1 1
winsor

Woke is a Joke

Recommended Posts

(edited)
2 hours ago, winsor said:

If simple decency is defined as humoring the delusional, you're absolutely right.

When I see headlines breathlessly exclaiming "Man Gives Birth!" I first think of the Life of Brian bit or Richard Simmons.  Then it turns out that the 'man' had a uterus handy.

Okay, whatever.

You still don't get it, do you?

If someone asks you to call them by a different name, gender, species or whatever, then it's simple fucking decency to do it, because doing it doesn't change your life in ANY way whatsoever.

If a guy called Jake comes up to you and says 'hey dude, I'd like you to call me Sally from now on' and you say 'no, I'M going to decide what to call you', can't you see how that would make you a complete asshole? It's nothing to do with delusion, and everything to do with you not getting to decide something like this for other people that doesn't affect you and isn't your responsibility.

Edited by yoink
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, yoink said:

You still don't get it, do you?

If someone asks you to call them by a different name, gender, species or whatever, then it's simple fucking decency to do it, because doing it doesn't change your life in ANY way whatsoever.

If a guy called Jake comes up to you and says 'hey dude, I'd like you to call me Sally from no one' and you say 'no, I'M going to decide what to call you', can't you see how that would make you a complete asshole? It's nothing to do with delusion, and everything to do with you not getting to decide something that doesn't affect you and isn't your responsibility like this for other people.

A hundred times this. 
Wendy P. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Nor is simple decency, apparently.

Yep.  

This has been going on forever.  In the 1900's, it was that no self-respecting white person would call a black man "sir."  The rhetoric behind that would have been "You see, you unenlightened commoner, the term 'sir' comes from 'Sire,' which is used to indicate a position of authority or royalty.  And if you think a black man can be royalty, why, I am reminded of Arthur Askey the parish comedian!"

Or in the 1960's: "Miss Gloria Steinhem is apparently mentally ill, and cannot remember if she is married or not.  I will not call women 'Ms' because I refuse to participate in their mental illness.  I will call them 'Mrs' or 'Miss' as appropriate for sane people."

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yoink said:

You still don't get it, do you?

If someone asks you to call them by a different name, gender, species or whatever, then it's simple fucking decency to do it, because doing it doesn't change your life in ANY way whatsoever.

If a guy called Jake comes up to you and says 'hey dude, I'd like you to call me Sally from no one' and you say 'no, I'M going to decide what to call you', can't you see how that would make you a complete asshole? It's nothing to do with delusion, and everything to do with you not getting to decide something that doesn't affect you and isn't your responsibility like this for other people.

Nope, I just reserve the right to call bullshit when appropriate.

Calling someone whatever name they want is really no big deal, so long as it doesn't have too many syllables (i.e. "His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hajj Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, Lord of all the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Sea and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular").

If someone is not okay with a he, she or it, and insists on being addressed as 'fnerg' or whatever, I'm done.  I'm not going to call them anything, if possible, and may revert to 'that individual' or something equivalent.  Mind you, this is all an abstraction since the issue has not come up in practice.

 

BSBD,

Winsor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, winsor said:

Nope, I just reserve the right to call bullshit when appropriate

Fine. But remember that polite company might not accept your evaluation.  Kind of like calling (expression here) a spade a spade. Unless you’re holding a shovel and a spade in your hands, then it’s really not OK any more. No matter what Paula Deen used to say when she was a kid, or how you learned “eeny meeny miny moe”

Wendy P. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, wmw999 said:

Fine. But remember that polite company might not accept your evaluation.  Kind of like calling (expression here) a spade a spade. Unless you’re holding a shovel and a spade in your hands, then it’s really not OK any more. No matter what Paula Deen used to say when she was a kid, or how you learned “eeny meeny miny moe”

Wendy P. 

Gee, and I thought everyone loved 'Colored Spade' from 'Hair.'

Maybe the 'Age of Aquarius' is a better choice in mixed company.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, winsor said:

If someone is not okay with a he, she or it, and insists on being addressed as 'fnerg' or whatever, I'm done.  I'm not going to call them anything, if possible, and may revert to 'that individual' or something equivalent.  Mind you, this is all an abstraction since the issue has not come up in practice.

