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Rustbucket350

Rough Canopy Opening

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My instructors were happy with the jump.  Hell.  I was more than happy since I landed fine.  I didn't expect to have to kick out of line twist on my first solo opening.   Like I said, it wasn't scary at all since I knew what to do based on the ground school.  I just wasn't expecting right away to have to make an emergency decision. 

 

I am excited to continue and I am going to.  I was not afraid at all to get out of it.  I just don't know why it happened.

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6 hours ago, Rustbucket350 said:

Maybe just wind gusts?

Morning Rust,

Kinda chuckled at this ~126 MPH freefall = wind gusts of an F2 Tornado : )

Most of the time, the bag doesn't leave the pack tray symmetrically and can spin a couple of times. Have fun.   

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1 hour ago, BIGUN said:

Morning Rust,

Kinda chuckled at this ~126 MPH freefall = wind gusts of an F2 Tornado : )

Most of the time, the bag doesn't leave the pack tray symmetrically and can spin a couple of times. Have fun.   

I was wondering if I overthought it.  Like I said it was fine and I wasn't ever worried.  Thanks!

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(edited)

Line twists happen.

Under a large, slow, docile student canopy they are usually a minor issue. They can be much more of an issue under a small, high performance canopy.

Any canopy can kill you on any jump - even when you do everything right.

That's why they teach you how to kick out of them.

You did fine. 

As a side note, I learned on direct bag static line gear.
The direct bag setup virtually guarantees line twists every time. 
It was really cool to get to hop & pops and not have them every time. Still got them once in a while, but not all the time.

Edited to add the 'usually' and the part about any canopy.
'Cuz Chuck Akers is smarter than I am.

Edited by wolfriverjoe

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23 minutes ago, wolfriverjoe said:

Under a large, slow, docile student canopy they are a minor issue.

Correction - "Under a large, slow, docile student canopy they are *usually* a minor issue."

Any canopy can kill you on any jump - even when you do everything right.

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Line twists are caused by asymmetries during opening, which can be caused by various things. In skydiving, wind gusts is not one of these things. Don't overthink it, they can happen.

Don't get too relaxed about the canopy flight though. Once you are able to fall and pull stable, they are one of the most dangerous part of the sport, specially when you start getting smaller canopies (and by smaller I mean simply smaller than what you have now, not small, you don't need an 80 sqft canopy to get hurt or hurt somebody else)

Welcome and have fun!

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Thanks guys.  I definitely won't be getting too relaxed but it is an awesome sport.  I never thought I'd even do a tandem but here we are!  When I locked on to my altimeter it finally sank in that I was doing it and that was a cool moment.  Funny thing is I used to absolutely hate heights.

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2 hours ago, chuckakers said:

Correction - "Under a large, slow, docile student canopy they are *usually* a minor issue."

Any canopy can kill you on any jump - even when you do everything right.

Very true. Very good point.

Thank you for the correction.

40 minutes ago, Rustbucket350 said:

... Funny thing is I used to absolutely hate heights.

I still do. 

Pretty serious acrophobia.

 

On a roof?
On a ladder?

No thanks.

But in the plane I'm fine (always have been).

When the door opens, I get a moment of  "Oh crap, that's a loooooong way down."
Once the light goes green, I'm so focused on what I'm doing that I forget about it.
That is also the case for colder jumps. I feel the cold when the door opens, but not once we go.

I'm also fine under canopy.

Someone pointed out to me a long time ago that it's more a 'fear of edges' than a 'fear of heights'. I found that to be both perceptive and accurate.

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2 hours ago, wolfriverjoe said:

Very true. Very good point.

Thank you for the correction.

I still do. 

Pretty serious acrophobia.

 

On a roof?
On a ladder?

No thanks.

But in the plane I'm fine (always have been).

When the door opens, I get a moment of  "Oh crap, that's a loooooong way down."
Once the light goes green, I'm so focused on what I'm doing that I forget about it.
That is also the case for colder jumps. I feel the cold when the door opens, but not once we go.

I'm also fine under canopy.

Someone pointed out to me a long time ago that it's more a 'fear of edges' than a 'fear of heights'. I found that to be both perceptive and accurate.

Hi Joe,

Everything you said.  All of my life. :`(

Jerry Baumchen

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It was the fist bump and devil horns your instructors did on top of your rig. Bad jou jou. You should probably refuse to jump with them again.

