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JohnRich

That "droppy" feeling

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I've never felt "that droppy feeling" when leaving the aircraft. The only time I have during the jump is when releasing a strong flare under canaopy (high up, not for landing) and when you then surge forward it feels like that.

I haven't done any BASE jumps but I have jumped from high bridges into deep water, and I most certainly felt it then.

There you go. That matches what I've been saying. :)
Wait until you have that first cutaway. It's sweet. B|

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2. Zero airspeed equals zero airspeed.



That statement is axiomatic and rhetorically redundant. From an existentially ontological standpoint there are no dichotomous of duality that provide the necessary categorical perceptive boundaries of the neural correlates of consciousness of the connotative and denotative definitions of "zero airspeed"... A phrased or idiom mapped directly back onto itself provides little literary or linguistic value, and ceases to carry forward the sort of meaning, function and purpose of translation and/or reduction of consciousness as it may have originally been intended.

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That statement is axiomatic and rhetorically redundant. From an existentially ontological standpoint there are no dichotomous of duality that provide the necessary categorical perceptive boundaries of the neural correlates of consciousness of the connotative and denotative definitions of "zero airspeed"... A phrased or idiom mapped directly back onto itself provides little literary or linguistic value, and ceases to carry forward the sort of meaning, function and purpose of translation and/or reduction of consciousness as it may have originally been intended.



That's exactly what I was going to say!

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When we were kids we'd jump off the top of a railroad tressle into the water. You could really feel that awful falling feeling.

When I made my first five jumps in the army I never felt any of that. The first was out of a 141. There was tremendous wind, first step out of the door. The next four jumps were out of 119's which flew a lot slower. Later we jumped everything from C-130's to choppers....still no falling sensation.

Skydiving I've never felt this either. This includes two cut aways. Maybe you do get used to it over time.

I'm wondering about base jumping. You would think that surely they would feel this sensation, or bungee jumpers. I've always wondered about this....

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3. Zero gravity is achieved only when the centrifugal force on a mass offsets the gravitational attraction to it.


Robin, I woke up this morning thinking about all this. I think you're confusing "being under the influence of gravity" with actually experiencing a
G force. The Earth, and every other body in the universe, have gravity fields that extend outward towards infinity. Sure, the effect decreases with the square of the distance, but the Earth's gravitational pull goes well past orbital altitudes. Being weightless, or zero G, does not require you be free of gravity. just that you not resist it.

Imagine a G meter the size and shape of a baseball sitting on a table on Earth. It will register 1 G. Pick it up and toss it into the air. As your hand accelerates it upwards, it will register several G's. As soon as it leaves your hand and stops accelerating upwards, the G meter will go to zero (discounting the slight drag of air resistance.) It will stay at zero as the ball completes its arc and starts falling back to Earth. When you catch it, the G meter will once again register high positive G's. Once your hand comes to a stop, it will register 1 G again, same as resting on the table. Do you agree with this model?

It's possible your extensive base jumping has desensitized you to feeling unusual during low-to-zero G moments. Astronauts in orbit adapt to weightlessness, soon feeling very comfortable in that environment. Some do report bouts of space sickness, though. I'm saying they're getting that "droppy" feeling. :)

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It's possible your extensive base jumping has desensitized you to feeling unusual during low-to-zero G moments. Astronauts in orbit adapt to weightlessness, soon feeling very comfortable in that environment. Some do report bouts of space sickness, though. I'm saying they're getting that "droppy" feeling. :)



I would say yes.

On my first ballonjump the feeling was insane.
My body was screaming!

On my second ballon jump, there was less of this feeling.
On the third, I feelt nothing. Or very little

And the same thing when I BASE, I feel something of a falling but not anything close to the feeling of my first ballon.

I think you can get used to the feeling

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On my first ballonjump the feeling was insane.
My body was screaming!

On my second ballon jump, there was less of this feeling.
On the third, I feelt nothing. Or very little

And the same thing when I BASE, I feel something of a falling but not anything close to the feeling of my first ballon.

I think you can get used to the feeling



"My body was screaming" pretty much describes the first few seconds of my first jump (mentioned earlier in the thread). Thank heavens it wasn't out of a balloon. I'd probably be screaming to this day.:o:$

That being said, I agree it's something you get used to. Another example, if I get back on a rollercoaster I've just ridden, the second ride isn't as thrilling/scary as the first.
My blog with the skydiving duck cartoons.

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A phrased or idiom mapped directly back onto itself provides little literary or linguistic value, and ceases to carry forward the sort of meaning, function and purpose of translation and/or reduction of consciousness as it may have originally been intended.



It is what it is.

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2. Zero airspeed equals zero airspeed.



That statement is axiomatic and rhetorically redundant. From an existentially ontological standpoint there are no dichotomous of duality that provide the necessary categorical perceptive boundaries of the neural correlates of consciousness of the connotative and denotative definitions of "zero airspeed"... A phrased or idiom mapped directly back onto itself provides little literary or linguistic value, and ceases to carry forward the sort of meaning, function and purpose of translation and/or reduction of consciousness as it may have originally been intended.



My gosh, I wish I could talk like that. I was wondering if you know how close a fly comes to a ceiling before it turns over to land?

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I have never got it skydiving (caravans only at this stage) now I think of it. I think physics would come into play when jumping from a moving vs static object but alot of it i believe is alos a mental reaction to the acceleration. I mean even at theme parks I dont get that loosing your guts feeling anymore, even on rides that intend to do just that...such as the giant drop here in Aus (http://www.dreamworld.com.au/Rides/Thrill-Rides/The-Giant-Drop.aspx). I mean I still feel the acceleration, but it doesn't trigger that "I left my stomach up there feeling".

