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dpfire29

How often does line twist happen in student jumps

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How often linetwists occur in student jumps is largely dependent on the type of jump being done. In AFF, you get the occasional linetwist. For certain types of static-line jumps, you get 1-in-3ish chances of linetwists.

Linetwists on student-type canopies are not that big a deal and you will be taught how to deal with them in your first jump course. Don't sweat it.

ciel bleu,
Saskia

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On my second IAD I had one line twist because I didn't arch (long story, learned my lesson) and it untwisted itself. With AFF you deploy higher so you have a longer time to fix your problem.

Though don't worry too much about malfunctions or you'll freak yourself out like I did. :) enjoy it!

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thanks for the info, i have been spoiled by doing tandoms into thinking being stable will be no problem, but i no diffrent. really just trying to learn all i can because what i have experienced so far is just to addicting, love this sport just dont want to leave behind three kids doing it. thanks again

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With AFF you deploy higher so you have a longer time to fix your problem.



That statement might be misleading for newbs... In AFF, you're falling at terminal. Static lines open lower because they never reach terminal (they are falling slower). EP working time might not be much different. Both methods are designed to give students ample time to deal with EP's, especially line twists.

Line twists are a simple problem to correct for. Don't sweat them, just go make a skydive and report back... have fun. :)
Birdshit & Fools Productions

"Son, only two things fall from the sky."

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I never had one in AFF. I've had a couple since then, neither one very bad. They're easy to deal with, and not really a big deal at all.

One of our AFFs today had a line-over and had to cut away on his checkout jump. Now that'll get the ol' heart pumpin'!
I'm trying to teach myself how to set things on fire with my mind. Hey... is it hot in here?

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It depends. On a freefall jump they don't happen too often. On IAD or static line they happen more. On a Direct Bag Static Line they happen a lot.

With rare exception, they aren't a major issue during student jumps. You should be high enough when you open that you have plenty of altitude to kick out of them and student canopies are big and docile. You won't go into a diving spin because of them like you would under a small, high performance canopy.

Getting out of them is not a big deal either. You kick and twist your body, along with reaching up and pushing the risers together and you will spin right out of them.

Make sure you discuss this with your instructors so that they can answer any questions or concerns you have.
"There are NO situations which do not call for a French Maid outfit." Lucky McSwervy

"~ya don't GET old by being weak & stupid!" - Airtwardo

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This question came up a couple of times already. I can say based on my own experience, if a linetwist or even a couple of twists happening on a student canopy...THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO FEAR! After 5 or 10 seconds you're out of any possible twist.

There are a few other malfunctions you have to take serious. A linetwist on a student canopy is NOT a malfunction.

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Line twists occur as a result of asymmetrical body position, specifically when you drop a shoulder. This causes the air to spiral above you and when the bag is caught is the spiral you get bag rotation and line twists. The first rule of deployment is to keep your shoulders parallel to the ground. It is difficult to look over your shoulder and keep your shoulders level to the ground. That is why I teach; look up over your head to clear a burble or check your pilot chute.

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It usually comes from not arching your body until you pull, which causes you to slowly turn, winding up the lines as they deploy.

I careless grab at the pilot chute would also allow the same thing.

REMEDY: Concentrate on getting the pilot chute and staying stable, not turning as you reach for it.

Be aware of your body, watch to see if you are beginning a turn as you reach.




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You've already got plenty of good answers but I'll tell you a little story.

I had line twists for 25 of my first 28 jumps. I was a spinner. Jump 29 the spinning and the line twists stopped and I have no clue as to what exactly made it stop.

The first 2 were S/L and the third was a 5-second delay....after that? Let's Twist Again, Like we did Last Summer.
:D:D

I got to be an expert at getting out of line twists.
;)
:D:D
My reality and yours are quite different.
I think we're all Bozos on this bus.
Falcon5232, SCS8170, SCSA353, POPS9398, DS239

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You've already got plenty of good answers but I'll tell you a little story.

I had line twists for 25 of my first 28 jumps. I was a spinner. Jump 29 the spinning and the line twists stopped and I have no clue as to what exactly made it stop.

The first 2 were S/L and the third was a 5-second delay....after that? Let's Twist Again, Like we did Last Summer.
:D:D

I got to be an expert at getting out of line twists.
;)
:D:D



You figured out you needed to put BOTH legstraps on :o:D
Experienced jumper - someone who has made mistakes more often than I have and lived.

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I have a few line twists as a student and some afterwards as well. It seems your question has some concern or worry behind it.

For me, flying a student rig, I would find myself hanging under a perfectly inflated and properly flying canopy. I would do a quick look around to see if there was someone headed for me. After I knew I was in the in clear, I knew I could relax a bit. Students should be open high enough that you have time to fix a line twist and still make it back to your landing area without a problem. Unless something else is also wrong, there is not a lot of reason to get excited about a line twist.

You can kick your way out of a line twist and that is good practice. If you are flying straight without any spinning, if you just wait a few seconds, very often it will just untwist like you are on a twisted up swing.
Instructor quote, “What's weird is that you're older than my dad!”

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Like they all said, at your stage it is all about symmetrical body position during deployment.

I will add this though: as you continue through your progression and begin packing for yourself, make sure you leave the proper amount of excess line between the last line stow and the risers. Too little line has shown to have a tendency to delay line stretch and the bag can get caught in your burble and rotate before continuing on its way.
"Are you coming to the party?
Oh I'm coming, but I won't be there!"
Flying Hellfish #828
Dudist #52

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I had one on student gear...jump 40ish before I had my own stuff. None since. Line twists were my one big fear during my student progression and a bit afterwards. Total nigt sweats Dunno why. When I finally had them the training kicked in and it was no big deal.

Good luck on your progression. :)

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