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SecondRound

Log Book question: What's the right thing to do?

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I am returning to skydiving after a bit of a layoff. I still have my old jump record from from previous training. Two issues, first of all, the last entry is dated 11/13/77 and says OK for FF. Secondly the card is in two pieces and looks like an ancient relic.
Is there any value in transferring the entries to a new real logbook and is there anything that would maintain the integrity of my log book entries like keeping a good copy of the original. It is not like I plan to only make 19 jumps before applying for my A license, but darn it I did make those jumps and I want them to be in my jump history. I would appreciate any advice given from those of you who are familiar with the paperwork side of the sport. Thanks

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If they are signed and you can show them the log, bring it and talk with your instructor. Jumps are jumps. You will still have to go through all of the training and pass all of the license requirements and tests but the jumps count towards your jump numbers.

Don't transfer anything. The signatures are important. I still have my first card somewhere and kept it in a log book. Start your log book with #5 or whatever it was and keep the card folded (maybe laminated?) with your book for now. Don't throw the old one away.

Welcome back!


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I am returning to skydiving after a bit of a layoff. I still have my old jump record from from previous training. Two issues, first of all, the last entry is dated 11/13/77 and says OK for FF. Secondly the card is in two pieces and looks like an ancient relic.
Is there any value in transferring the entries to a new real logbook and is there anything that would maintain the integrity of my log book entries like keeping a good copy of the original. It is not like I plan to only make 19 jumps before applying for my A license, but darn it I did make those jumps and I want them to be in my jump history. I would appreciate any advice given from those of you who are familiar with the paperwork side of the sport. Thanks

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If you want to keep it in your new logbook, you can get a plastic sleeve that fits (like the kind for picture albums -- remember those?) and tape that into your new logbook.

Wendy P.
There is nothing more dangerous than breaking a basic safety rule and getting away with it. It removes fear of the consequences and builds false confidence. (tbrown)

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If for nothing else they are good to remember "back when".

I had no layoff but I started with a small student log book. I photo copied the pages and pasted them over the first few blank pages of my new/larger log book so I would not have to carry the old one around as I finsihed my student work.
Instructor quote, “What's weird is that you're older than my dad!”

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I log all my stuff into a notebook, which several people have commented on. Most of them seem to like the idea. I keep the cheesy $1.50 log book they gave me at the start of AFF in a pocket of the notebook.

Maybe also scan your old log and post it online somewhere!
I'm trying to teach myself how to set things on fire with my mind. Hey... is it hot in here?

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the last entry is dated 11/13/77



Welcome back! Your re-currency training should be a breeze.... nothing has changed since then! ;)B|

Be safe, have fun.



Except maybe the gear. :P
"Mediocre people don't like high achievers, and high achievers don't like mediocre people." - SIX TIME National Champion coach Nick Saban

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I am returning to skydiving after a bit of a layoff. I still have my old jump record from from previous training. Two issues, first of all, the last entry is dated 11/13/77 and says OK for FF. Secondly the card is in two pieces and looks like an ancient relic.
Is there any value in transferring the entries to a new real logbook and is there anything that would maintain the integrity of my log book entries like keeping a good copy of the original. It is not like I plan to only make 19 jumps before applying for my A license, but darn it I did make those jumps and I want them to be in my jump history. I would appreciate any advice given from those of you who are familiar with the paperwork side of the sport. Thanks



I could care less about keeping a log. But too each his own... I see guys log every damn thing down and even after thousands of jumps still cant land on two feet... Maybe abit more focus on skydiving instead of drawing little jumpers in log books :)

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:)
"I did make those jumps and I want them to be in my jump history."

That is so awesome!!!

Diddto the "welcome back"

A related experience of mine; an exwife is involved, and more than a few round jumps...

I'm sure like many of my most prized possesions, and my most prized,...well really my most important things in life, my children were trashed by this person.

I was able to find my first jump ceertificate cir 1974 with a small collection of "jump tickets." I was able to find an aff logbook from the 80s' , decided to take the course, figured the right thing to do... but alas my real log book was trashed. Upon the advice of a local DZ, I did travel somewhat after my divorce , I was able to reconstruct some of the dates of some jumps, from invoices and charge card bills, etc.

So I reconstructed half or so of the number of jumps I have, I tell others when asked I have about 80 jumps cause my rw skills suck in comparison to the real number of jumps. A large part of skydiving is expecting others to be able to do certian things and a big piece of information many use is the question: "How many jumps do you have."? So when I said I have this many jumps, (rounds, and I no longer answer this question honestly... rounds and that kind of experience is valuable, just not in a flying wing world...) Anyways my new logbook reflects the ability of an average student at 80 jumps, (I hung around one day and watched a bunch of students(?) doing four ways, and I had to doctor my log as best I could, but I did enter jump number one in my book! and there it stays!

Now, as health permits, I work on, as DSE says, being the personal best that I can be! Every jump is cherished.

Good luck, stay safe, do yo have any requestests about retaking the aff course? Cause I have a bunch of favortie instructors that I want to advertise!!!
But what do I know, "I only have one tandem jump."

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I could care less about keeping a log. But too each his own... I see guys log every damn thing down and even after thousands of jumps still cant land on two feet... Maybe abit more focus on skydiving instead of drawing little jumpers in log books :)



I feel a little sorry for you, because I think that when you are really old and cranky, one of the few remaining joys will not be available to you, that of going through you old logbooks. It is hard for me to imagine that a facet of my life as important and formative as skydiving is not worth documenting.

As you say, to each his own, but I think you will regret it. Even the mundane can become important in retrospect. I have logged every jump, and I wish I had written more.

-- Jeff
My Skydiving History

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Jeff!!!!!!!!!!

