0
goobersnuftda

Jump Door for Cessna 182P SUCCESS !!!!!

Recommended Posts

Jump Ship modifications on a Cessna 182 can only be performed with the proper approval paperwork. The standard “king of the hill” approval is a STC (Supplement Type Certificate). One step down from that is a L-STC (limited) or in the US the 337 field office form (which they are cracking down on).

The jump ship mods were only for a 182A to a 182N model and that is where the STC stopped. Our club had unknowingly purchased a replacement 182P thinking that was an awesome replacement for our old plane but we found out there was no way to modify the door or step on a P model.

Sealand Aviation in British Columbia has the STC up to the N and over the past 6 months they have been working us to extend that to include the P model. Just this morning the approval came back with a full blown STC going past the P and up to the R model. Waaa hooo !!!

Up to now there was only a single mechanic in Texas that could install the jump door on a 182P. You had to fly the plane to him and over the week (with the help of the pilot) he would get the door done on your plane. His specific STC states that he is the only mechanic certified to do the instillation.

We took off our 182P door and shipped it to Sealand Aviation and they did what they had to at their end to use our door as the blueprint for the STC addition. They shipped the door with the modifications back to us with the small parts that our wrench monkeys will install for the external latch system.

So if you want the jump step and door modification for your Cessna 182 and require the full STC, give these guys a call.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So how does this affect US DZ operators? I know it is easier to import aircraft from Canada due to Transportation Canada's processes are pretty thourgh.

Will the FAA honor a canadian STC?

More importantly, do you have any pictures of the work performed, what type/style of inside latch, and external latch system?

Any idea of cost for the conversion?
We're not fucking flying airplanes are we, no we're flying a glorified kite with no power and it should be flown like one! - Stratostar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just got the approval paperwork today so the AME's can now get to work on the plane installing the door and the external latch system. Will post pictures when the work is done. Will also let you know the price when I get the bill in the mail.... yea really looking forward to that letter :)

As far as I know, a STC is a STC by North American standards. The Canadian standards are very harsh so you are right, the moment a Twin Otter comes up for sale up here it is immediately snatched up and gone down to the US even before the props have stopped spinning from its last shut down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

As far as I know, a STC is a STC by North American standards.



A Canadian STC is a Canadian STC just as a FAA STC is just FAA.
The only way to use a Canadian STC in the US or visa versa is to have it standardized. That means that the STC holder would have to submit the paperwork to the other countries authority and have them accept it. Basically going thru the STC process again.
Good guys at Sealand. Bill does good work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How did you and Sealand decide to apportion all the R&D & certification process time, as opposed to the actual material & labour to build & install the door?

What percentage would they charge you for the R&D overhead, 5% or 50% or whatever? That tricky business decision depends on how big a market everyone expects to see in the future, beyond just your 1 door...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Instillation done and just short of some W&B paperwork, it is ready to go.

Sealand Aviation owns the full blown STC. They put out the $$$, did the T/C issues so it is theirs to sell. The STC applies to the Cessna 182 A-R models.

The STC issue is much one of a rubber stamp for the US and Canada. Yes every country waves their flag but since Cessna is mfg. in the USA and Canada is so very close on the flight standards (yea, those in the know REALLY know what I'm talking about between the US system and Canada), I have never ever heard of a STC being denied if approved in the USA or Canada. The make shift FAA 337 forms are a different story but a STC is a STC.

Want an extra 12v DC cigarette lighter power point in your Cessna 206 so the pilots can have their play toys? Buy the US STC, apply it in Canada and away you go. A STC is the highest you can go, L-STC the next version down and the field office FAA 337 form the bottom.

Anyways, wow does this door ROCK !!! The handle is heavy and solid. Polished steel and SOLID !!! I just wish we could convert the putzy handle we have on our 206 to this one. On the outside it is spring loaded so the half moon handle retracts when let go. It only moves 1/4 turn to open and close and feels so very solid when it closes. Internal release system doesn't have any metal tubes or snag points (unless you have one of those dorky Go Pros mounted like a peg on the top of your helmet).

