0
kleggo

Peregrine Falkyn harness / container

Recommended Posts

I was listening to the Fucking Pilot podcast last night and heard an interesting interview with Peregrine's David Singer.

It seems he takes a forward thinking take on design / engineering. First time I've heard a skydive gear designer extolling the virtues of Solid Works.

His methods speak to my engineering mind set.

Take a look @ time point 40.00 in this video to see their solution to closing a main container.

 

The video is very long, too long for me to watch at one sitting, but I'll keep working my way through it.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LW9_hx4-NIU&t=2612s

 

Peregrine's web site

 

https://peregrinemfginc.com/

I really liked hearing his thoughts on joining nylon via ultrasonic welding rather than stitching them together.

THAT would make a difference in parachute pack volume!

Anyone here jump one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2022 at 11:42 AM, kleggo said:

I really liked hearing his thoughts on joining nylon via ultrasonic welding rather than stitching them together.

THAT would make a difference in parachute pack volume!

It has been tried on a canopy. Turned out it was impossible to pack.Kinda makes sense if you think about it a little.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/14/2022 at 3:38 PM, padalcek said:

It has been tried on a canopy. Turned out it was impossible to pack.Kinda makes sense if you think about it a little.

Hmm, about 1999 or 2001, someone displayed a welded seam canopy at the PIA symposium. AFAIK is never made it to market and of course no other has. I don't believe the fabric was nylon.  I remember the look of the booth but not who it was. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, councilman24 said:

Hmm, about 1999 or 2001, someone displayed a welded seam canopy at the PIA symposium. AFAIK is never made it to market and of course no other has. I don't believe the fabric was nylon.  I remember the look of the booth but not who it was. 

Atair?  If so, the seams were sewn, but the fabric was an impermeable composite.  The fabric was cut to size after being manufactured in sheets.  The intriguing idea was that the fabric could be laid up with reinforcing strands imbedded so reinforcing tapes wouldn't have to be added later, although this would require custom lay-ups for each panel.  Very hard to pack, since the sewing perforations were the only way for the air to escape.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/17/2022 at 6:18 AM, mark said:

Atair?  If so, the seams were sewn, but the fabric was an impermeable composite.  The fabric was cut to size after being manufactured in sheets.  The intriguing idea was that the fabric could be laid up with reinforcing strands imbedded so reinforcing tapes wouldn't have to be added later, although this would require custom lay-ups for each panel.  Very hard to pack, since the sewing perforations were the only way for the air to escape.  

No it wasn't the Atair your posted about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Atair did do a research and development program with the University of Alberta (?) about custom, non-woven ribs. Instead of traditional load-bearing tapes sewn to a fabric matrix, they laid individual threads along load lines. This sort of construction is used on composite, competition sails, (see America's Cup competition) but is prohibitively expensive for mass-consumption. It allows them to construct sails with molded-in 3D curvature for best possible airflow. They start with huge, 3D plugs, lay threads in successive layers, then bond/glue them all together. None of those wealthy yacht owners seem to care if a set of sails lasts more than one or two seasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

0