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Marc K

1:09 Wingload after 35 jumps

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Posted (edited)

Hi all^_^

In short: I have 35 jumps and have an amazing offer for a main canopy, a Silhouette 170 (Wingload would be 1:09 / exit weight is 180lbs)
My question: Is the wingload to high for my level? Any thoughts?

Silhoutte suggests to be at least advanced for the 170, which I'm not yet, but this offer from a friend of mine comes with a full rig (Mirage G4 container, aad, reserve) for only 2k USD. It's hard to say no...

Obviously I need to make a decision in the end, but given that I'm very accurate and comfortable with my landings, when do you think can I jump a 170? Is it worth buying this early?

Thanks for your advise!!

Marc:)

Edited by Marc K

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That sounds like a good deal, but the question about the wing loading is better for your instructors and coaches where you jump. They may recommend renting a few more times at an intermediate size so that it’s a graceful downsize. 
The reserve has to be at least the same size as the main, too, for it to be a good deal. There was a time when people would get smaller reserves (even something like a 135 with a 170), but you really don’t want to downsize on your first reserve ride. There’s a reason people don’t choose rigs like that any more. 
In the longer run, that’s a good wing loading to aim for for many newer jumpers. Not all, though, which is why you want to talk to your instructors. 
Wendy P. 

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just because you buy it at that price doesn't mean you have to jump it immediately.  you could even get another canopy and put inside if you need to.  you didn't mention what you're jumping now so we have an idea of how far down you will be going in this move.  that also make a difference, as going to a 170 from a 190 is much better than from a 240.  but after considering this, wendy is right.  what i would do in your case is get it and put a 190 in it,  but i don't know you so ask someone who does first.  just another option to consider.

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#1 - As Wendy asked, what size is the reserve?

That's probably the most important question. 

Will you be able to safely land that reserve in a small area, under 'less than optimal' conditions? 


The main probably isn't too terrible of a canopy for you.

The old advice of 'it's too small for you, but if you just be careful you'll be ok' was truly horrible but lots of people survived it.

They simply didn't encounter a situation that required more skill than they had. 
Those that did encounter that sort of situation often got hurt. Or killed.

In your case, it's a bit small. But it's a fairly forgiving planform.
It's not like you're jumping a Diablo at 1.5:1 or an Apache at 1.5 at less than a hundred jumps (I know people that have done that, successfully). 

Look at Billvon's "Downsizing Checklist" article (on here in 'safety' I think).
Can you do the things on it? 

How are your landings under what you are jumping now? 
What are you jumping now?
What do the folks that run your DZ think of this idea?
(Hint: If they are saying not to and you're coming here to get approval, don't)

I don't need the answers to these questions. 

But you do.

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You're getting good advice on here, especially about the reserve size and working with your local instructors and canopy coaches. But, as zombie said, if it's truly too good of a deal to pass up, then buy it and stick it in your closet until you're ready for it. If you also buy something else more appropriate in the meantime, you shouldn't have too much trouble re-selling it when you're done with it. There are always people coming up behind you that will need it.

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(edited)

I was on a 168 pilot and a little later 170 sabre with a 200 exit weight at 35jumps so it’s not too unheard of. I also started a canopy course the same day i earned my A license. I would recommend getting into a course as well as talking to instructors who are familiar with your progression. I myself went through a course again at 300ish jumps. most things taught I already knew from my first course but some things I understand better due to learning from a different instructor with a different perspective.

 

always be willing to own up to your mistakes. learning from your own mistakes is easier as you have a first person perspective but try to learn from others mistakes first as it’s more comfortable for you.

 

never stop learning 

Edited by husslr187
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