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winsor

Woke is a Joke

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3 hours ago, winsor said:

Your assessment of the Marxist nonsense  . . . 

When I read that I have the same sort of reaction I would have to the statement "if you believe what lying Big Pharma says about  . . ." or "sure, that's what brainwashed scientists . . . "

Such unquestioned assumptions in the very first few words of the sentence - assumptions that will never be reconsidered because they support a beloved political ideology -  means that intelligent conversation is no longer possible.

Good luck with that.

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(edited)
20 minutes ago, billvon said:

When I read that I have the same sort of reaction I would have to the statement "if you believe what lying Big Pharma says about  . . ." or "sure, that's what brainwashed scientists . . . "

Such unquestioned assumptions in the very first few words of the sentence - assumptions that will never be reconsidered because they support a beloved political ideology -  means that intelligent conversation is no longer possible.

Good luck with that.

I'm not holding my breath waiting for for 'an intelligent conversation.'

Marxism is on a par with Scientology in its ability to withstand close scrutiny.  In order to adopt either, one must tap in to their inner moron.  It rather goes beyond simple 'suspension of disbelief.'

 

BSBD,

Winsor

Edited by winsor

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3 hours ago, olofscience said:

Don't hold your breath for an intelligent conversation in ANY situation at ANY TIME in your life. You'd die. ;)

Never has the phrase ‘be the change you want to see’ felt more apt.:p

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3 hours ago, olofscience said:

Don't hold your breath for an intelligent conversation in ANY situation at ANY TIME in your life. You'd die. ;)

now this is interesting.  i have heard that is impossible, that as soon as you pass out you start breathing again.  anyone know if that is true or a myth?  anyone care to try?  with a rescue person standing by of course.  and video, separate person for video.  unless one is extremely confident...

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I am sure this lady will effect change in St. Louis:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/the-first-black-woman-to-run-st-louis-is-shaking-up-the-city-with-a-war-on-normal/ar-AAMKmaB

If the result of her leadership works out to be on a par with Tulsa circa 1919 (leave out the massacre), great.

If it works out like Detroit, not so good.

I listened to an interview on NPR a day or two ago, and someone who grew up in Detroit recalled how there was a serious racial divide in income and quality of life in general, which we'll agree is a bad thing.

A Black mayor was elected, and the general consensus among the Black community was 'yay! Now we'll have equality!'

The administration set about the disenfranchisement of White residents who then left, taking with them the tax base.  Without the tax base came equality - EVERYBODY did very badly, much, much worse than before the new mayor decided to 'fix' things.

Thus, I certainly hope the new mayor of St. Louis comes through, makes St. Louis an economic powerhouse and revitalizes the North side, and people there stop shooting each other.  If she pulls it off, I will applaud her achievement.

 

BSBD,

Winsor

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If maintaining the status quo means maintaining inequality, because the rich people will get pissed off, maybe the status quo isn't great. Money is not the only determinant of success, even here in the US, where we have glorified and on occasion deified it.

The model we have of kowtowing to rich people, because they pay the bills, doesn't seem to be improving things. While you may prefer the times of the 50's, when we had a booming postwar economy, remember that there were, in fact, significant social and political rights inequities. I think we can agree that political rights inequities are bad, mhmm?

I don't think there's a perfect stasis, because the more humans there are, the more people who will decide to exploit that stasis for their own gain. And the larger volume of people engaged in that means that eventually some who are really, really, good at it will come along.

The founding fathers didn't think the Constitution would last 150 years, and some were fairly convinced it might not last 50. While I don't think it's time to just trash it and go for all-out revolution, we are approaching the level of financial differential of the Gilded Age, and I don't think that's a good thing.

Wendy P.

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1 hour ago, winsor said:

The administration set about the disenfranchisement of White residents who then left, taking with them the tax base. 

Ah yes, the poor disenfranchised white people, such a common theme in American history. Anyone else want to place bets on how accurate Windsor’s assertion turns out to be?

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48 minutes ago, sfzombie13 said:

i'm still trying to figure out how tulsa went in 1919 as all i recall reading about is the black folks got the worst end of that deal. 

My "suspicion" is a sarcastic attempt at an associative process between T.D. Evans, et.al., White Supremist leadership of Tulsa during the Outrage and her leadership of blacks in St. Louis today. 