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...but because earth does have air and atmosphere what effectively happens is after a few seconds of "falling" (or rather approximate "free falling") the velocity increases to a certain amount whereby the friction caused by the air molecules rubbing along the surface area of the skydiver starts to impede his otherwise constant rate of increasing downward velocity and exponential rate of altitude loss.... and the frictional forces continues to get stronger until it completely counteracts and balances out and cancels out the effects of gravity acc forces on his body.



You're on the right track for most of your posts, but if you're going to go into that much detail, you can't expect to get away with statements like the above. Drag is not the same thing as friction and drag is the dominant resistive force given the airspeeds and object shapes we're talking about. Drag is caused by the creation of high pressure and low pressure zones around a body as it passes through a medium.

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You do get "rollercoaster stomach" on a rollercoaster because as you go from 1 G to zero G, the urine in your bladder stays where it is in space while your body moves downward through that same space -- causing the top of your bladder to collide with the floating urine, thus causing that tingly "droppy" feeling routinely mis-identified as being in your stomach.



Any vessel filled with fluid/objects of varying density can act as a g-meter so whether your stomach or bladder dominates the sensations in your abdomen depends on how recently you've eaten and how dehydrated you are. But neither is as sensitive to fluid movement as your cochlea, that's its whole purpose.

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I have never got it skydiving (caravans only at this stage) now I think of it. I think physics would come into play when jumping from a moving vs static object but alot of it i believe is alos a mental reaction to the acceleration. I mean even at theme parks I dont get that loosing your guts feeling anymore, even on rides that intend to do just that...such as the giant drop here in Aus (http://www.dreamworld.com.au/Rides/Thrill-Rides/The-Giant-Drop.aspx). I mean I still feel the acceleration, but it doesn't trigger that "I left my stomach up there feeling".



the reason you don't get rollercoaster stomach even on rollercoasters is that you may lean forward into the dive rather than leaning back. When you do that, it changes the centrifugal force vector away from your head toward your back, so the urine hits the back of your bladder instead of the top, which is common in normal life so it becomes background noise, so to speak.

44
B|
SCR-6933 / SCS-3463 / D-5533 / BASE 44 / CCS-37 / 82d Airborne (Ret.)

"The beginning of wisdom is to first call things by their right names."

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Drag is not the same thing as friction and drag is the dominant resistive force given the airspeeds and object shapes we're talking about.


Yes and no. When most people learn about fluid dynamics, the easiest way to get them to visualize what viscosity means is to treat it as 'air friction.' In a literal sense, that's exactly what it is, fluid molecules interacting with each other. However, most people consider 'friction' to be skin friction when talking aerodynamics, and let induced drag be its own thing, as you've done.

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Drag is caused by the creation of high pressure and low pressure zones around a body as it passes through a medium.


Strictly speaking, it's the other way around.

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Agh, this thread screwed up my jump yesterday! I did a hop'n'pop from a 182. I can't remember the last time I went unstable on exit but yesterday I was 100% focussed on the droppy feeling (which I didn't feel) on a dive exit b - I just remember seeing the plane under my left arm and thinking "oops thats not a good exit" :)
Experienced jumper - someone who has made mistakes more often than I have and lived.

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Drag is caused by the creation of high pressure and low pressure zones around a body as it passes through a medium.


Strictly speaking, it's the other way around.



My "caused by the creation of" language was pretty terrible, sorry about that.

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I'm a complete newbie, two jumps. You can read about them in the Introductions forum. And I realize that I'm extremely limited in my experience, so I'm not trying to sound authoritative or anything like that, but I absolutely, 100% did get the "droppy" feeling on both of my jumps. Exactly like I was on a roller coaster or however you want to describe it. It didn't last long, only a few seconds, tops, but no doubt it was there. Maybe it's a subjective thing. Determined by individual physiology or something.

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I'm a complete newbie, two jumps. You can read about them in the Introductions forum. And I realize that I'm extremely limited in my experience, so I'm not trying to sound authoritative or anything like that, but I absolutely, 100% did get the "droppy" feeling on both of my jumps. Exactly like I was on a roller coaster or however you want to describe it. It didn't last long, only a few seconds, tops, but no doubt it was there. Maybe it's a subjective thing. Determined by individual physiology or something.



Having now read the entire thread and thinking back on my two measly semesters of college physics, it's probably all about the speed of the aircraft, and subsequently your horizontal speed, as you leave the plane. I'm just going to shut up now.

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Having now read the entire thread and thinking back on my two measly semesters of college physics, it's probably all about the speed of the aircraft, and subsequently your horizontal speed, as you leave the plane. I'm just going to shut up now.

Aw, don't shut up. You didn't say anything stupid.

Welcome to skydiving, BTW. :)

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I'm a complete newbie, two jumps. You can read about them in the Introductions forum.


Your post contains 712 words, I find it insulting, the number I mean :P

1st jump "droppy feeling" made me think I'm dead. That's why I say "Brave men die 1000 times, chicken brains only once"
What goes around, comes later.

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I don't know how many people have tried this before but it definitely gives you the “droppy” feeling. The next time you are at a swimming pool stand right at the edge of the pool with your toes hanging over the water.(Look around and check to see that there are no hot babes watching you) then bend your legs slightly, put your arms between your legs and grab your ankles so that the palms of your hands are over your Achilles tendons. Close your eyes and rock forward into the water without changing position. You should tumble head first as you enter the water and land up sinking with your back to the floor of the pool.

There isn't much acceleration in this just a large amount of dis-orientation.

:$First post on DZ.com but not a licensed skydiver yet:( (-1000 man points) still working on that!

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