I'm most impressed with the door. The step for the P-R model is about 2 months away but I am a happy camper none the less. Thought this 1972 Cessna 182P would be the death of me with no STC to open the door to jump :)

SeaLand Aviation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Beauty!

But take a file to that sharp ... students have an annoying habit of trying to stand up on the step ... impossible with my fat @$$ strapped on behind ... but they still try.

I have been known to apply a file to sharp edges on doors ... without even telling the pilot ...
Oh!
Never mind, that sentence has lost internal coherence?????
Hah!
Hah!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The problem is that the model some times means a body style change. You know how the bed of a F-150 truck changes from year to year? The same truck cap from a 2005 will not fit on a 2009? Same thing.

New body styling means new type of door, latch system etc. and I can only guess that the STC requirements means there has to be some sort of testing to show that the function still works the same on a different shape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skydive2

Have you had a chance to operate the aircraft yet? any idea's on turn around times with a full load? I bought a P model (1975) that we are converting to a jump plane now. Would like to get an idea of what to expect...



If you're building up a P take a look into this gross weight increase. It allows for a substantial take-off weight increase by paperwork only.

http://www.182stc.com/

jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To be honest, disappointing at first but that is to be expected.

We had a 182B that was souped up to jumpship standards. STOL kit, X-wing extensions and the regular 230hp engine was replaced with a 260hp Norland Conversion one. Awesome plane but then the 1958 aircraft began to show her age and began nickel and diming us to death (in the aircraft world, nickel and diming means $5,000 to $10,000 to repair :)

So we upgraded the aircraft to a 182P. The big change was not only is this a widebody but the landing gear is not sprung steel but tubular which handles much more stress and weight.

The disappointing part is that the plane as 170hrs on the new engine and it is the normal 230 hp one. Waaay under powered for skydiving up and down operations. The X-wing extentions will be the first thing to upgrade because they can be installed in a couple of days and the cost will be about $6,000 parts, $3,000 or so to install.

Once the big $$$ comes rolling in we will sell the engine and prop for what we can and go to a 300hp engine. After much research the P. Ponk is the one we will be going after with the 3 blade prop. Initially many people go after the Texas Skyways 300hp engine because of the 2,500 TBO but once you look into it you have to completely redo your fuel system, lines, pump, carb work and injectors I believe. Oh yea, and you have to take out your fuel tanks and install completely new ones .... yea way too much $$$ so P. Ponk it is.

Clicky Here for more information

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have 3 182A models, I have it been expecting my P model to be under powered. I'm like you, have a low time engine, so I don't want to PPonk or TX skyway's right now. Mine is a project aircraft (sat neglected for 8+ years) we have already installed sportsman STOL and wing extensions are next. I'm hoping that will make it at least comparable to my A model's as far as turn around times...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The key was the wing tip extensions (more wing to climb with) and the bigger engine. Separate both parts are OK but together they are awesome.

Our 182B served our club very well. That old girl was our #1 workhorse for 15 years and we ran her hard. With that bigger engine and wing extensions we made it our fast climber for our tandems to altitude. Our P206 is our kiddie minivan that takes lots of IAD jumpers to dispatch altitude. Not fast but it carries more people.

The bigger the engine the better. For a normal person having a182 it gets insane in fuel burn but for DZ operations, a 300hp engine climbs fast to altitude and your turn around times are much, much faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for the information but the issue is that our plane is a 182P. I know the STC is available for the A thru N model but with each new model number, it must be specifically listed on the STC. The problem I had was the model listed on the STC stopped at an N and did not include the newer 1975 Cessna P model.

A STC from the 1960's doesn't cut it nor automatically include the new body design models from 1975 (15 years in the future from the old STC).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the picture. Can you give me the STC# so I can look up more information?

Clicky

Also noticed that you left an open gap on the corner instead of the usual cutting it at 45 degrees and putting the corner piece in the door. Never really thought of that but I know up here during the summer to altitude even the breeze that gets through the door crack can get a bit cold. What have you found with that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

0