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shah269

Guys Gals! You can fix this right?

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In a way they were. The 12’ cross form deployed at apogee…..and the whole rocket rode it down to around 2,000 feet and the 2 R-4’s deployed. I used the cross form just to get it to a lower altitude so the uppers would not blow it out of sight. It topped out at over 30,000 feet.

Sparky



Was it one deployment bag or two? (or two sewn together?)
"I may be a dirty pirate hooker...but I'm not about to go stand on the corner." iluvtofly
DPH -7, TDS 578, Muff 5153, SCR 14890
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In a way they were. The 12’ cross form deployed at apogee…..and the whole rocket rode it down to around 2,000 feet and the 2 R-4’s deployed. I used the cross form just to get it to a lower altitude so the uppers would not blow it out of sight. It topped out at over 30,000 feet.

Sparky



Was it one deployment bag or two? (or two sewn together?)



The rounds were in 2 separate bags and deployed lines first like on a direct bag deployment. The cross form was deployed by an explosive charge blowing the nose cone off and dragging the bagged canopy with it.

The hard part was building to 2 rounds. I hadn't done one in quite a few years.:P

Sparky
My idea of a fair fight is clubbing baby seals

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OK i'm going to be retarded here and just ask the question.
If the NASA design worked so well....why reinvent the wheel when it comes to a safety device?
Life through good thoughts, good words, and good deeds is necessary to ensure happiness and to keep chaos at bay.

The only thing that falls from the sky is birdshit and fools!

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Are both landing canopies attached to the same riser? I suspect that part of your problem is that when the capsule tumbles, it pulls the different risers/bridles to different lengths, which means that the two landing canopies deploy at different times (the differences being the length of the risers).

When one landing canopy is forced to absorb all of a high-speed inflation, it over-loads and burns.
If you can adjust riser/bridle length so that both landing canopies inflate at the same time, you reduce the opening shock on any single canopy.

Maybe you need a three or four legged bridle to reduce capsule tumbling (ala. Ballistic Recovery System).
You might also need to sew on "aprons" - between the risers - to prevent the capsule from tumbling through the risers ... like some ejection seats.

Another solution would be a larger drogue, to further reduce terminal velocity, before deploying either landing canopy. Remember that opening shock increases with the square of the velocity, The lower the velocity at (landing canopy) deployment time, the less damage.

IOW You can get away with a lot of mistakes as long as you keep wing-loadings and airspeeds low.
Just look at the Wright Brothers!
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