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SuperheroTime

Altimeter reads 11 thousand feet out of box?

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Hello everyone!

I just bought an Analog Altimeter and it came in the mail today. I opened it...and it's showing 11 thousand feet. Shouldn't it be at 0? Do I need to put the needle on 0? Sorry for the newbie question, but I'm just getting into Skydiving. Thank you in advance for your assistance!

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SuperheroTime

Hello everyone!

I just bought an Analog Altimeter and it came in the mail today. I opened it...and it's showing 11 thousand feet. Shouldn't it be at 0? Do I need to put the needle on 0? Sorry for the newbie question, but I'm just getting into Skydiving. Thank you in advance for your assistance!




it will change daily depending on barometric pressure,
turn the rough side until it's on Zero...

But to it at your DZ, then ask your instructors to explain how your gear works before they let you enter an operational jump plane.

If you've already done your 1st jump course, repeat it 'cause you seem to have missed some very basic information.
You are not now, nor will you ever be, good enough to not die in this sport (Sparky)
My Life ROCKS!
How's yours doing?

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it will change daily depending on barometric pressure,
turn the rough side until it's on Zero...

But to it at your DZ, then ask your instructors to explain how your gear works before they let you enter an operational jump plane.

If you've already done your 1st jump course, repeat it 'cause you seem to have missed some very basic information.



Thanks! I only did one tandem so far. Doing tandem 2 and 3 next weekend. I have not been to the ground course yet. They are going to schedule me for it. Hence why the newbie question lol Thank you for your assistance!

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Your analog altimeter doesn't actually read altitude. Instead, it reads barometric pressure. As you change altitude the barometric pressure changes, e.g., the pressure drops as you go up, which moves the needle on the display.

This means you need to calibrate it to read "zero" on the ground before you jump. You should do this before every skydive. This is because as the weather changes during the day the barometric pressure changes. The greater the weather change the more the pressure change -- as much as a few hundred feet on the altimeter display if a cold front is moving in.

Talk to your instructors about developing a standard pre-flight procedure that you execute the exact same way before every jump. Among the things this might include are: carefully inspecting your gear (also in the exact same way every time), practicing emergency procedures, checking the winds, discussing the landing pattern and of course, setting your altimeter to zero. And have fun!
www.wci.nyc

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That's hilarious. One of those things that looks like trolling but is an honest question from a newbie.

The problem is with analog, mechanical altimeters. Since they have no electronics to look for a near constant pressure level that indicates it is likely at ground level at your current elevation above sea level and use that instead of an assumed sea level pressure, they need to use trained fleas running on a little wheel to set it. When the alti is boxed up for shipment, the lack of oxygen after a while can make them drowsy or knock them right out.

Call the people who sold you the alti and demand a packet of new fleas, wrapped in breathable paper not plastic. Don't take no for an answer!

Non-electronic gadgets can fool the modern generation. It's like trying out an old typewriter to print something out, and then looking for the buttons to save the document or print out 5 more copies.

That reminds me, I did have a nervous tandem student once who kept adjusting her altimeter to zero on the way up in the plane, so that it would stay looking the way I had set it for her on the ground.

Anyway, newbies do get a little ribbing from time to time. Welcome to skydiving and have fun.

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Dean358

Your analog altimeter doesn't actually read altitude. Instead, it reads barometric pressure. As you change altitude the barometric pressure changes, e.g., the pressure drops as you go up, which moves the needle on the display.

This means you need to calibrate it to read "zero" on the ground before you jump. You should do this before every skydive. This is because as the weather changes during the day the barometric pressure changes. The greater the weather change the more the pressure change -- as much as a few hundred feet on the altimeter display if a cold front is moving in.

Talk to your instructors about developing a standard pre-flight procedure that you execute the exact same way before every jump. Among the things this might include are: carefully inspecting you gear (also in the exact same way every time), practicing emergency procedures, checking the winds, discussing the landing pattern and of course, setting your altimeter to zero. And have fun!



Will do! Thank you for the information Dean!

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pchapman

That's hilarious. One of those things that looks like trolling but is an honest question from a newbie.

The problem is with analog, mechanical altimeters. Since they have no electronics to look for a near constant pressure level that indicates it is likely at ground level at your current elevation above sea level and use that instead of an assumed sea level pressure, they need to use trained fleas running on a little wheel to set it. When the alti is boxed up for shipment, the lack of oxygen after a while can make them drowsy or knock them right out.

Call the people who sold you the alti and demand a packet of new fleas, wrapped in breathable paper not plastic. Don't take no for an answer!

Non-electronic gadgets can fool the modern generation. It's like trying out an old typewriter to print something out, and then looking for the buttons to save the document or print out 5 more copies.

That reminds me, I did have a nervous tandem student once who kept adjusting her altimeter to zero on the way up in the plane, so that it would stay looking the way I had set it for her on the ground.

Anyway, newbies do get a little ribbing from time to time. Welcome to skydiving and have fun.



Thanks PC!

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