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lauril

Funniest whuffo question

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I have had people insist that skydivers in freefall can catch "thermal uprisings" and stay in the sky for prolonged periods of time while not under canopy.

Richards.
My biggest handicap is that sometimes the hole in the front of my head operates a tad bit faster than the grey matter contained within.

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I have had people insist that skydivers in freefall can catch "thermal uprisings" and stay in the sky for prolonged periods of time while not under canopy.

Richards.



Would that be all the hot air that spills out of some skydivers mouth when they brag about their latest jumps? :p

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Here's a new whuffo question you may not have heard: When freeflying head down, do you feel a blood rush to your brain the same way you feel it when upside down on the ground, against a wall? Or is it different, because you go down the same way the blood does? :|
(I'm actually interested in the answer :$)

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After viewing a couple of video's my mom wanted to know how far I went back up after opening...got a good chuckle out of that one..:)



A guy just got done doing his first tandem and was looking through parachutist. There was a picture of an exit from a helicopter. He said, "I thought you couldn't jump from a helicopter because when you open your 'chute you'll go up into the propeller."




That's a weird thought :S



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>Then I try and tell her that you don't have to pack your main
> PERFECT. I mean, I pack it and I'm FAIRLY confident that it will
> open, but I am prepared to cut it away and open my beautiful
> reserve which I KNOW will open, when I need to.

Uh, I hope this doesn't worry you too much, but reserves can mal, too. Their deployment system is a little more foolproof, but the main reason your reserve is a good thing isn't that it's much better/more reliable than your main, it's that the odds of two different canopies with two different deployment systems failing on the same jump are really low. Personally I know of four reserve mals (just reserve mals, no main/reserve entanglement) of which two were fatal.



Exactly billvon I'm no pro, or even exprienced for that matter, but I don't want to be a skydiver that looks at his main pack job and says "ah It's not perfect but it doesnt have to be because of my reserve" I want to be confident my main is going to function properly before I go to plan b.



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Well..to my knowledge its actually possible. However, its inside of a thunder cloud. The upwinds there can reach speeds around 120mph. I was told that to(..or maybe it was there) that died. They simply froze to death because they weren't loosing any altitude and got stuck in there... :(

If we only had some good thermal suits, we could have many minutes of freefall inside a cloud:)
"Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you long to return." - Da Vinci
www.lilchief.no

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In 1959, Lt. Col. William Rankin was flying at 47,000 feet when he had to eject from his F8U jet over Norfolk, Virginia due to an engine failure. He parachuted into the middle of a severe thunderstorm that carried him over 65 miles to Rich Square, North Carolina. The trip took over 40 minutes, during which all sorts of bad shit happened to him. Ineteresting story, ought to read it if you never have.


Truman Sparks for President

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My favorite was having some random guy bragging about jumping, saying he was so good that after his first jump (which was naturally an unassisted freefall with someone watching him) he was given a snowboard and encouraged to skysurf. After the locals witnessed this he was instantly made an instructor.

Of course this same gentleman also claims to have been thrown off his motorcycle going 135mph and surviving only because he managed to grab a light pole and "hang on while I spun around and around losing all that speed.":S


Truman Sparks for President

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In 1959, Lt. Col. William Rankin was flying at 47,000 feet when he had to eject from his F8U jet over Norfolk, Virginia due to an engine failure. He parachuted into the middle of a severe thunderstorm that carried him over 65 miles to Rich Square, North Carolina. The trip took over 40 minutes, during which all sorts of bad shit happened to him. Ineteresting story, ought to read it if you never have.



Not at this price!
Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. --Douglas Adams

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In 1959, Lt. Col. William Rankin was flying at 47,000 feet when he had to eject from his F8U jet over Norfolk, Virginia due to an engine failure. He parachuted into the middle of a severe thunderstorm that carried him over 65 miles to Rich Square, North Carolina. The trip took over 40 minutes, during which all sorts of bad shit happened to him. Ineteresting story, ought to read it if you never have.



Holy cow Batman!

Not at this price!

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Well then....I stand corrected. I would never have imagined that being possible. The jist of the conversation was that this guy claimed that he had heard that military specialists could jump out at high altitudes and stay aloft for an hour and cover hundreds of kilometers which sounded a wee biy hokey to me. Was the incident you described a one time incident or is that something that coud be easily replicated?

Please inform as I am now curious.

Cheers,

Richards
My biggest handicap is that sometimes the hole in the front of my head operates a tad bit faster than the grey matter contained within.

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I really don't know, but I wish I had more info on it. I was only told what I posted. you could always try if you want to B|

Did the Lt Col survie??
"Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you long to return." - Da Vinci
www.lilchief.no

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Also for cocky tandem students, Ive heard one TM scare the shit out the student by telling him he's going to disconnect him completly under canopy. Gets them to stand on his feet, undoes lower clips as normal, makes noises like hes undoing the top ones, telling the student they're not connected to anything anymore, then quickly moving their feet.

I've done over 800 hundred tandems and never had a student like that. Occasionally you can get one in the grounds school that needs a minor attitude adjustment, but I've never seen that in the air.



At my first tandem, the jumpmaster also lowered me, but I had no idea why, and what he's doeing. That was also scary...
He actually told me that at the ground, but I didn't understood it right, because english is not his mother toung and also not mine :-)

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In 1959, Lt. Col. William Rankin was flying at 47,000 feet when he had to eject from his F8U jet over Norfolk, Virginia due to an engine failure. He parachuted into the middle of a severe thunderstorm that carried him over 65 miles to Rich Square, North Carolina. The trip took over 40 minutes, during which all sorts of bad shit happened to him. Ineteresting story, ought to read it if you never have.



Holy cow Batman!

Not at this price!



Haha! I recently bought that book in a second hand shop for £2.50!

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not really a whuffo story, but when i had like 20 jumps i was packing my first canopy with cross ports, it was one of the dropzones rental rigs and i got all freaked out about a hole being in the canopy, i quickly found the dzo and asked him about this tear in the canopy, he just laughed at me and walked off, i stood there kinda frozen till someone else told me what i was looking at.



I've seen people with hundreds of jumps who see the crossports for the first time and freak out, so don't feel bad.

Heard this one the other day, "So if I graduate this "AFF" program, can I jump with my snowboard after that?" :D

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Did the Lt Col survie??



LOL, Now that is a classic whuffo type response.
I'm sorry, I should be nicer.

I had one today that I aways get.

Wuffo: Do you pack your own chute?
-or-
My favorite: You mean you've done over 500 tandam jumps!?



.............
If we trained monkeys to pack, would you jump their pack jobs?

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