put my face in front of a strong fan too. So glad I'm not the only one!

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I know what you mean. I felt it when I was walking my dog the other day and some strong winds came up and blew into my face. I couldn't breath. I searched for the best way to face the wind, and found that breathing trough your mouth like you're jawning is the best answer. I feel the same with fans too. But when I went indoor skydiving I had no trouble at all. If someone could explain, that would be great.:|
From 0 to 12.000 in 9 minutes

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When I was younger and not very bright (same condition now, only older) I used to ride my motorcycle at (well) over 100 miles per hour for say 30 minutes at a time (or until fuel ran out.) Most of us did not have full face helmets, and I know for sure I can not hold my breath that long. I know you can breathe at speed if you relax. The wind tunnel sounds like a good de-sensitizer to me too.

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I am the same way! I feel like I am suffocating if I have strong wind blowing in my face. I really noticed the problem on my first tandem in Hawaii, I was not at all nervous but I could not breathe due to the force of the wind in my face. I tried an indoor skydiving flight recently and had the same problem; it's definitely not anxiety, it's something physical...narrow sinuses maybe. I have the same trouble breathing when I put my face in front of a strong fan too. So glad I'm not the only one!


I've felt the "I can't breathe in freefall/high winds" twice. Once on one of my AFF jumps (I had to repeat the level because I was so distracted that I didn't pull on time. D'oh!)
The only other time this happened was about 25 years ago, when I was on a beach on a very windy day. I was going to add "...so I don't think nerves caused it," but then I remembered I was at the beach watching a terrible pier fire, so I suppose my brain was in "holy $#!+!!" mode at that time too.
Other than that I haven't had any problems. :)
My blog with the skydiving duck cartoons.

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it's definitely not anxiety, it's something physical...



It may not be anxiety, but it's not something physical! Well, maybe not in the way you're thinking.

What you are feeling is actually pretty common. Some combination of pressure on your face, noise, vibration... is tricking your nervous system, and you are reflexively holding your breath. Like a lot of reflexes though, it can be overcome.

If it happens in front of a fan, then that's actually good news - you can sit in front of a fan and teach yourself to breathe there, without having to shell out for a wind tunnel like someone else I know did :)
(Wish I'd thought to get them to try that.)
--
"I'll tell you how all skydivers are judged, . They are judged by the laws of physics." - kkeenan

"You jump out, pull the string and either live or die. What's there to be good at?

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Like you I get nervous before jumping and find myself almost pumping myself up...I usually just start doing a nice long in through the nose out through the mouth steady pace.. some good deep breaths and by the time the green light is on and time to climb out I've forgotten all about it..


Try it in free fall.. in through the nose out thru the mouth controlled and you will find how much it helps to relax
Millions of my potential children died on your daughters' face last night.

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Sometimes, especially on tandems, the student will take a huge gulp inwards from fear, nervousness, whatever it may me.. Then 3 seconds later in freefall they're trying to take a breathe in not knowing their lungs have been at full capacity. They just need to breathe out, so a useful tip is simply to scream!

However, after reading that you even have problems in front of an air conditioner? That's a problem, and I don't know what to tell you. How much of an adrenaline junkie can you be if you can't breathe?:S
Stay high pull low

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Please don't skydive or ride a motorcycle again until you can figure out a way to breathe.

Go see a bunch of doctors if you can't figure this one out on your own.



+1

An Adrenaline Junkie who can't breathe when a little bit of adrenaline comes into play might need some new hobbies?

:S:S

***********************************************
I'm NOT totally useless... I can be used as a bad example

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May be worth looking up hyperventilation. Some people when over excited tend to take shallow gasping breaths which results in too much carbon dioxide being expelled. This can get you into a breathing cycle that continues to deplete your carbon dioxide. If you think this might be the problem, find a safe situation that causes the problem and try breathing in and out into a paper bag for a couple of minutes (or even cup your hands over your mouth). By rebreathing expelled breath you up the carbon dioxide level. If that improves things then you should be able to solve the problem by improving your breathing pattern BEFORE as well as during the jump.
Anne

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When fast gas passes slow gas (in lungs) it tends to try to pull it along, creating a small under pressure which gives this sensation of not being able to breathe.

I experienced this on my first aff jump, got the tip of closing my huge mouth and to breathe normally through my nose. Not had a problem since.

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