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from everything i have read about segregation, when left alone in their own communities, black folks have thrived and consistently out-performed their white counterparts.  then the white folks got jealous and took everything away, destroyed what they built, and made sure it wouldn't happen again.  maybe the op of this thread wants that to continue, and based on that last comment, it appears that way.  some things never change, and folks with that attitude seem to want it to continue.

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2 hours ago, sfzombie13 said:

i'm still trying to figure out how tulsa went in 1919 as all i recall reading about is the black folks got the worst end of that deal. 

The massacre was in 1921. 

In 1919, there was a thriving, prosperous and vibrant black community in Tulsa.
Many were wealthy.

Many were well educated.

It was a great example of what a "black community" could look like.

So the whites destroyed it.

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48 minutes ago, wolfriverjoe said:

It was a great example of what a "black community" could look like.

Perhaps that was what Winsor meant. I would hope we can work towards not having communities based on race.   

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4 minutes ago, BIGUN said:

Perhaps that was what Winsor meant. I would hope we can work towards not having communities based on race.   

I would hope we could work together towards a day when it doesn't matter, and a black community would be as noteworthy (and as important) as a "blood type O" community.

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1 hour ago, wolfriverjoe said:

The massacre was in 1921. 

In 1919, there was a thriving, prosperous and vibrant black community in Tulsa.
Many were wealthy.

Many were well educated.

It was a great example of what a "black community" could look like.

So the whites destroyed it.

That's precisely what I was referencing.

You have Black mayors who do an absolutely great job, others not so much.  Same thing goes for any ethnicity, now that I think of it.

Two examples that came to mind were Tulsa (what came after the 1919 era is another issue, and absolutely ghastly) and Detroit.

In my neighborhood, the standards are pretty much the same for any of the homeowners.  They want a great education for their kids, great public servants (most assuredly including Police), and a strong community.  Given the parents I know from school and Scouting, it really does not seem to matter what continent or culture they come from.  They're all Really Well Educated and Successful As Hell.

If a cop pulls over a Black guy around here, the dialogue is mostly "excuse me Doctor, but your taillight is out.  The Mercedes dealership is open for another hour.  How's your son?"

"Thanks, Officer, he's doing great.  Say hi to the Chief."

So what if I'm spoiled?  So is everyone around here, and it's a good thing.  By and large nobody cares about race per se, which is the way I like it.

I am serious that I hope St. Louis becomes a great success.  I have yet to see perseverating on race being a part of such a success.

 

BSBD,

Winsor

 

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(edited)

 

9 hours ago, wolfriverjoe said:

The massacre was in 1921. 

In 1919, there was a thriving, prosperous and vibrant black community in Tulsa.
Many were wealthy.

Many were well educated.

It was a great example of what a "black community" could look like.

So the whites destroyed it.

didn't they have the bloody summer in that year with 19 bloody engagements?  i forgot where, just that it happened across the country.that was the reason it happened, to destroy it.  a shame is what it is.

Edited by sfzombie13

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21 minutes ago, sfzombie13 said:

 

didn't they have the bloody summer in that year with 19 bloody engagements?  i forgot where, just that it happened across the country.that was the reason it happened, to destroy it.  a shame is what it is.

They had the 'Red Summer', where returning veterans clashed with blacks over jobs. Unions were also having a hard time of it, being called 'socialists' and getting attacked by the corporate thugs (backed by the cops).

But that didn't affect the "Black Wall Street" in Tulsa all that much.

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10 hours ago, winsor said:

Two examples that came to mind were Tulsa (what came after the 1919 era is another issue, and absolutely ghastly) and Detroit.

Congratulations for, once again, engaging in critical race theory by looking at some examples of how we got where we are in terms of race relations.

Now do you want to tell us again about how anyone who engages in critical race theory is an idiot?

 

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6 hours ago, billvon said:

Congratulations for, once again, engaging in critical race theory by looking at some examples of how we got where we are in terms of race relations.

Now do you want to tell us again about how anyone who engages in critical race theory is an idiot?

 

For the same reason that one espousing Phlogiston Theory is hardly a Thermodynamicist.

I'm impressed by your inability to distinguish between the study of history that considers race as a factor and the study of race as the prime mover of history.  Race and climate change are significant factors in the environment in which we live, but are ill suited to form the basis of respective religious movements. 

Then again, when you consider quite how stupid religions are by their very nature, I suppose these are as good as any.

 

BSBD,

Winsor

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