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hech117

Dropzones that go above 14k ft

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Not sure if they still do, but Titusville Fla used to go to 18k.



And they will not only take you, but also your tandem instructor.

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(If you can't read between the lines, it says don't bother.)
Shit happens. And it usually happens because of physics.

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Titusville does go to 15,000 and 18,000 from sea level. I fill the O2 that IS on board the aircraft on an as-needed basis. Usually every 40 loads or so, as I am usually the only user. We have a 3 tank cascade system to charge the on-board factory O2 bottle.

I use the O2 on EVERY load as I climb through 8-10k or so.

There are 24 oxygen ports in the cabin ceiling on our King Air 200's (2 for crew and 22 for jumpers) and 16 on our Taurus 90's (1 for pilot and 15 for jumpers). (The Taurus 90 is the only modified King Air 90 that is legal to use ALL 750 available horsepower)

Our jumpers and customers are asked if they would like to be provided with oxygen for the 3 minutes or so they will be above 15k, and 99.99% turn down the offer.
Our King Air's climb to 15k in about 7 minutes and 18k in about 9 or so. Our time above the 15k level is very short. The oxygen is there if anyone wants it.

You are welcome to come to Titusville, we usually open at 10am, and we only do tandems, so call ahead, and if there is space on the load we will accommodate you as best we can. Keep in mind we have a 125 jump minimum to jump here.
Airline Transport Pilot, Multi-Engine Land, DHC-8
Commercial Multi-Engine Sea, Single Engine Land
Private Glider

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michaelmullins

One DZ, which will remain unnamed, that advertised 18,000' jumps told those that questioned the oxygen supply that the oxygen "came out of the air vents", which is of course so absurd it is comical.

Mike Mullins



Well, about 21% of air is indeed oxygen, so strictly speaking that DZ was correct, oxygen does come out of the air vents.
...

The only sure way to survive a canopy collision is not to have one.

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kallend

*** One DZ, which will remain unnamed, that advertised 18,000' jumps told those that questioned the oxygen supply that the oxygen "came out of the air vents", which is of course so absurd it is comical.

Mike Mullins



Well, about 21% of air is indeed oxygen, so strictly speaking that DZ was correct, oxygen does come out of the air vents.

Our dropzone runs a 78% Nitrogen blend. The larger molecules are less subject to temperature related expansion and contraction.

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theplummeter

****** One DZ, which will remain unnamed, that advertised 18,000' jumps told those that questioned the oxygen supply that the oxygen "came out of the air vents", which is of course so absurd it is comical.

Mike Mullins



Well, about 21% of air is indeed oxygen, so strictly speaking that DZ was correct, oxygen does come out of the air vents.

Our dropzone runs a 78% Nitrogen blend. The larger molecules are less subject to temperature related expansion and contraction.
Air (dry) is already 78% nitrogen (and 1% argon, 21% oxygen). Each component follows the ideal gas law under any reasonable skydiving condition; molecular size is essentially irrelevant.

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