-------

On the serious note... In and of themselves, line twists are not that uncommon, and as long as your canopy is level and flying straight, which is 'usually' the case on a big docile student canopy, they are not really a 'malfunction'. This is NOT to say that you should be complacent about them. What the others have said is absolutely true. Watch for traffic and keep track of your altitude as you get out of them. If you haven't got them worked out by decision altitude, then there you go.

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I'm actually glad that I learned how to deal with it on my own right away.  Next week I'm going to go back to do the second and third jumps.  I might do a bit of tunnel time to prepare for freefall truly alone as well.  I don't think I've ever wanted anything as much as I want to be a safe and successful skydiver because it really is amazing.

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How do you guys get back out there after something happens?  Normally I don't overthink things but then again I'm normally not exiting an aircraft before it lands.  I'm probably overthinking it but I haven't jumped since and something in me is calling me back to the sky.  Anxiety has probably set in at this point.

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(edited)
15 hours ago, Rustbucket350 said:

How do you guys get back out there after something happens?

Having to kick out of line twists should not be a traumatic event. Line twists, having to pump the slider down, getting the end cells open, things like that are all part of the normal housekeeping you do in the variables of your openings. Again, don't be complacent about any of that, but that's why you want to be diligent about all the things like being altitude aware, opening your main on time, doing all your canopy checks, so that you can have all that worked out by decision altitude. Every jump. Even having a malfunction that requires a cutaway and reserve ride is not really a near-death experience. It's kind of like getting a flat tire on your car. Swap it out and get on with your day. It's actually kind of fun, you get to pull more handles and play with more of your gear. (Don't ever do it on purpose without needing to. It'll happen soon enough.) AGAIN, not to be be complacent, be diligent. Practice all your EP's and visualize.

 

15 hours ago, Rustbucket350 said:

I'm normally not exiting an aircraft before it lands.

Do it more, and that perspective will change. But only you, with the in-person consult of live instructors, can decide whether this is appropriate for you.

'Overthinking' things can be good in this sport.

 

 

Edited by dudeman17

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The last few years that I taught the first jump course, I taught line-twists, closed end cells and slider-not-all-the-way down as "nuisances." They have happened to me on so many jumps that it is not even a conscious effort for me to correct them.

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15 hours ago, Rustbucket350 said:

Basically, sack up.

Not necessarily. Just study everything so that it all makes sense. That will ease your anxiety. As will more experience. But this is all still new to you. You're still in the 'Holy crap! What the hell am I doing?!' phase. We've all been there.

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(edited)
On 2/15/2022 at 4:11 PM, dudeman17 said:

Not necessarily. Just study everything so that it all makes sense. That will ease your anxiety. As will more experience. But this is all still new to you. You're still in the 'Holy crap! What the hell am I doing?!' phase. We've all been there.

Haha that's exactly where I am!  Weather got in the way and I travel a lot for work so in the gap I started to really overthink it.  I guess I might as well elaborate a bit on that. 

Tandem jump I loved the freefall but found the canopy flight underwhelming.  Aff jump I was pretty stressed midway through freefall since I realized "Shit!  There's nobody on my back and my altimeter is basically a timer." but I loved the canopy flight alone.  Which is funny because the whole time before I got on the plane I was worried about landing.

Anyway yeah I think I'm right in the "WTF? stage.  I'm going to go back this week.  Week off work!

Edited by Rustbucket350

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Dear Rustbucket 350,

This why some skydiving schools start out with tandems to show you "the big picture"

Then they shift to IAD or static-line (typically from 3,000 feet or 1 kilometer) to teach you the basics of steering a parachute and landing. 

If there is a vertical wind-tunnel nearby, they send student there for a few minut4es training before introducing them to accompanied freefall instructors.

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On 2/12/2022 at 2:50 AM, Rustbucket350 said:

How do you guys get back out there after something happens?  Normally I don't overthink things but then again I'm normally not exiting an aircraft before it lands.  I'm probably overthinking it but I haven't jumped since and something in me is calling me back to the sky.  Anxiety has probably set in at this point.

No emotion. No fear. There's a flow chart. Follow it.

Think less. Fly more.

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On 2/23/2022 at 6:03 PM, chuckakers said:

No emotion. No fear. There's a flow chart. Follow it.

Think less. Fly more.

Took that advice to heart.  Did level 2 and 3 today.  Failed 3, flipped over on my back.  Legs weren't right, tried to counteract with the arms.  Didn't work.  Anyway I got lots of compliments on my canopy flights.  Had beautiful openings.  Got to the holding area, chilled, did some non aggressive 360s to drop altitude and went for my final approach both times.  Didn't stand up either landing but I didn't get hurt.  Lots of fun.

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