It has come up for me several times.  One of the participants in a FIRST competition I was a part of preferred the pronoun "they."  So did a transitioning teen I knew, as did an interview candidate we were considering.  I often get it wrong, but am slowly getting used to it.

I would suggest that the issue doesn't come up for you because once those people know you consider them a symptom of "a confluence of stupidity" they may (wisely) avoid you, just as they might avoid the guy down the street who regularly talks about all the darkies ruining his neighborhood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, billvon said:

It has come up for me several times.  One of the participants in a FIRST competition I was a part of preferred the pronoun "they."  So did a transitioning teen I knew, as did an interview candidate we were considering.  I often get it wrong, but am slowly getting used to it.

I would suggest that the issue doesn't come up for you because once those people know you consider them a symptom of "a confluence of stupidity" they may (wisely) avoid you, just as they might avoid the guy down the street who regularly talks about all the darkies ruining his neighborhood.

Maybe, but what a hoot it must be at his house on Thanksgiving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, billvon said:

It has come up for me several times.  One of the participants in a FIRST competition I was a part of preferred the pronoun "they."  So did a transitioning teen I knew, as did an interview candidate we were considering.  I often get it wrong, but am slowly getting used to it.

I would suggest that the issue doesn't come up for you because once those people know you consider them a symptom of "a confluence of stupidity" they may (wisely) avoid you, just as they might avoid the guy down the street who regularly talks about all the darkies ruining his neighborhood.

You are a remarkably bad guesser.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(edited)
13 hours ago, wmw999 said:

A hundred times this. 
Wendy P. 

I would request that I be no longer be referred to as brenthutch or the very derogatory “troll”.  I consider the first to be my “dead name” and the second to be a bigoted slur. From now on I identify as “Grand Exulted Puba” In no way does it diminish anyone to recognize my humanity and my new identity.

Grand Exulted Puba

Edited by brenthutch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, brenthutch said:

I would request that I be no longer be referred to as brenthutch or the very derogatory “troll”.  I consider the first to be my “dead name” and the second to be a bigoted slur. From now on I identify as “Grand Exulted Puba” In no way does it diminish anyone to recognize my humanity and my new identity.

Grand Exulted Puba

I'll go along with whatever identity floats your boat Your Exultedness. However, I'll reserve the right to judge your humanity as I choose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woke:  “Aware of and actively attentive to important facts and issues (especially issues of racial and social justice)." ~Merriam-Webster

Woke: "past of wake." "Alert to injustice in society, especially racism." ~Oxford. 

Words are used to communicate. They change over time and take on new meaning as society adopts them into the use of language. To be woke is to be aware. To be woke is to be attentive. To be receptive. To be aware, attentive and receptive are positive traits. Therefore, the title, "Woke is a Joke" is to be un-woke or unaware, inattentive and unreceptive. Personally, I find these traits to be unappealing. 

Unfortunately. the title "Woke is a Joke" leaves no room for exploration. It can only be defended. It's human nature to defend a hard line proclamation. As we get older, we learn that not everything is so definitive. Even math has a flaw. I know I said that I was done with this, but It's been eating on me that we as a society can't even agree, with all the evidence, that while we may have made a lot of progress in civil rights since 1962, we have much further to go. 

I also have a hard time understanding veterans who served with just about every race, color, religion or national origin - who by the very nature of being in the military had to rely on those who were "different" to stay alive - would not be at the front of social justice; rather than the rear.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, BIGUN said:

When people sense they aren't being heard; they tend to get loud. 

MLK said 'Riots are the voice of the unheard'.

He wasn't condoning violence, but warning that if the injustices continued, the downtrodden would revolt.

Kind of like last year. 
After George Floyd was killed, there were protests.
When MORE unarmed black men were murdered by the cops, those became riots.

There was a comment made, something to the effect of 'If the leadership of various cities learns that the consequences for killing unarmed Black men is going to be several blocks of that city going up in flames, they might reign in the cops'. 

It's been pointed out in a couple different places that the wealth inequity in the US is about the same as it was in France in 1789.
We don't have people starving in the streets, but people are getting pissed off.

Maybe the dipshits in the Capitol on Jan 6 (or more accurately, the ones outside on the steps) had a point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

1 1