That is a totally friging awsome site! You have an Idea of what I would pay to find some old pictures and etc from my past!!!!

I wish I was as lucky to have been able to capture those memories!!! Awe :)C
But what do I know, "I only have one tandem jump."

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I feel a little sorry for you



And I feel a little sorry for your descendants. I think it is really cool to find stuff my grandfather wrote. Imagine 50 years from now when nobody writes anything anymore. Even today logbooks are becoming electronic. You are not only depriving your doddering old self some memories, you may be depriving some yet unborn great-grandchild. They may enjoy it (or sell it on some future Ebay).

I log everything - draw pretty pictures -print and staple photos in the log, and get everything signed.
For the same reason I jump off a perfectly good diving board.

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And I feel a little sorry for your descendants. I think it is really cool to find stuff my grandfather wrote. Imagine 50 years from now when nobody writes anything anymore. Even today logbooks are becoming electronic. You are not only depriving your doddering old self some memories, you may be depriving some yet unborn great-grandchild. They may enjoy it (or sell it on some future Ebay).

I log everything - draw pretty pictures -print and staple photos in the log, and get everything signed.



Far too much time on your hands...... Sleep, Jump, Land (repeat as many times as possible) - Beer, Sleep ;)

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And I feel a little sorry for your descendants. I think it is really cool to find stuff my grandfather wrote. Imagine 50 years from now when nobody writes anything anymore. Even today logbooks are becoming electronic. You are not only depriving your doddering old self some memories, you may be depriving some yet unborn great-grandchild. They may enjoy it (or sell it on some future Ebay).

I log everything - draw pretty pictures -print and staple photos in the log, and get everything signed.



Far too much time on your hands...... Sleep, Jump, Land (repeat as many times as possible) - Beer, Sleep ;)



Ahhhh! The hubris of youth. [:/]
lisa
WSCR 594
FB 1023
CBDB 9

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As you say, to each his own, but I think you will regret it. Even the mundane can become important in retrospect. I have logged every jump, and I wish I had written more



I agree, to each his own, but it's very poor advice to encourage newer, or low-time jumpers not to log their jumps. Outside of their own nostalgia, the logs will provide a record of their expereince for the purpose of earning licenses, ratings, being allowed onto specialty jumps or demos, and a host of other administrative functions.

There does come a point where much of that falls by the wayside, but that's somewhere upwards of 600 jumps, where you're on the high-side for any ratings. As long as you're logged up to that point, you'll be good to go.

That said, I know several people with 2000+ jumps who still log every jump, on paper, at the end of every day. It's nothing more than a single line entry into a logbook/notebook, but it doesn't take more than a minute or two to log 8 to 10 jumps at the end of the day.

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For me, looking to get back in the air after a long layoff, the only logbook I can locate is my little blue one with my first 100 jumps. Somewhere in all the moves over the years my Precision Freefall log has been lost and I'm bummed. At first I was bummed that I have no record of a big chunk of my jumping but what disappoints me more is not having record of all the cool, interesting people I met along the way.

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I could care less about keeping a log. But too each his own... I see guys log every damn thing down and even after thousands of jumps still cant land on two feet... Maybe abit more focus on skydiving instead of drawing little jumpers in log books :)



I feel a little sorry for you, because I think that when you are really old and cranky, one of the few remaining joys will not be available to you, that of going through you old logbooks. It is hard for me to imagine that a facet of my life as important and formative as skydiving is not worth documenting.

As you say, to each his own, but I think you will regret it. Even the mundane can become important in retrospect. I have logged every jump, and I wish I had written more.



Dont feel sorry for me. I have a hot wife , lots of fast cars and a large bank account. :)

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As you say, to each his own, but I think you will regret it. Even the mundane can become important in retrospect. I have logged every jump, and I wish I had written more



I agree, to each his own, but it's very poor advice to encourage newer, or low-time jumpers not to log their jumps. Outside of their own nostalgia, the logs will provide a record of their expereince for the purpose of earning licenses, ratings, being allowed onto specialty jumps or demos, and a host of other administrative functions.

There does come a point where much of that falls by the wayside, but that's somewhere upwards of 600 jumps, where you're on the high-side for any ratings. As long as you're logged up to that point, you'll be good to go.

That said, I know several people with 2000+ jumps who still log every jump, on paper, at the end of every day. It's nothing more than a single line entry into a logbook/notebook, but it doesn't take more than a minute or two to log 8 to 10 jumps at the end of the day.



I NEVER said NOT to keep logs. I just said i really could care less. And i actually do log some. Just not every little thing that happens. But like i said. To each his own. I do agree with the looking back part , ect. But on the other hand. I have to of stories and vids and its only going to grow :/

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I'm still pissed over the logbook that got stolen and never recovered late in 1997 along with most of my gear. That one had a lot of my glory days in it. Including famous people signatures. [:/]
"Mediocre people don't like high achievers, and high achievers don't like mediocre people." - SIX TIME National Champion coach Nick Saban

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I'm still pissed over the logbook that got stolen and never recovered late in 1997 along with most of my gear. That one had a lot of my glory days in it. Including famous people signatures. [:/]

That's one of many reasons I usually keep my log book at home and write them in at the end of the day. [:/]

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I'm still pissed over the logbook that got stolen and never recovered late in 1997 along with most of my gear. That one had a lot of my glory days in it. Including famous people signatures. [:/]

That's one of many reasons I usually keep my log book at home and write them in at the end of the day. [:/]



The problem was, I was at a boogie. Finished the first day, went to motel, left gear in car because I was soooo tired. Next morning my roommate opens the door and asks me, I thought your car was right there? I take a look... FUCK. [:/]
"Mediocre people don't like high achievers, and high achievers don't like mediocre people." - SIX TIME National Champion coach Nick Saban

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