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Viper3197

Parents With Young Children

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Statistically speaking you have a 1 in 50 chance of not living to see a 2 year old's college graduation



Where did you get that statistic?

I'm not flaming, just curious.

I often have these types of conversations with people and having real numbers like that is hard because I'm not aware of reliable, centralized stats.

If you know of a resource I'd really be interested in checking it out

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One thing to think about is that many of the people who will give you advice were skydiving before they became parents. In some cases, they were performing at an "expert" level (1000+ jumps) before trying to find a balance.

This is my third year in the sport and I only have a little over 300 jumps. I also have a six month old.

The thing about getting into the sport is that it tends to be consuming. You are going through a level of progression and learning that is the fastest it will ever be in the sport. Your jump/reward ratio is huge. It seems like every ten or twenty jumps you are passing a major milestone and that makes you want to just keep jumping jumping jumping.

With no kids, you can easily blow off all your old friends, spend all your time and money jumping, and get deep into the sport quick.

For some people after that first bit they drop off and you never see them again.

For others, they keep that pace.

But for you, none of that is an option. Unless you have an inconceivably cool spouse and you don't mind spending zero time with your kids.

If that isn't in the deck, then I would caution you that you will probably become very frustrated at certain points. I know I did.

You will want to jump from sun up to sun down and you won't be able to. The people you got licensed with will surpass you in skills, leaving you behind. You will have to accept that something someone else picks up in two or three months will take you the entire year.

For people who have been jumping a lot already, it's easier to slow down.

But the rush of being a new jumper is something entirely different.

So in addition to thinking about risk and money, think about how your own head works. If you can deal with limitations and are ok with slow plodding progression, then by all means go for it. I got in 40 jumps this summer, and i'm fine with it.

But if you are the type of person that gets into the groove of something and you can't put it down without sucking the life out of it, then it might be a frustrating experience.

just my two cents. everyone is different and you have to make that decision for yourself. i would encourage you to keep investigating and if it were me i'd do it. but don't be under any illusions that it won't be hard.

but then again, you are a parent with a toddler. this has nothing on surviving fatherhood. B|

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I just wanted to thank everyone for sharing their experiences and/or thoughts on the subject. It sounds like I have a lot to think about and that there are many things which I hadn't considered. I'm also interested in learning more about how you can make the sport safer as many of you have mentioned, I/E: different equipment, different styles, etc. Perhaps with a little more education on the subject I can get a better understanding.

If not now, I know it's something I'll want to do in the future. We'll see. Thanks again

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Wow. [:/] Do you treat potential/new jumpers that rudely in person, or is this just a manifestation of your online persona?

BTW, [sarcasm] Nice "first" post.[/sarcasm] If you are tired of answering the same questions, don't bother.
lisa
WSCR 594
FB 1023
CBDB 9

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I started skydiving before my boys were born, kept flying and skydiving after they were born, my oldest now skydives and my youngest may or may not when he gets old enough, my youngest does want to get his pilots license though.
Experience is a difficult teacher, she gives you the test first and the lesson afterward

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